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I don't suppose anyone here needs one of those old levers. Just in case, though, contact this guy: http://news.yahoo.com/51-years-wreck-7-inch-car-part-found-164436702.html


Arthur Lampitt of Granite City shows off the 1963 Thunderbird turn signal that was embedded in his arm for 51 years after having surgery to remove it on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014. The 7-inch turn signal was embedded in his arm during a traffic accident that broke Lampitt's hip, drawing attention away from the arm, which healed.

CREVE COEUR, Mo. (AP) — Fifty-one years ago, Arthur Lampitt of Granite City, Illinois, smashed his 1963 Thunderbird into a truck. This week during surgery in suburban St. Louis, a 7-inch turn signal lever from that T-Bird was removed from his left arm.

Dr. Timothy Lang removed the lever Wednesday during a 45-minute operation. Lampitt, now 75, is recovering at home.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1EOtGa6 ) reports that the accident broke Lampitt's hip, drawing attention away from the arm, which healed.

A decade or so ago, his arm set off a metal detector at a courthouse. An X-ray showed a slender object the length of a pencil, but since it caused no pain or hardship, Lampitt was told to let it be.

He was moving concrete blocks a few weeks ago when the arm began to hurt for the first time.

"Everything was fine until it started to get bigger," Lampitt's wife, Betty, said. "The arm started bulging."
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Arthur Lampitt of Granite City shows off the 1963 Thunderbird …
Arthur Lampitt of Granite City shows off the 1963 Thunderbird turn signal that was embedded in his a …

Lampitt decided to have surgery. He initially wasn't sure what was in the arm. He wondered if perhaps a medical instrument had been left during the emergency room visit in 1963.

He unearthed a collection of old photos of the mangled Thunderbird taken by a friend at the scene. He noticed the metal blinker lever was missing from the left side of the steering column. He figured that was it, and surgery at City Place Surgery Center in Creve Coeur, Missouri, confirmed it.

"Seven inches long," Lang told Betty.

"Oh, my God," Betty said.

Lang said a protective pocket grew around the lever.

"We see all kinds of foreign objects like nails or pellets, but usually not this large, usually not a turn signal from a 1963 T-Bird," Lang said. "Something this large often gets infected."

Lampitt wasn't sure what he'd do with the lever — maybe make a key chain out of it.

"We'll figure out something, I am sure," he said.
 

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I'm really suprised that thing didn't cause him problems a long time ago! :confused:

Joe
 

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I don't suppose anyone here needs one of those old levers.
My dad has a 1963 Thunderbird, I'll ask him!

Crazy story.
 

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I saw that story; I used to have one of those cars. :)

That car was the "Proverbial Deathtrap":

  • Short seatbacks with no headrest
  • All Metal Dash with lots of sharp edges and points, especially near the Center of Dash radio
  • Simple lap belts, hardly ever used
  • Heavy metal framed windows of standard glass on the sides
  • A Very Solid point of metal that mached the "swoopiness" of the dash projected out Just Enough to Catch your Right Kneecap as you exit the vehicle; I still limp on that side
The car weighed 5500lbs; it's only saving grace was that whatever you hit got it much worse, lol.

I loved that car anyway, lol. :D


The strangest thing about the car was that the steering wheel moved to the right in park, to make getting out easier. :D
 
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