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No this is not a question about what the codes are :), but i was curious every so often it will flash a code and if i turn my car off it goes away. Could there be a bad connection somewere that gets faulty or something. It just happens randomly and not everytime i start it. I believe the code 32 and sometimes 23 flash if i can remember :) bad memory
 

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:D I'll let you decide if it's a bad connection! From the 1994 Service Manual:

Diagnostic Trouble Code 23


Safing Sensor Circuit Input Feed/Return Circuit Open


Normal Operation

Battery voltage is provided at air bag diagnostic monitor Pin 15 (Circuit 611, W/O) at all times. However, voltage at Pin 15 can be as high as 25 volts (as provided by the back-up power supply) when the ignition switch is in RUN and the back up power supply in the air bag diagnostic monitor is charged up. Circuit 612 (P/O) is connected to Circuit 611 (W/O) inside the LH kick panel safing sensor. Therefore, the voltage at Pin 23 (Circuit 612, P/O) should be the same as the voltage at Pin 15 (Circuit 611, W/O) at all times. The air bag diagnostic monitor compares the voltage available at Pins 15 and 23. If the voltage at Pin 15 (Circuit 611, W/O) is normal and the voltage at Pin 23 (Circuit 612, P/O) is low, the air bag diagnostic monitor will flash out code 23 to indicate an open between these two circuits.


Possible Causes

Low voltage at Pin 23 can be caused by:

1. An open circuit in the wiring harness in either Circuit 611 (W/O) or 612 (P/O).

2. An open circuit inside the LH kick panel safing sensor across Circuits 611 (W/O) and 612 (P/O).




Diagnostic Trouble Code 32


Driver Side Air Bag Circuit High Resistance or Open


Normal Operation

The air bag diagnostic monitor measures the resistance across Pin 10 (Circuit 615, GY/W) and Pin 11 (Circuit 614, GY/O) every time the ignition switch is turned to RUN. Normal resistance across these circuits is between 1.5 ohm and 2.0 ohms. This resistance comes from the air bag itself (approximately 1.0 ohm) and the air bag sliding contacts windings (approximately 0.25 to 0.5 ohm per winding, two windings in all). If the resistance across these two circuits exceeds 4.0 ohms, the air bag diagnostic monitor will flash code 32.

NOTE:
The connectors for the driver side air bag module assembly and the air bag sliding contact have metal spring clips that act as shorting bars. These shorting bars are built into the plastic hardshell connectors. The shorting bars are designed to short Circuits 614 and 615 together when the connectors are not mated. DO NOT attempt to remove the air bag shorting bar and measure the resistance of the air bag.

The air bag sliding contact shorting bar may be removed to measure the air bag sliding contact resistance. Use extreme care when reinstalling the shorting bar to ensure it is installed correctly.


Possible Causes

Excessive resistance across Pins 10 and 11 can be caused by:

1. A poor connection where the air bag sliding contact connects into the main wiring harness. The air bag sliding contact connector at the base of the steering column may have excessive resistance between the male and female terminals in the connector or across the terminal crimps.

2. An open circuit or high resistance in the air bag sliding contact windings inside the air bag sliding contact.

3. An open circuit or high resistance in the wiring harness in either Circuit 614 (GY/O) or Circuit 615 (GY/W).

4. An open circuit or high resistance in the driver side air bag module. DO NOT attempt a direct resistance measurement of the driver side air bag module. Follow the diagnostic procedures to determine if the driver air bag resistance is higher than normal.
 
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