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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a pin hole sized leak in my power steering hose and it's spraying on the exhaust manifold and burning. The hose with the leak is the one with blue painters tape on it. The leak is in the rubber part below the steel tube.
How hard is it to replace that hose? Obviously it's real easy at the top part, but the bottom looks like it's gonna be hard to do.
Has anyone here replaced that particular hose before?



 

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Yeah, on a Mustang but the racks are about the same.
It isnt easy, but not real hard and you need a GOOD Tubing wrench


Size not relevent
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, on a Mustang but the racks are about the same.
It isnt easy, but not real hard and you need a GOOD Tubing wrench


Size not relevent
I might not do it myself. Haven't decided. It depends on how much a mechanic will charge. But one thing for sure, I hadn't heard of a tubing wrench, so I learned something. Thank you. I always used regular open end wrenches for jobs like this.
BTW, do you know what that other tube is for? The only clean one. The one that's higher up and has a tiny black cap on it. It was covered with misty water. I may have another problem going on there. It looks like a washer of some kind has fallen out and is sitting at the bottom of that tube.
 

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i've done it on my '91 XR7 (5.0L) some time ago, it's a mild PITA, but it can be done, there may of been a easier way to have done it verses the way i did it thou?

Also the other tube is for your air conditioning, which is the `pump' that's below the power steering pump
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i've done it on my '91 XR7 (5.0L) some time ago, it's a mild PITA, but it can be done, there may of been a easier way to have done it verses the way i did it thou?

Also the other tube is for your air conditioning, which is the `pump' that's below the power steering pump
I thought it was AC. Thanks. I'm wondering about the water condensation that was on it. I wonder if it's possible that it's somehow from the burning power steering fluid or is this a separate problem. Well, I'll find out for sure soon.

I'm gonna have to change the PS hose myself. The Ford Dealer wanted $480.00 to do it. He said the part is about $180.00. I'm getting a non Ford part for $39 later today. Also, I'll get the tubing wrench like pettyfog recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It looks like I need to remove the lower radiator hose to get to the bottom end of the power steering hose. Is that correct?
 

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Just use precaution installing that line, try not to shred the teflon o-ring on installation.
 

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That's just condensation on the AC hose so it shouldn't be a problem, pretty normal.

Also I know I did t open up the cooling system on my car, but you may want to remove the washer tank to give you a little more room which I believe is what I did? Also before you go buy the wenches take the hose with you to make sure you ge the right sizes:) and thinking of the hose, make sure it has the seals (or was it jut one that's needed?
 

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i've done it on my '91 XR7 (5.0L) some time ago, it's a mild PITA, but it can be done, there may of been a easier way to have done it verses the way i did it thou?

Also the other tube is for your air conditioning, which is the `pump' that's below the power steering pump
And the little washer is just leftover from factory assembly of the a/c line springlok connection. It held the spring in place till the other tube was mated.

You will just have to see if that lower radiator hose gets in your way too much. You cant plan EVERYTHING but should always be ready to modify your approach.

Never NEVER use open end, except to hold/backup, on brake lines esp. That is if you care about the nut you're removing or keeping either of the parts..
If I replace a line I sometimes need to keep the nut so I can use it on standard line and I cant get the factory version {95 taurus w/ rear disk excellent example}.

And if I want to replace line then I often just cut line and use 6 point deep well socket. You MIGHT consider that if it's feasible.

But ALWAYS use 6 point rather than 12 or straight jaw whenever possible
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's just condensation on the AC hose so it shouldn't be a problem, pretty normal.

Also I know I did t open up the cooling system on my car, but you may want to remove the washer tank to give you a little more room which I believe is what I did? Also before you go buy the wenches take the hose with you to make sure you ge the right sizes:) and thinking of the hose, make sure it has the seals (or was it jut one that's needed?
Great sugestion about removing the washer tank. That's the first thing I'll do. I'm just home for lunch. I'll start after work this eveninig. No hurry. I'm getting around on a bicycle.
What kind of power steering fluid do I use. Is it type F transmission fluid like on my 70 Cougar? (gone but not forgotten)
 

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Great sugestion about removing the washer tank. That's the first thing I'll do. I'm just home for lunch. I'll start after work this eveninig. No hurry. I'm getting around on a bicycle.
What kind of power steering fluid do I use. Is it type F transmission fluid like on my 70 Cougar? (gone but not forgotten)
That'll work, but it seems like, if you're going to switch to Mercon V for the auto anyway, Mercon V may be better.

I'd use whatever your transmission uses, Mercon III standard, Mercon V after a full empty and refill.

(Current suggestion I've gotten is Mercon V for the AODs even though some of the older notes recommend not, due to the additive package being tweaked a bit by Ford.)

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is turning out to be harder than I thought. It took me a while just to figure out where the bottom end of the hose is located. It looks like it's gonna be real hard to get two wrenches in place to remove the hose. If I'm lucky, they will be loose enough to turn easily. If they're tight, I'm in trouble.
I had originally looked at it wrong and for sure I don't need to remove the lower radiator hose.
I decided to remove the top end of the hose first and also what I think is the return hose. The reason why is so that I can bend them out of the way to get to the lower end. I'll have more room.
That is my first problem. So far, I can't get the upper tube off. The 3/4 inch open end wrench that I hold the big end with is too thick and it gets in the way of removing the small end with the 11/16th tubing wrench. Maybe I didn't buy a "good" tubing wrench? I just bought a cheap set at O'Reiely. The large nut isn't 6 sided. It's round on top and bottom with flat sides. So I have to access that large nut from straight above or if I had a very short 3/4 wrench, from below. I need a thinner 3/4 open end wrench. You can't see from the picture, but I can't hold the large part from the side. It must be done from above or below and the pump is in the way and doesn't allow me to get the wrench far back enough to fit (securely) on the 11/16th on the smaller nut. I gave up for the night.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I ended up taking it to a shop. They charged me about $260.00 using my part. Thanks for the tips though. At least I learned something.
 

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Just catching up to the thread. $260 is not a bad deal if this was the high pressure line.

I did the same recently and more, I don't remember what was worse, changing the lines or cleaning up the mess from the leak.

I had to do a pump, low, and high pressure line replacement. Though the high pressure hose required creativity with two wrenches to loosen and to tighten, I had the advantage of taking out the power steering pump and lines for more work space.

The modern high pressure replacement hoses do have a purge valve you need to reuse off the original line and getting the air out of the system, so the cost was pretty good if he did all that.

I didn't remove the lower rad hose, but ended up changing it a month later when I did the thermostat, but seeing the back side and how the fluid had softened the hose, was glad I did.

Am contemplating a cooler for the power steering, I put in a magnet filter catch inline on the low pressure side, wonder if anyone is running one too.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just catching up to the thread. $260 is not a bad deal if this was the high pressure line.

I did the same recently and more, I don't remember what was worse, changing the lines or cleaning up the mess from the leak.

I had to do a pump, low, and high pressure line replacement. Though the high pressure hose required creativity with two wrenches to loosen and to tighten, I had the advantage of taking out the power steering pump and lines for more work space.

The modern high pressure replacement hoses do have a purge valve you need to reuse off the original line and getting the air out of the system, so the cost was pretty good if he did all that.

I didn't remove the lower rad hose, but ended up changing it a month later when I did the thermostat, but seeing the back side and how the fluid had softened the hose, was glad I did.

Am contemplating a cooler for the power steering, I put in a magnet filter catch inline on the low pressure side, wonder if anyone is running one too.
Oh, that's what that thing (purge valve) was! An empty hole on the new part and on the old part the hole had a short plug that I had no idea what it was. I thought maybe it was for an option my car didn't have or possibly for when used on a different car. Directions were sealed in a plastic bag that I didn't open because I thought there was a chance I'd have to return the part. I imagine the directions explained about the purge valve.
I explained in a post above that I had looked at it wrong when I thought maybe you need to remove the radiator hose.
Normally I'd feel like a doofus for not changing my own hose. This one is an exception.
 
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