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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking about installing a relay box that keeps the low beams on with the highs. This is on a 1993 that has the 9006 low and 9005 high beam. The one I am considering is The Brite Box, which keep the low beams on, when you activate the high beams. It takes the 12v direct from the battery voltage, which puts full voltage to the lights, and also prevents overloading the light switch.

I was wondering if any of you have installed one of these before? How complicated was it to install?
 

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I have a full relay harness; but I discovered it actually made it HARDER to see what was down the road with both low and high on at the same time.

RwP
 

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I installed a Brite Box on my 93 Mark VIII many tears ago. It wasn't that hard as I recall but the details are fuzzy now.

I did it because I switched to the 96 HIDs to keep the HIDs lit when turning on the high beams. I used HIR bulbs for the high beam which made a tremendous improvement in the high beam light output.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks... Ralph, which year do you have? I know when I use the dimmer switch to activate both temporarily, it makes a huge improvement with the 9005/9006 combination.
 

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Thanks... Ralph, which year do you have? I know when I use the dimmer switch to activate both temporarily, it makes a huge improvement with the 9005/9006 combination.
Actually, no, it doesn't if you're actually driving; it's called Near Field Brightness. You COULD turn the interior light on. It's really bright --- but you don't see squat down the road!

I have a 1991 Cougar with the Grand Marquis headlamps installed. I also have the 9011/9012 upgrade installed.

But I did the testing of low/high both on with my old 2000 Malibu.

RwP
 

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First of all, everyone should most definitely be running relays for both the headlights and high beams, unless you are running LED lights. Running that much current through the switch not only dims the headlights, but also burns out the switch. You don’t need an aftermarket box to do this, it is a very simple circuit. Headlight or high beam signal from the switch goes to terminal 85, terminal 86 goes to ground, 30 goes directly to battery voltage through a fuse, and 87 goes to the headlights or high beams. Once both relays are wired in this way, all you need to do is run a diode from the 87 terminal on the high beam relay to the 85 terminal on the low beam relay. This will trigger the low beam relay whenever the high beams are on, but since it is a diode, it won’t back feed the high beams when only the low beams are on. All told, it shouldn’t take more than an hour to wire everything up, and probably about $20-25 in relays, relay connectors, and wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good information, thanks
 

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You can go cheaper, if you search, but you don't have to make everything unless you're a totally cheap bastard, like me. :)
I was converting from 9007s to 9005/9006 so I made my own. Also, making your own means you can design wiring to fit exactly how you want.

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Madmikeyl I think I am going to go that route. What diode did you use? Be a nice little project to do after I replace the upper control arms. Seems I tore the boots on them, and may have tweeked them after a wheel stand gone bad. I put the top of the ball joints part way through the top of the inner fender well. :(
 

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Madmikeyl I think I am going to go that route. What diode did you use? Be a nice little project to do after I replace the upper control arms. Seems I tore the boots on them, and may have tweeked them after a wheel stand gone bad. I put the top of the ball joints part way through the top of the inner fender well. :(
Before the relay, a pair of 1N4000 series diodes (I used 1N4007, but that's actually overkill at 1KV. But it's what I carry on my bench for Justin Case).

After the relay - a really REALLY big 40A or larger.

(You want a pair so that the low beams won't turn on the high beams and vice versa.)

You can grab a nice bridge rectifier of 1A or so, 50V or more. Low beam to one of the AC input, high beam to the other one, and the + side to the low beams.

Before you do that ... upgrade to a 9011/9012 pair and the relay, and see if that doesn't do it for you.

https://store.candlepower.com/mohirbuba.html

Also, be sure to clean the headlight lenses. Or replace the assemblies.

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I will draw it up this week and see what I need, and make sure I do not leave anything out. Thanks
 

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I don't know the name or part number of the diodes I use, but they aren't anything heavy duty. By having the diode only trigger the the low beam relay, it isn't subject to much current at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Being a old guy, I do better with pictures, so I drew up the wiring to make sure I have it laid out properly. My control arms will be here Thursday, and I will put them in, then take the Bird out to see how these Silverstar Ultras with new housings do. If I think I want to keep the lows on with the highs, I will go ahead and make up a harness.
 

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I'd add a second diode, to keep the high beams from feeding back into the low beam circuit.

See the slightly modified schematic below.

Actually, I'd run the lower diode to the high beam 85 terminal.

EDIT: You want to use the 87 terminals, not the 87a. Run the other side of the light harness back to ground, not to the 87a contacts.

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I agree, good idea. Thanks
 

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I disagree. The second diode is totally unnecessary. The relays isolate the power feed from the actual lights. Bruce’s diagram is exactly how I have wired this type of thing many times on many different vehicles.
 

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I disagree. The second diode is totally unnecessary. The relays isolate the power feed from the actual lights. Bruce’s diagram is exactly how I have wired this type of thing many times on many different vehicles.
Yes, but the original design DOES back feed the high beam voltage back into the low beam circuit BEFORE the relay.

Whereas it may not show as being different ... it WILL do such nice things as turn the fog lights on also. Which will be illegal (too many lights on the front!).

So the isolation diode, which runs a whopping 10 cents or so if purchased wisely, keeps it legal.

Follow it around again, MadMikeyL.

RwP
 

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If you don’t want the fog lights on, turn the fog light switch off. All the other lights on the car stay on regardless of whether the high beams or low beams are on. And it isn’t the cost of the diode that concerns me, but rather that diodes sometimes do fail, and when they do fail, they usually become an open circuit rather than allowing current both ways. If that happens in the first design, you lose the all lights on at the same time feature, but the headlights and high beams will otherwise work as designed. If that happens in the second design, you lose headlights completely.
 

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No, you don't. You may lose low beams, but not high beams. Two diodes, remember?

I've had more mechanical switches fail than diodes in my years of working with electronics.

*shrug*

Do yours how you want; I'd rather do mine my way.

RwP
 
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