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Discussion Starter #1
DTC34: DRIVER SIDE AIR BAG CIRCUIT LOW RESISTANCE OR SHORTED

So, is it best to leave this alone and live with it or take it somewhere? From what I read, it would seem the air bag module is going bad.

I did not see where anyone mentioned in the threads what to actually do other than test the resistance of the two connectors.

Is this something can be replaced?

My apologies if this is in the wrong forum.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It could also be a short in the clockspring
I saw that in another post. Is there a way to test that? Is the air bag assembly anyway tied into the Powertrain Control Module Relay? Mine is busted up from an accident and over the years is showing more and more signs of deterioration. So I wonder if the airbag relay is causing the errors.
 

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1997 Thunderbird LX
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I started getting air bag codes a couple of years ago. Turned out to be a bad module, you can always pull it out and open it up. Mine had a burn on the circuit board.

Joe
 

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1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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No it’s not related to that relay, and there is no airbag relay. The code is being thrown for a reason, if it were anything but an issue detected in the driver side circuit it would be throwing a corresponding code for that fault. The airbag module isn’t dumb, even if itself is the culprit causing the detected short within it. When you say it was busted up in an accident did the bags go off and bags and sensors were replaced only? If so I would be highly suspect of the module AND the clockspring, as there is enough kickback in the airbags going off to damage it, the cruise buttons and horn pads.

To test the clockspring you can use a multimeter to check continuity on each end of the circuit - the Individual pins in the connectorthat connects to the airbag and the connector that connects to the dash under the column behind the knee panel. You can go one further and check the other end of the dash connector and the module connector to rule out the entire wired circuit. If that checks out, and the clockspring checks out it’s probably the module that’s bad.

It probably goes without saying but whatever you do do not test the resistance of the airbag itself
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome responses, thanks ALL!

Last stupid question... where is the module located?

No it’s not related to that relay, and there is no airbag relay. The code is being thrown for a reason, if it were anything but an issue detected in the driver side circuit it would be throwing a corresponding code for that fault. The airbag module isn’t dumb, even if itself is the culprit causing the detected short within it. When you say it was busted up in an accident did the bags go off and bags and sensors were replaced only? If so I would be highly suspect of the module AND the clockspring, as there is enough kickback in the airbags going off to damage it, the cruise buttons and horn pads.

To test the clockspring you can use a multimeter to check continuity on each end of the circuit - the Individual pins in the connectorthat connects to the airbag and the connector that connects to the dash under the column behind the knee panel. You can go one further and check the other end of the dash connector and the module connector to rule out the entire wired circuit. If that checks out, and the clockspring checks out it’s probably the module that’s bad.

It probably goes without saying but whatever you do do not test the resistance of the airbag itself
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh, and the car was crashed 25 years ago. I happened on the relay module when cleaning out the air filter box and was replacing the coil. I noticed the relay module was bent in several areas and suspect was hit on the passenger side, front. I do believe the crash sensors were replaced. They should have replaced the module too... oh well, I digress.

I have been thinking that with the corners, sides exposed somewhat, have over the years collected dirt and grime and the module is acting up causing issues with starting. I have replaced everything else related to the ignition over the years and that is the last culprit to the issue. (ignition key turns, clicks and nothing, try again a few times and it starts). I was surprised it was bent up and not replaced 25 years ago.

Otherwise, no issues with air bag or related components till now.
 

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1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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The airbag module is the bright blue box behind the glove box on the side of the dash frame. If the bags blew in its lifetime it’s probably the problem, but I’d still check the clockspring for damage, at least visually to see if there is any cracked, smooshed, melted plastic from the incident

It won’t solve the airbag code but I would definitely find a new IRCM regardless by the sounds of it, even without damage like that the relays can wear with age and cause problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you XR7. I have been looking at the IRCM: Do I get a used one from the yard for dirt cheap and hope for the best, get one on eBay or buy a new one at a ridiculous price that is "re-manufactured? Decisions, decisions. I always like going to the yard and it is relativity safe from the virus there. I will see the prices to replace everything (just for top dollar out of pocket) and used prices and accessibility.

Thanks again to everyone that submitted their comments and suggestions.
 
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