TCCoA Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since I'm a resident of Las Vegas and our summers are 115+ degrees heat will obviously always be an issue and fear. During my upcoming transmission build and replacement per Alan's suggestion as well as many others I opted for the biggest and baddest transmission cooler I could find, the tru-cool max 4739-1 40,000 gvw 45,000 btu transmission cooler without thermal bypass since we see 32 degrees 2 or 3 days a year and I don't mind waiting for the car to warm up before use. Also as per Alan and my tuners recommendations I'll be using it as a stand alone unit to benefit the transmission temperature as well as isolating the coolant system.

My question is what should the transmission temperature be at or near after the swap with this cooler, DirtyDog high stall marauder torque converter, and my horrible ambient summer temperatures?

Also is there ever a point where this cooler just plain isn't up to the task? Or where you'd need something even bigger or need to add fans to this unit?

On the opposite end of the spectrum is there a certain temperature where these transmissions should not be, as in running too cold, like never reaching operating temperature?

Thanks in advance,
Chris
 

·
PostWhore, The AFDB is on a lil tight.
Joined
·
3,868 Posts
DOnt forget to upgrade the lines the cooler. Im running this cooler and the temps still managed to get hot enough to burn out a shift solenoid. Getting a fan in there would mean removing the the PS cooler. Im running that cooler as a stand alone aswell. YOu can run 2 inline coolers if you want to go nuts I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,039 Posts
We are using our A/C condenser as a big cooler on our 4r70w
No problems with pressure drops at all.
Temps according to our Autometer gauge are 150F during highway cruising/normal operation and ~180F on the track.

The transmission does take a little while longer to warm up but it does get to 150F within 15 minutes. I'm not sure about the BTU cooling capacity of our A/C condenser in relation to a real transmission cooler. I'm willing to bet it's greater on the condenser given the surface area. I believe those designs have one pipe that winds its way back and forth from the inlet to the outlet. Our A/C condenser splits out the intake at one end into a bunch of parrallel pipes that run all the way to one end and back again before being combined together at the outlet.

Hope this gives you some points of reference even though it's not exactly your situation.
-g

PS. if you are really curious, why not get yourself an ATF temp gauge?
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top