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Replacing 2 of the 3 airconditioning lines with the new Aeroquip teflon steel braided lines. One line was the liquid line from the condensor to the evaporator. I didn't realize there was a filter/checkvalve on one end of that original line. Is this filter/checkvalve important and can be used without. I already threw out the original line but could go to the junkyard or go to ford for another. Just don't know if it will fit on the new steel braided line. Hopefully I can run line without any damage to the a/c system. What do you think? This is on a 93 5.0.
 

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Just curious where you bought the line and how much did you pay? Do they hood right up to the factory ports? Do they still use the o-ring connectors? I would like to get some.
 

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bad93bird,
You can get most of the stuff through the summitt parts catalog. They supply the whole Aeroquip catalog. They also have the russell springlock fittings(same as fuel fittings) The hose end fittings that Aeroquip sells with the a/c lines do not have the right ends for the russel fittings but they sell the right fittings within the catalog. They do not have the right female end to the spring lock though so I cut the original ones off the line and found a set of female springlock fittings( ronmorrisperformance.com) with ends that were not useful to me. I cut and welded them together back to back so that all I needed was the male russell fittings to hook up. A little bit of a pain but workable. I did not replace the low pressure line so I had to get a R134 adapter for it. The aeroquip lines come with a high side r134 already on it(remember not the one shown on the catalog picture- they have the right fitting with a high pressure port within the cataog). Also, the russel fittings have the wrong orings on it. You will have to go to ford to get the correct ac orings. Ford told me the orings aren't made green anymore like all the books say but they are still specific ac orings. I will take some pictures once the ac is recharged and all in. Though it sounds simple it was tough finding all the part numbers and correct sizing. It is getting easier now though. Hope this helps.
 

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John said:
One line was the liquid line from the condensor to the evaporator. I didn't realize there was a filter/checkvalve on one end of that original line. Is this filter/checkvalve important and can be used without.
Was it in between the liquid line and the evaporator (at the connector)? It was probably the orifice tube. This meters the liquid refrigerant entering the evaporator so it can boil at an even rate. It also maintains the pressure difference between the two sides because there is a pressure drop across the orifice tube.

I'm not sure whether the system will work without it. The compressor clutch cycles according to operating pressure and temperature ranges on the suction side to keep the evaporator in an ideal temperature range. The compressor turns on a certain pressure and turns off at a certain temperature. So the clutch may just stay on longer? :zdunno:

You can tell if you have an orifice tube system, which I think all our cars have, if the accumulator/drier is on the low pressure side, after the evaporator. The other type of system has the drier on the high pressure system with an expansion valve that meters flow.
 
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