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So over the past 3 or so weeks medicalmike and I did a t45 swap into his 95 4.6L

Same guy from this and this thread.

Here is the full album on imgur.

We used a t45 from a 99 mustang and we were able to get supercoupe pedals.
The supercoupe pedals are really nice because there are dimples on the firewall for where to drill your holes. You don't need to make a template and cross your fingers, half the work was done for you.
There is a hole at the top to put a bolt but it doesn't have threads. The bolt for the brake pedal cage and the nuts for the clutch pedal cage were all metric 8x1.25 so I just took a tap and ran it through the hole to create new threads and put a bolt in it to support the clutch pedal cage.
It wasn't too hard to remove the entire dashboard and I found it much easier to put in the clutch pedal, drill the hole in the firewall and cut the hole in the floor pan.

After the dashboard was removed, the hole in the firewall drilled and the pedals mocked into place, we used this opportunity to cut and grind the pedals to accept the Mustang Bullit pedal covers.

medicalmike decided to opt for the McLeod universal Hydraulic Throwout Bearing instead of mocking up a bracket for an s10 slave cylinder and I must say I like the whole set up, there's enough fabrication involved in this swap so I was very glad to have one less thing to fabricate.

A couple things to note, we found part numbers listed on this forum to fit onto the thunderbird super coupe hydraulic master cylinder and give it a -AN fitting for the hydraulic lines.
The fittings we ordered based on those numbers were a -3AN fitting and -3AN braided line and the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing comes with a -4AN line, we bought an adapter to connect the two and it works fine.
We ran the hydraulic line through the clutch cable hole in the t45 and then used the clutch cable & fork cover, to hide the lines and keep crud away from the clutch & pressure plate. This cover will not fit against the stock catalytic converter without modification. I ended up cutting a good chunk out of this aluminum cover using a cut off wheel and if the heat from the cat proves to be a problem for the hydraulic line I can easily go back and stuff or line the cover with some sort of heat wrap.

Also, the universal throwout bearing has to be adjusted so the clearance between the throwout bearing and the pressure plate is between 0.100" and 0.125"
The instructions advise you to figure out this adjustment by putting the bellhousing on the engine and measuring from the bellhousing to the pressure plate, and then measure from the transmission face to the throwout bearing and subtracting the two to find your current clearance and adjust from there. That's not exactly possible with the t45 since you can't really remove the bellhousing so we had to do some trial and error.
In the end you'll need to reduce the clearance by about an inch. The supplied sleeve is 0.700" and the adjustable sleeve can come out another 0.700" we ended up getting a set of feeler gauges inside the access hole (I used 0.018, 0.019, 0.020, 0.021, and 0.022 for a grand total of 0.100, aka the suggested clearance :) ) to get an idea how close we were and if we got it.
Yes this means you'll have to put the transmission up at least 2x but it's not so bad, really.

We notched the transmission crossmember all the way to the end and we cut a hole in the side to fit the large transmission mount nut. To anyone doing this swap I want to suggest when you notch the crossmember that you don't leave the notch rounded at the end, the bolt in the mount has a square shaft at the very top where it meets the crossmember and we are right against it. I think we might have to take the crossmember off again and clean up this notch but for right now we're leaving it alone.

There's another thread in this forum that shows someone taking the hole from the automatic shifter plate and extending it forward to clear the manual transmission shifter. We did not do this because we felt we could use a 4 inch hole saw and drill a hole for the manual transmission shifter and still reuse the automatic shifter plate to reduce road noise. This allowed us to do something else slightly different.

This swap has always been a good guide, but we were not keen on building an extension housing for the t45.
So we were initially going to follow this guide and attach a dummy shifter right behind the transmission.
But we then realized that the automatic shifter plate was the perfect spot to mount the dummy shifter and it won't move and we can just fabricate one bracket to connect the dummy shifter to the real shifter.
We turned the dummy shifter around so we can utilize as much flat space as possible on the automatic transmission mount and the dummy shifter sticks out pretty much dead center on the automatic shifter plate.
I cut a hole in the automatic shifter plate, trimmed it to fit the dummy shifter from underneath, drilled 4 holes and then I was able to use the original 4 bolts that came from the shifter, with 4 nuts (metric size 8 x 1.25) and used RTV silicone to seal it up real nice.

When we drilled the 4 inch hole for the shifter we ended up losing the 2 front holes for the automatic shifter plate but we just drilled 2 new holes and bolted the plate down using the same clips they were originally bolted down with.
We also had to notch the 4 inch hole just a little bit in the front of the shifter because the stopper screw would hit the floor pan and we didn't want any trouble if we had to do the clutch again in the future.

When the dummy shifter was mounted on that automatic shifter plate and then installed in the car we found that the nub on the dummy shifter was hitting the driveshaft so we just cut it off with a cut-off wheel.

We put the dashboard back in but left the center console out because we were frequently putting it in and taking it back out just to test fit where the shifter would come out and how comfortable it would be.

Once we had the transmission in and the dummy shifter mounted we tackled the rod, or bar, or whatever you want to call it to connect the dummy to the shifter.
Once we had it in place we realized we really did not like the position of the stock shifter stick.
The short shifter we used on the transmission came with some bolts and a small shifter stick that was supposed to bolt onto it's own little bracket. The holes in this shifter stick were too far apart for us to bolt directly to the dummy shifter but that's ok because that would have been way too short.
In the end we just took some of that left over 1 inch angled steel bar and cut a small 4 inch piece and drilled 4 holes in it, to mount it to the dummy shifter and then mount the small aftermarket shifter stick to the bar.

We then used a shifter boot from an 06 mustang that we bought online and we didn't have to attach it to the center console at all. We just threw it on top, it sat on top of the shifter bar that we fabricated and when the center console was installed it came up pretty close to the console that it looks like it is attached. It also doesn't move too much when you shift so you can't tell that the boot is not attached.

Some problems I want to note, for anyone else attempting this swap.
You can use the crown vic driveshaft, but you will need a 31 spline slip yoke and you will need to re-use the flange yoke from the cougar (this is the other end of the driveshaft that connects to the rear end), the bolt pattern for the flange yoke is not the same on the cougar and crown vic.

Also, you will probably need conversion joints. I think they are 1330-1350 but I can't be sure. We ended up re-using the original spiders with new end caps from a new u-joint kit. Not my preferred method but the car is driveable.

The car was equipped with a stock exhaust. However medicalmike had a 2.5 inch true dual exhaust on his 94 3.8l cougar and wanted to use that on this car. The exhaust kit was designed as a cat-back exhaust for the v8 and he bought it with cats and downtubes for the v6. The downtubes and cats would not fit on the v8, the angle was not right. But we were able to cut the stock exhaust on the v8 and attach this true dual exhaust as a cat-back exhaust. The stock exhaust is 2 inches so you'll need the right adapter or you will have exhaust leaks like we did.

After starting the car, we immediately got the flashing O/D light. We pulled the bulb, problem solved.
We did not get any airbag light.
We did get a check engine light but then it went away. We don't know if it came on because of the exhaust leak or if it needs a tune, when we figure it out we'll let you know.
We did not try to rev the car to 4k rpms or shift the car at 4k rpms. We need to break in the clutch so we'll let you know what happens after the clutch is broken in.

The speedometer, we pulled out the speedo gear from the automatic and were going to swap it into the manual but it wouldn't fit, the auto gear was longer than the manual gear.
When I looked closely, they were both the same diameter and had the same number of teeth so if I swapped them it would make no difference.
The speedometer is off, it reads about 76 when cruising about 65, hopefully we can take care of that with a tune.

So that's that. It took us somewhere around 3 weeks to a month in our spare time but it is driving.
Add another 5 speed mn12 to your list.
 

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Just cut the tip off the end of your stock speedo gear, it works perfect
 

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I really like how you did the rear shifter, thats pretty slick. I did the angle iron bit on mine and used a SC lower boot to try and seal up the hole, but it has never been quiet enough for my taste. I still have my automatic plate, I may have to give this method a shot. For the piece you have connecting the 2 shifters together, what do you have going on there?? From what I can see in the pics it looks like just a piece of flat steel bolted down, any bearings or bushings? How is it for feel and firmenss or sloppiness and such??
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I really like how you did the rear shifter, thats pretty slick. I did the angle iron bit on mine and used a SC lower boot to try and seal up the hole, but it has never been quiet enough for my taste. I still have my automatic plate, I may have to give this method a shot. For the piece you have connecting the 2 shifters together, what do you have going on there?? From what I can see in the pics it looks like just a piece of flat steel bolted down, any bearings or bushings? How is it for feel and firmenss or sloppiness and such??
Yea, I reviewed the previous write ups a bit before starting the swap and when it actually came down to drilling the hole in the floor, we mocked up the manual transmission and saw we could just do a 4 inch hole saw and modify it from there, we felt that was a cleaner job. That way we could keep the automatic shifter plate.
We actually fully intended to build the bracket right on the transmissions shifter like you did, we went and bought the angle iron for it but when we got to it, we realized, the shifter base just needs to remain stationary and the shifter stick needs to connect the two shifters.

The main bracket we used to connect the two shifters is the angle iron that we originally intended to use to connect the shifters.
A flat piece of iron would probably have way too much flex for the shifter to hit 1,2,5 & R.
We trimmed down one side of the angle, so it was a 1x1 bar, and one side we trimmed to roughly 1/2 inch but as long as there is some metal on that angle it has a lot of rigidity.
From there, I cut the piece to a rough length with about an inch of excess incase I screwed up, drilled the first hole for the real shifter and then trimmed the bar to clear the shifter boot.
Mocked up the dummy shifter to where we wanted and drilled the second hole.
I rounded all the edges, ground off any old paint, gave it a good coat of primer and flat black and bolted it on.

To bolt it on, the shifters themselves have the threaded holes, which is m8 x 1.25 just like everything else, so i got some long bolts, i put anti-sieze on the angle iron so it can pivot around the bolt like it needs too, and i put loctite on the threads and tightened it down.
THIS IS NOT ENOUGH, the bolts will come loose because the antisieze ends up mixing with the loctite and it doesnt set.
What we are going to do now, is get another m8x1.25 bolt that is longer, and it will stick out the other end of the shifter, then we can still put antisieze but now we can throw a second nut on the back with a lock washer so it's kind of like double-nutting the bolt but also using a lock washer.
That should hold just fine.

As for the shifter stick, we made a second bracket, about 4 inches long so we could mount the small aftermarket shifter stick, to the oem dummy shifter.

We did not use any bushing or bearing for the main piece of angled iron, we drilled the hole to 5/16ths which is pretty much 8 mm so there is no slack in the bolt and we put the antisieze to prevent binding and it shifts really really well.
I have a video I took on my phone of how well it shifts and it wasn't even bolted down tight yet. I would show you but I don't know where to upload it to.
 

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Glad to see another one on the road. The reason I didn't do the shifter extension like you was I was concerned that unless the motor and trans are rigidly mounted, any movement in the driveline would be transmitted to the front shifter, but not the rear, and I was worried about it throwing the car out of gear when you hit a bump or something like that. Let me know how it works out for you, cause that would definitely make it simpler to seal up the floor if you only had one hold to cover instead of 2. For the link bar between the 2, I revised that setup with the angle iron, and instead I used an old jack handle that I had laying around, and I notched both sides to clear the shifters, and then I did like you said with double-nutting the bolts to prevent it backing out. The other thing I did was after it was all together, I put some butyl on there cause every so often at particular rpms I would get a rattle that just drove me nuts.
 

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I was actually more concerned with flex in the auto plate. I never actually thought about driveline movement, but thats a good point. Maybe the solution would be to leave the angle iron bolted and shifter bolted to the trans and make a hole in the auto plate and seal that up. it would make the area you need to seal a heck of alot smaller thats for sure.
 

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So how does it run any updates or refinements? I considered doing this swap 2 years ago when my 4r70 needed a rebuild and decided against it due to all the BS of welding together a new extension box onto the trans ect.... Looks like you guys came up with a easier way to do this. I do have a few questions for you thought about this swap.

1. The cut cross member for the trans are there any concerns about strength? looking at your pics it seems really flimsy where it mounts at the end.
2. The bottom cover you had to cut a chunk out of to cleat the cat I'm assuming this was due to the third cat in the system where it acts as a Y-Pipe in the stock setup?
3. What center console are you using the stock automatic with the auto guts removed or a SC stick center console?
4. and lastly if I am understanding correctly the stock drive shaft out of a crownvic with the t45 yoke is the proper lenth for this swap. Also on that am I to understand you used the new caps on the old joint and it fit properly?
5. Lastly how much do you think you have into this swap?

I've always wanted a stick on my 4.6L these engines love the midrange and just don't wake up till around 3000rpm perfect for a stick shift. With an automatic (at least without a high stall converter) these cars just dog off the line.

One last thing I was thinking about the issue with the speedo being off. Did you change out the pumpkin, gears, or change tire/rim size during the swap? If not it should be dead on still (unless the t45's teeth are different). Maybe the gear you have is slightly different and you can't see it might be worth a shot to just try what warmaster259 said and cut the original down and try it to see if it changes. Shrugs IDK just a thought.
 

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1) If you get a T45 out of a GT, the trans mount will be in the exact same location as the 4R70 mount, so you won't have to modify the trans crossmember in any way.

2) I'm not sure exactly what cover you ar talking about, but I nad no clearance issues with a T45 swap with stock exhaust on either my 94 Cougar or my 98 MarkVIII.

3) Just use the stock auto console. Once the auto shifter itself is removed, there is nothing in that area. Just center the rear shifter in the middle of that hole, and get a leather shifter boot and glue it to the underside of the console top, and when you are all done, it will look factory.

4) A stock steel crown vic driveshaft will be the correct length, and is your best bet if you are doing the swap on a budget. The aluminum CVPI driveshaft is actually an inch too short due to the extended tailshaft on the 4R70 used in police cars. To get an aluminum driveshaft in there, it will need to be custom made. If going with the crown vic steel driveshaft, all you need to do is swap out the front yoke for the T45 one, and swap the rear flange for the stock MN12 one. Now would be a good time to replace U-joints too.

5) The swap can definitely be done on the cheap, if that is your goal. The biggest expense is going to be the tune if you don't already have one. You will need to turn off all the auto trans functions in the ECM, otherwise you will have a check engine light and some part throttle drivability issues. Search around on craigslist and you can usually find a T45 trans for under $250 including the clutch fork and driveshaft yoke. Make sure to get the clutch fork and the driveshaft yoke with it, otherwise each of those will cost another $50 or so. You will need a flywheel at about $90 and a clutch kit at about $150 for a stock type clutch. Figure $50 for a driveshaft from a u-pull-it yard, SC clutch pedal goes for about $100 on these forums, and make sure to get the master cylinder and fluid reservoir with the pedal. An S10 slave cylinder (the way I did my swap) is $50 at advance auto parts. The hydraulic line will probably cost about $25 to make. A short throw shifter is another $150. The correct speedo gear will be about $10. The reason for the different speedo gear is that the 4R70 uses a 7 tooth drive gear and the T45 uses an 8 tooth drive gear. If you do the swap and re-use your current drive gear, your speedometer will read faster than you are actually going. After that, all you need is misc. bolts, fluids, RTV, shift boot type stuff. If you keep an eye out for good deals, you can definitely do the swap for under $1000, not counting the tune.
 

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1) If you get a T45 out of a GT, the trans mount will be in the exact same location as the 4R70 mount, so you won't have to modify the trans crossmember in any way.
Good info to know respectirocz's cut looked a little scary to me thats why I was asking if it got reinforced later.
2) I'm not sure exactly what cover you ar talking about, but I nad no clearance issues with a T45 swap with stock exhaust on either my 94 Cougar or my 98 MarkVIII.
respectirocz was saying he had to cut a chunk out of the bottom on his to clear but I think that had to do with the hydrolic throw out bearing he was using.
3) Just use the stock auto console. Once the auto shifter itself is removed, there is nothing in that area. Just center the rear shifter in the middle of that hole, and get a leather shifter boot and glue it to the underside of the console top, and when you are all done, it will look factory.
Makes sense I haven't had to take apart my console before so I wasn't sure if the shifter was glued or what or if it would look funny.
4) A stock steel crown vic driveshaft will be the correct length, and is your best bet if you are doing the swap on a budget. The aluminum CVPI driveshaft is actually an inch too short due to the extended tailshaft on the 4R70 used in police cars. To get an aluminum driveshaft in there, it will need to be custom made. If going with the crown vic steel driveshaft, all you need to do is swap out the front yoke for the T45 one, and swap the rear flange for the stock MN12 one. Now would be a good time to replace U-joints too.
Gotcha I wasn't clear on what respectirocz was talking about with a conversion part. I thought he was saying the u-joint caps were different it sounds pretty straight forward though the way you explained it.

5) The swap can definitely be done on the cheap, if that is your goal. The biggest expense is going to be the tune if you don't already have one. You will need to turn off all the auto trans functions in the ECM, otherwise you will have a check engine light and some part throttle drivability issues. Search around on craigslist and you can usually find a T45 trans for under $250 including the clutch fork and driveshaft yoke. Make sure to get the clutch fork and the driveshaft yoke with it, otherwise each of those will cost another $50 or so. You will need a flywheel at about $90 and a clutch kit at about $150 for a stock type clutch. Figure $50 for a driveshaft from a u-pull-it yard, SC clutch pedal goes for about $100 on these forums, and make sure to get the master cylinder and fluid reservoir with the pedal. An S10 slave cylinder (the way I did my swap) is $50 at advance auto parts. The hydraulic line will probably cost about $25 to make. A short throw shifter is another $150. The correct speedo gear will be about $10. The reason for the different speedo gear is that the 4R70 uses a 7 tooth drive gear and the T45 uses an 8 tooth drive gear. If you do the swap and re-use your current drive gear, your speedometer will read faster than you are actually going. After that, all you need is misc. bolts, fluids, RTV, shift boot type stuff. If you keep an eye out for good deals, you can definitely do the swap for under $1000, not counting the tune.
I am defiantly thinking on the cheap lol.
Is the retune absolutely necessary? What kind of part throttle drivablity? like a stumble? I have no idea on the cost of that I would assume 2 to 300 easy for a chip and custom tune.
When you are talking about the SC clutch pedal do you mean the set or literally just the pedal costing around 100?
What year S10 slave are you using?
Other than the obvious better feel is there any reason I could not use a stock shifter? I would think they would be way cheaper from a junk yard and I could always upgrade later and save the initial 150 for the clutch.

I know I am asking a lot of questions but you've done this already and I am trying to get all the info I can before I even think of turning a bolt. This is my daily driver and I can't afford to dump 1000 into it and then not have a car.
 

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The drivability issues will basically be power dropping out then coming back on. Basically the computer is messing with timing curves based on when it thinks it has to shift, and it just feels really weird. Plus without the tune, you would have a bunch of transmission codes, which would cause a check engine light. That alone would bug the hell out of me enough to get the tune. For a basic tune from SCT, you are probably looking about $350 including the chip.

For the SC clutch pedal, you need the pedal assembly with the bracket out of any year SC. For your brake pedal, it is easier just trim down the pedal pad on your stock pedal. Like I said, you can usually find someone selling an SC clutch pedal assembly for around $100.

The S10 slave is for a 94/95 4-cyl S10 pickup. It can be had new from Advance Auto Parts for about $50, or from a chevy dealer for about $65.

For the shifter, upgrading later would be a lot more involved because the floor will prevent you from just unbolting it and removing it. You would have to lower the back end of the trans, which probably means dropping the exhaust and the fuel tank. Plus with the remote shifter linkage, it loses some of the feel, so having that short throw shifter keeps it from being too sloppy. Plus you would have to buy another shifter anyway to use as the rear remote mount one, so you might as well spend the money now on a good one and not have to deal with it again. Personally, I am a fan of the Steeda TriAx, but there are other good aftermarket shifters as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
To start off, I didn't even realize there were more replies to this thread, I didn't get any notification email. Sorry about that.
So the car has been on the road for a couple of months and I can report on the success of the swap and it's little bugs.

Glad to see another one on the road. The reason I didn't do the shifter extension like you was I was concerned that unless the motor and trans are rigidly mounted, any movement in the driveline would be transmitted to the front shifter, but not the rear, and I was worried about it throwing the car out of gear when you hit a bump or something like that. Let me know how it works out for you, cause that would definitely make it simpler to seal up the floor if you only had one hold to cover instead of 2. For the link bar between the 2, I revised that setup with the angle iron, and instead I used an old jack handle that I had laying around, and I notched both sides to clear the shifters, and then I did like you said with double-nutting the bolts to prevent it backing out. The other thing I did was after it was all together, I put some butyl on there cause every so often at particular rpms I would get a rattle that just drove me nuts.
I wasn't concerned about the movement in the drivetrain causing the front shifter to move but not the rear causing it to pop out of gear because the dummy shifter moves with the real shifter very well. All movement is translated well with little to no slack. We did run into an issue with the linkage between the dummy shifter and the real shifter.
Since the shift linkage would have to pivot around the bolts, I knew it would eventually loosen the bolt. So I wanted to loctite the bolt but I didn't want to make it so tight that the friction between the angle iron linkage and the shifter would make it stiff to shift so I thought maybe some anti-sieze would work as a lubricant.
This set up did not work very well at all. We tried double-nutting on the end of a longer bolt with loctite but there was no way to get it to rotate easily but still be tight.
So we decided to use thrust bearings.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/DYNAROLL-Thrust-Bearing-1ZGB4?Pid=search
We used 4 thrust bearings and put it together in the following order: Bolt, Thrust bearing, Shift Linkage, Thrust bearing, Shifter, Second nut.
The bolt we used was something like 2 inches long, maybe 2.5 The point was that the thrust bearing can support the load when we tighten the bolt and still allow the shift linkage to pivot as it needed to.
So we used 2 thrust bearings by the dummy shifter and 2 thrust bearings by the real shifter and the shift rod/linkage/angle iron works just fine. No problems after using this set up. We also cleaned up all the anti-sieze and reapplied loctite.

One thing I should note, after using this thrust bearing set up, we have had no issues with shifting into gear or any resistance in the shifter however medicalmike has mentioned that if he hits a particularly nasty bump in brooklyn while coasting it will pop out of gear. Not while accelerating and not during normal driving. I believe this problem isn't so much with the shifter or the fact that it's attached to the auto-plate. I think it is probably from worn synchro insert keys. Not sure yet. It hasn't caused any dangerous situation because it's not while accelerating and it only happens at slow speeds over bumps.

I was actually more concerned with flex in the auto plate. I never actually thought about driveline movement, but thats a good point. Maybe the solution would be to leave the angle iron bolted and shifter bolted to the trans and make a hole in the auto plate and seal that up. it would make the area you need to seal a heck of alot smaller thats for sure.
That might work better for you. One problem you will have is that when the dummy shifter is bolted directly to the angle iron and to the transmission it is a little bit lower than the set up we have. The problem with that is the rod that connects the two shifters, or the angle iron, will interfere with the auto shifter plate and the rubber boot. So I don't think it will work but if you get it to work I'd love to see pictures.

So how does it run any updates or refinements? I considered doing this swap 2 years ago when my 4r70 needed a rebuild and decided against it due to all the BS of welding together a new extension box onto the trans ect.... Looks like you guys came up with a easier way to do this. I do have a few questions for you thought about this swap.

1. The cut cross member for the trans are there any concerns about strength? looking at your pics it seems really flimsy where it mounts at the end.
2. The bottom cover you had to cut a chunk out of to cleat the cat I'm assuming this was due to the third cat in the system where it acts as a Y-Pipe in the stock setup?
3. What center console are you using the stock automatic with the auto guts removed or a SC stick center console?
4. and lastly if I am understanding correctly the stock drive shaft out of a crownvic with the t45 yoke is the proper lenth for this swap. Also on that am I to understand you used the new caps on the old joint and it fit properly?
5. Lastly how much do you think you have into this swap?

I've always wanted a stick on my 4.6L these engines love the midrange and just don't wake up till around 3000rpm perfect for a stick shift. With an automatic (at least without a high stall converter) these cars just dog off the line.

One last thing I was thinking about the issue with the speedo being off. Did you change out the pumpkin, gears, or change tire/rim size during the swap? If not it should be dead on still (unless the t45's teeth are different). Maybe the gear you have is slightly different and you can't see it might be worth a shot to just try what warmaster259 said and cut the original down and try it to see if it changes. Shrugs IDK just a thought.
1. No concerns about the strength of the crossmember. We cut a hole into the metal, we didn't cut a notch into it. It has not shown any flex with the weight of the transmission and the last time I was under the car I didn't see anything to be concerned about.
We got our t45 from a 96 mustang GT I believe and the mount was not in the exact same location as the auto trans. It was about an inch or 2 farther back.

2. The chunk was cut out of the dust cover for the clutch cable. Since we weren't using a clutch cable and we decided to use the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing we wanted to put the dust cover to protect the hydraulic cables. The dust cover interfered with the first cat on the drivers side. The primary cat. I trimmed the cover to clear the cat but it continued to rattle. In the end we ditched it completely and drive the car without the dust cover.

3. We kept the stock center console from the car, we removed the auto shifter which left a nice clean hole for the manual shifter. We used a leather boot from an 05-06 mustang GT and it fits in the hole nicely. We did not glue it or secure it to the console, it just sits there and you don't really notice that it is not attached.

4. Yes, the crown vic driveshaft (not the interceptor) is the correct length and it only needs the proper splined slip yoke to fit inside the transmission. We had a problem with the first driveshaft we got, apparently the U-joint caps were too long and stuck out too far so we couldn't fit the retaining clips in. We ended up damaging that driveshaft with out liberal use of a big f'n hammer and had to get a second crown vic driveshaft. The second one went together perfectly and fit perfectly but we didn't notice it was dented in 2 places and that caused a real bad vibration. So we took the original cougar driveshaft, went to a driveshaft shop, gave him the length we needed and he trimmed down the original cougar driveshaft, balanced it and put the slip yoke on. In the end getting the cougar driveshaft trimmed down was cheaper than buying the 2 driveshafts. Lesson learned.

5. How much money into the swap? You have to ask medicalmike to be sure since it's his car and he funded the project. I honestly don't even remember.

As for the speedo. The 4R70 uses a 7 tooth speedo drive gear whereas the t45 uses an 8 tooth speedo drive gear. The speedometer will be off. My suggestion is while you have the t-45 out of the car it would probably be easier to buy a new 7 tooth drive gear, take off the transmission tailshaft housing and swap the 8 tooth gear for the 7 tooth gear.
The t45's tailshaft housing isn't terribly difficult to take apart, once you remove the shifter theres a little linkage that connects the shifter to the shift rod and it's held on with a roll pin. Use a punch to remove the roll pin, slide the linkage off the rod, unbolt the speedo driven gear and the tailshaft housing and it slides right out. On the mainshaft, you'll see a plastic gear held on with a clip. That's your speedo drive gear.
We didn't know we would have a problem or that we could solve it this way until after the transmission was in the car and once it is in there you dont really want to remove it.
So what we did was we got the second biggest speedo gear available and it got the speedo down to the correct reading. We left the differential alone for now but that's going to change soon.

1) If you get a T45 out of a GT, the trans mount will be in the exact same location as the 4R70 mount, so you won't have to modify the trans crossmember in any way.

2) I'm not sure exactly what cover you ar talking about, but I nad no clearance issues with a T45 swap with stock exhaust on either my 94 Cougar or my 98 MarkVIII.
Our transmission was from a mustang gt and it was an inch or so back. I don't know why.
The clearance issue we had was becaus we were trying to reuse the dust cover. Since you used the s-10 slave cylinder you weren't using the dust cover so thats probably why you didnt have a clearance issue. We ditched the dust cover anyway so it doesnt really matter.

Gotcha I wasn't clear on what respectirocz was talking about with a conversion part. I thought he was saying the u-joint caps were different it sounds pretty straight forward though the way you explained it.


I am defiantly thinking on the cheap lol.
Is the retune absolutely necessary? What kind of part throttle drivablity? like a stumble? I have no idea on the cost of that I would assume 2 to 300 easy for a chip and custom tune.
When you are talking about the SC clutch pedal do you mean the set or literally just the pedal costing around 100?
What year S10 slave are you using?
Other than the obvious better feel is there any reason I could not use a stock shifter? I would think they would be way cheaper from a junk yard and I could always upgrade later and save the initial 150 for the clutch.

I know I am asking a lot of questions but you've done this already and I am trying to get all the info I can before I even think of turning a bolt. This is my daily driver and I can't afford to dump 1000 into it and then not have a car.
I don't know why we had an issue with the U-joint but thats all the issue was, the U-joint. The crown vic driveshaft was the correct length and the yoke was correct we just couldn't get them together.
Medicalmike says the tune was definitely necessary, the phantom automatic transmission won't let the car perform the way you want it to.
As for the pedals, We found it so much easier to put the pedal in place when we took out the dashboard. Sure it seems crazy but believe me I do not regret it.
We opted for the performance short shifter right away for 2 reasons. First off we needed 2 shifters anyway to do the whole dummy shifter set up and the transmission came with the oem shifter so we needed to buy one shifter anyway and secondly, it's too difficult to swap in a short throw shifter after the transmission is in so rather than regret it later it made more sense to do it now.

This was medicalmikes dailydriver before we started the swap but he made sure he had a solid month where he didn't need the car just for us to do the swap.
Plan ahead.

The last thing I wanted to mention about our swap is the use of the SC master cylinder and the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing.
The hydraulic throwout bearing does not provide enough hydraulic advantage when paired with the SC master cylinder. If you have ever pressed the clutch pedal of a car with a stage 3 clutch/pressure plate, this pedal is stiffer than that. This car only has a stage 1 clutch/pressure plate but the pedal is ridiculously stiff. I have done plenty of clutches in my life and I have never felt a pedal so stiff. So if the S10 slave gives a good feel, go with that. We may be looking to get a smaller master cylinder or a bigger hydraulic throwout bearing because the pedal requires so much force that you can actually watch the firewall deflect about half an inch when he presses the pedal.
 

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Oh you kids and your wimpy T-45's, ya'll should try stepping up to the TR-3650 mile high club ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well when we do 3.73's and traclok, and the speedcal with it, then switching over to a TR-3650 is no big deal but we might as well switch to a TR-6060 at that point.
 

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Oh you kids and your wimpy T-45's, ya'll should try stepping up to the TR-3650 mile high club ;)
You enjoy your more complex expensive if I break down it'll be a couple weeks finding new parts before I can drive again setup. I'll take cheap easy and works just fine. When you get enough power to break a T-45 then you can brag about having the 3650. :tongue:

Also you should check the number under your name next to the part that says age, before you goin callin anyone kid, kid. Now that said, play some Slayer!!!!! :headbang:
 

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You enjoy your more complex expensive if I break down it'll be a couple weeks finding new parts before I can drive again setup. I'll take cheap easy and works just fine. When you get enough power to break a T-45 then you can brag about having the 3650. :tongue:

Also you should check the number under your name next to the part that says age, before you goin callin anyone kid, kid. Now that said, play some Slayer!!!!! :headbang:
BAHAHAHA! PLAY SOME F***ING SLAYERRR!!!! that was hilarious Jim, I'll never forget it and neither will Mike...along with...MERCON TAKE ME AWAYY!!! haha. Yeah I was joking so yeah! Slow your roll!
 

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I like my automatic and that sweet smelling juice that flows within it:D

Mercon 5, take me awayyyyyyyyy!













:zwall:

On that note, play some f***ing Slayer!!!!!:headbang:
 
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