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Discussion Starter #1
Ive been thinking, for a while now, of getting a motorcycle. But not sure what a good deal on one would be or what a good size one would be for me.

I have a little experience riding Dirt bikes, so have a basic concept of how to ride them, just haven't ridden a road bike before.

The major reason i want one is for fuel efficiency, not so much for going super fast or hot rodding around town. Would be nice to have a 2nd seat on it too. I was looking around at 'crochrockets' cause ive heard they are more efficient. Im just trying to avoid the Really powerful ones. Been looking at spending less than 2-3k if possible.

Anyone have any ideas?
 

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Timber,

Here are a couple of things to consider. If you are going to be doing a fair bit of riding like I do (45 mile commute one way, mostly freeway), you will NOT want a bike smaller than 500cc's. This is mainly to combat getting blown around on the freeway.

That being said, if you do primarily in town stuff, you can go 250cc or higher.

I'm going to be getting either a Yamaha YZF600R (apx 55-60 mpg), or a Suzuki GSX650F (apx the same mpg). Both are full fairing bikes (look like crotch rockets), but don't have the race bike price tag, nor the race bike insurance rates. Both also have a FULL seat (not a split) and are more comfortable if you are taking a passenger.

If you get a 250, you are going to be looking at closer to 60-80 mpg.

I am in the same boat with you on price range for my first bike, and based on all of my research either of the two that I have mentioned are great starter bikes. Now the Suzuki since it just came out in 2008 is higher priced than the Yamaha (which stopped production of the YZF600R in 2007), but you could probably find a used one during the winter months for a good price.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, the majority of the time ill be riding around in town, but i do work about 30+ miles way on the weekend, and my parents live about that far as well. But i imagine id proly want to take a car for both of those, not sure tho. Tho when i drive to work on the weekends, its just on a state road.

Thanks for the info.
 

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Baby Huey
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Buy something fairly cheap so your not going to worry about dropping it. Something like a 600 Katana would be a great starter sport bike.
 

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I like my 250, but not for riding around the mountains. It would only go about 65 uphill, so the Harleys were leaving me behind with them going 80-85.

It was good. I got a little over 50, but I had to put it in fourth gear at 11k RPMs to keep it going 70 uphill.

I love it, but I definitely want bigger! I may get a cruiser, like a Yamaha, down the road, but we'll see how funds are. Either goes to cars, off-road toys, or bike.

I've got a little over $2000 in it after buying it and fixing some stuff. Still needs the front fairing replaced, and some little stuff, but for riding around, it's great on gas. Insurance is like $100 for a year, and I don't even need it up here, or a helmet.


Good padding and a cheap first bike are definitely a must for beginners! If you've got some experience, I'd recommend a 500 or 600. Something you aren't as likely to kill yourself on with having some experience as compared to a 750 or 1000+. I buy all my stuff on CraigsList, so check around there for a month or so. I definitely don't regret getting my bike. One of my better choices in life.
 

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If you are on the fence about getting a bike, that the Motorcycle Safety Course. It's a 2 day course and it will help you decide which way to go. I have been riding for over 10 years, the MSF course taught me more in 2 days then I ever though possible. Plus, it takes the place of the driver test for the DMV.
 

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Clueless Poster
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i got a dirt bike that keeps me occupied. i dont have the need for a street bike though i got my tbird
 

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I like my 250, but not for riding around the mountains. It would only go about 65 uphill, so the Harleys were leaving me behind with them going 80-85.
It was good. I got a little over 50, but I had to put it in fourth gear at 11k RPMs to keep it going 70 uphill.


you might wanna have that thing checked out then cuz i got a ninja 250 too (2006) and i can cruise curves and hills all day at 80. check your valves and sync your carbs and get k&n filters and rejet that thing and you'll think you got a whole new bike. before i did my valves and synced my carbs mine would only hit 90 on flat road and that was pushin it after i did those carbs and valves it has enough power to go all the way to the rev limiter at 110. and i got a 42 tooth rear sprocket coming that wil change the gear ratio enough you can pull 120-125 and not even redline it. and your highway rpms are dropped about 2500 so you get better gas mileage too.
 

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I'm not really talking hills, more like, mountains. Have the runaway truck lane on the side, steep grade signs, the works.

Basically mine does sound like yours, only hits 90, and does 100 downhill. I just can't see spending the money on it when it has other damage from getting laid down. I'll replace the clutch lever and bar end that I messed up, but most people figure mechanical isn't something they see and won't pay extra for that, just what others compare in looks. I already have a couple people that wanna buy it. A guy told me yesterday if he sees it on CraigsList before I give him a chance to buy it, he's kicking my a$$. So I figure I have it sold, I just have to wait for some money so I can pay for a good bike. Looking at a RoadStar or something in the Yamaha lineup. I'm not gonna do a Sportster. The 1200 was nice, but I want a big bike that makes me look skinny, and I need something in the $5000 or less lineup, since I haven't paid that much for a vehicle as of yet, and there's only about 5 riding months, so kinda screwed there.

'98 or '99 RoadStar I got to ride, with quad exhaust (don't have a pic of the other side, sorry):


'05 or '06 I think Sportster 1200 I got to ride:


Hated to tell the guy I liked the RoadStar better than the Sportster. His fiance bought her green Sportster when she worked at HD. The whole house payments and car/motorcycle payments thing kinda scares me, even though I pay rent. I just like to save up and pay cash for my vehicles.
 

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i got a 08 650r ninja as my first bike. I love it... I was thinking in getting the 250r, but but i am a big guy and i commute everyday to work 70 miles a days..

I prefered to have a new bike because you never know how the riders treated the used bikes, but if you want something to practice on, get a used bike.

PLEASE make sure you take the MSF course. DO NOT GET ON A BIKE IF YOU HAVE NOT TAKEN THE COURSE..
 

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Pedal Faster
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I prefered to have a new bike because you never know how the riders treated the used bikes, but if you want something to practice on, get a used bike.
I think that's really especially true with inexpensive crotch rockets. Kids get ahold of those things and abuse the daylights out of them.
 

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A 600 sportbike is way to much for a new rider.

Pick up a 250 or a 500. Use it for a season to learn (the road) then sell it. The resale market is excellent for these, you won't lose a dime. Then go buy a 600.

Enjoy,
Jim

I have a few bikes myself. Something for every occasion.

'74 CB550
'79 CB750L
'80 Cb750F
'80 CB750F
'82 CB750F
'82 CB900F
'83 CB1100F
'83 CB1100F
'92 Bandit
'99 R1
'02 Shadow
 

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Pedal Faster
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Hey, that's where I know you from, you post over at cb1100f.net. I've been lurking there for a few months since I bought my '82 900f in May. Cool to see another f'er.
 

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A 600 sportbike is way to much for a new rider.

I have to disagree with you. It all depends on how big you are and how much do you commute. If you are 6'3, 250lbs, a 250cc with do NADA for you, a 500cc would still be not that good, that's why I went for the 650R. Now, if you are small skinny dude, then yeah, a 500cc would be good, I think even a 250cc, but there are limitation as too how much you can do. With the 250cc you would have to be in the 8k rpm range and up always. With my 650, I am always at 5k and it's more than enough for me, I never go above 5k..
 

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A 600 sportbike is way to much for a new rider.

Pick up a 250 or a 500. Use it for a season to learn (the road) then sell it. The resale market is excellent for these, you won't lose a dime. Then go buy a 600.

Enjoy,
Jim


I agree and disagree with that. It really comes down to the rider. If the rider is immature, then yes, a 600 is way too much for them. If they are serious about riding, can ride without their head shoved up their arse, then they should be fine with a 600. Suzuki has a new thing that they put on their new bikes, there is a selection switch on the handlebar that has A,B, and C. You can basically detune the bike on the fly. It lowers the RPM's so you can't go too fast too soon. It allows you to get a 750, and ride it like a 600. When you are ready, you can witch it to the full power mode.

Like I said before, take the MSF course. It will help you decide whether or not you want a bike. Good luck.
 

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I have to disagree with you. It all depends on how big you are and how much do you commute. If you are 6'3, 250lbs, a 250cc with do NADA for you, a 500cc would still be not that good, that's why I went for the 650R. Now, if you are small skinny dude, then yeah, a 500cc would be good, I think even a 250cc, but there are limitation as too how much you can do. With the 250cc you would have to be in the 8k rpm range and up always. With my 650, I am always at 5k and it's more than enough for me, I never go above 5k..
It's funny you should mention that...

I'm 6'3" and 250lbs

I occasionally ride a Honda CX500 Custom. It's more than enough engine for around town and even interstate, but the bike isn't really big enough for extended interstate travel, and the gearing is a little low (it tops out at 95 due to redline).

I do wish the bike was a little bigger, but the engine is great. It's a little Vtwin that pulls from idle all the way to 10,000rpm.
 

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I'm 5' 11" 220lbs and learned to ride on the street on my '83 XL250R dual sport. It would top out at about 73 or 74 mph, was super light and nimble (at least compared to my 900), and was a great beginner bike. I think your first bike should be as small and nimble as you can be comfortable with until you really start to get the hang of predicting what traffic is going to do, how to react and all of that "6th sense" stuff that just comes with riding for a while. The worst things that you can do are be overconfident or be under confident. You have to be 100% comfortable on the bike and confident that you can handle any situation that arises, but not so foolish as to think that you're invincible. That's why I think that a smaller bike is better as a starter, it's just more forgiving of small mistakes right off the bat.
 

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He was mature enough to ask for a recomondation. He seems like a bright guy.

Thats not the concern. I would be more concerned with the learning curve. A small bike will build confidance and excellent skills fast. Then transitioning to a bigger bike you will continue to improve. This applies to both the traffic and the twisties.

I know people that have started on 250's to 1000's. The better ridders are the ones that started on the 250's (skill wise). The weight is more manageable, and of couse the power won't get you in trouble.

I was not the rider that started on the 250, and I regret it now.

Whatever you decide have fun and be safe!



Hey Josh-
Introduce yourself over there and post a pic! Lots of good info & people.

Jim
 

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He was mature enough to ask for a recomondation. He seems like a bright guy.

Thats not the concern. I would be more concerned with the learning curve. A small bike will build confidance and excellent skills fast. Then transitioning to a bigger bike you will continue to improve. This applies to both the traffic and the twisties.

I know people that have started on 250's to 1000's. The better ridders are the ones that started on the 250's (skill wise). The weight is more manageable, and of couse the power won't get you in trouble.

I was not the rider that started on the 250, and I regret it now.

Whatever you decide have fun and be safe!



Hey Josh-
Introduce yourself over there and post a pic! Lots of good info & people.

Jim
I started on bicycles :tongue:

Actually, I think it helped a lot. Then again, I also grew up driving three-wheelers and other powered vehicles, so a motorcycle seemed like second nature the first time I drove a real one.
 
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