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Discussion Starter #1
I just did the big update that came to me Wednesday. lately, windows and internet explorer have become almost inoperable. i can't read a news story that's maybe ten megabytes without hang ups, long scripts, and reloading a few times. my feelings are it's the 300 megabytes of advertising they jam in with what i wanted to read or see.

I haven't tried the new update much yet, but feel free to write in anything you have noticed about it.
 

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Which OS?
 

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Details my friend, details! Windows 10?

What was the update?
 

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sorry it is 10. i can't find my computer specs and you may have noticed my shift button doesn't work.
 

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i have intel i3 3.4 gigahertz processor and 6 gb memory.

found this by searching for 'system'.

i haven't upgraded this dell pc at all i think it's from 2012, that was the date for the bios.


as far as the update, i haven't noticed much.
 

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i have intel i3 3.4 gigahertz processor and 6 gb memory.

found this by searching for 'system'.

i haven't upgraded this dell pc at all i think it's from 2012, that was the date for the bios.


as far as the update, i haven't noticed much.
There's you're issue.

The I3 isn't a bad processor, but it's not about the processor so much as the hard drive speed these days.

I'd bump up to 8GB ram, set your page file to 12,288mb, and migrate your boot drive to a SSD, then store your personal files (desktop, documents, pictures, etc) on your old hard drive.

The new update overall works ok, but something is dragging your PC down. Are you running Norton or McAfee antivirus? Have a software firewall? Those AV's are performance killers, and software firewalls are useless. You can get a real, hardware firewall for less than $300, or put together a cheap linux box to do the work for you for even less.
 

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sorry it is 10. i can't find my computer specs and you may have noticed my shift button doesn't work.
Buy a new keyboard. They're cheap enough.

Never run more than one antivirus on a computer.
IMHO Norton and McAfee aren't worth the money, Windows Defender (Included with Windows 10) is good enough and it's free. On a side note, we use TrendMicro at work.

Yup, like others have said; it's time to buy a new computer or upgrade the one you have.

In my opinion the minimum system requirements for a modern system are an i5 processor, 8GB minimum of RAM, 16GB of RAM preferred, and a SSD (250 GB minimum, 500GB preferred).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So i checked my page file size and it's at 1664mb. Will that 12,288mb recommendation work with my 6gb memory?

I never changed the page file size. Does it need to be a certain multiple?
 

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The biggest issue is the amount of memory you have vs. the page file size.

Things you can do:
Make Windows 10 performance sing by tweaking RAM, service settings

If you don't want to dump more cash into an old PC (like buying memory that is actually MORE expensive b/c its no longer what's mass produced than what is made today), consider sticking an extra USB stick into your PC and dedicating it to Readyboost. Sure, it ties up a USB port but see commentary in the wikipedia entry about performance boost for low mem systems since you are using the faster flash memory than the HDD.
https://www.winhelp.us/use-readyboost-in-windows-vista-and-7.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReadyBoost


Post up your Dell PC model #; if I have some extra mem laying around that matches your mem spec, I'll drop it in the mail to you. I'm sure others are open to doing the same as well.
Regards,
-g
 

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So i checked my page file size and it's at 1664mb. Will that 12,288mb recommendation work with my 6gb memory?

I never changed the page file size. Does it need to be a certain multiple?
I generally set the page file to 1.5x the physical memory. The 12288 is for 8GB Ram, but yes, it'll work fine with your 6GB. The concept is, instead of letting windows waste clock cycles on expanding/decreasing your page file, set it for a static size so that it will fill/drain it without using any extra processing time on the job. It's a minimal gain, but any gain is an improvement.
 

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I've just went thru and upgraded an older pc to a much better performing system, and the parts were dirt cheap.

Random thoughts:

If you're using a 32 bit version of windows, there are limits: 4GB max memory, and 2TB hard drives are the biggies.
If you have choices of OS systems, and no budget, using the "Server" version ups memory limits, adds more buffers, and is generally more usable for high performance.
You do have to load DirectX to run games, tho. :)

Do this first:

Look up the motherboard number, and search it to find the latest bios and program updates for your system, and save them to a folder on the main drive.

Find the biggest memory module size it will accept, as well as the intel chipset number, and the best 'approved' processor.

If your mobo has features you're not using, like SAS ports, or M.2 ports, buy drives for these instead of a new HD.

Start with a new hard drive for the Boot drive. Unless you want to spend $$, Get a 2TB sata drive, ~$80.

A SSD is much faster, but you need a drive 2x the amount you've used on the current boot drive, and that's pricy.
If your mobo has PCI-e M.2 slots, see if it will boot; that's what you want to use for performance.
Do it if you can. :)

Upgrade Preparation process:

Clone the boot drive to the new drive, and put the old drive away, or just disconnect it.

Boot it, Run everything you need, just to make sure everything copied ok. The old bootable drive we set aside and save just in case. :)

Upgrade the BIOS:

Before a BIOS upgrade, go into the bios setup, and take CLEAR pix of all the settings. Make sure you can read them Before you upgrade, lol.

After a bios upgrade, find the "clear CMOS" jumper and reset the CMOS. That's why you need the pix of all the settings. There's stuff that needs to go before you reboot.

Reboot, go into the bios, and reset all your setting to what they were.

Make sure everything works. :)

Download all the upgrades from the mobo site; add every update that's newer, just make sure it's for your revision mobo.

You may need to reboot a couple of times, and there may be updates that have changed.

Hardware upgrade Prep:
Do a complete backup, and make a bootable recovery disk. :) You have the old copy on the old hard drive in case things go really badly.
Don't sell the older hardware until everything works, lol.

Now you're ready to replace hardware; you have copies, everything is updated to the latest rev, and you have all the capabilities the hardware will support. (That your mobo vendor lets you have, anyway...)

Memory upgrade:
I find the fastest memory it will support; if it has 6 slots, buy 3x new fastest supported 8GB or 16GB sticks instead of adding more, it will run faster.

3x 2GB sticks is actually faster than 1x 8GB stick of the same speed if it's "triple channel memory" supported in the mobo. Maximize the channel count, as they're overlapped clock phase 'channels'.

Add the memory, clear the cmos again, reset the settings again, and reboot.

You should see the new memory in the boot, and windows; in win7, right click 'Computer' and properties will bring up a screen with that info.

I've never used over ~16GB at home, and that was a huge simulation that ran for a day.

Upgrade the Processor:
Look for the best processor that will fit; your mobo ventor will have a list somewhere.

I also check overclocking sites for high core count overclockable xeon processors that are compatible with your mobo chipset. :)

My Latest Upgrade:
I recently upgraded a i7-920 based P6TD Deluxe mobo from 2008.
It was 4 cores and hyperthreading, 12GB of memory on win7x64. It was clocked at 3.8G for years.

I did the above upgrade, and noticed some strangeness; it only reported 16GB of memory in windows, but 24gb in the bios. ???
Much reading later, I found the Processor only supports 18GB of ram, so both were wrong. :)

So, I went looking for a processor.

I find that the chipset I have supports X5670 xeon processors, and that the multiplier is somewhat unlocked. $70 shipped.

https://starmicroinc.net/ << these guys sell refurb fairly inexpensively

I added a large air cooler that I had sitting around, and now it's running 4.5GHz at 60°C (fully loaded, benchmarking); that's 20 degrees cooler than the 920 at the same speed, and it has 6 cores and hyperthreading, so 12 cores. It also supports 24GB of memory, which is based on the processor, not the mobo.
If I had server memory, it would take 48GB... :)

It's more than 2x faster on benchmarks.

It's now ~30% slower than my main system at the same clocks in benchmarks; and that makes sense, as it has 3 memory channels instead of 4.

Caveats:

DDR3 memory, as used in most older mobos, was $25 for an 8GB stick last spring; now it's triple that.

An SSD boot drive is amazingly fast, but expensive.

Win7 supports a flash drive plugged into a port as a 'ReadyBoost" storage, similar to the page file, but faster.
Almost any drive you have will work, and will help some.

A 128GB USB 3.1 flash drive is ~$20, and this would be a nice boost; just get the fastest drive to match the ports you have.

Be warned: Some of my usb 3.1 drives draw too much power for a usb2 port... but they're 256GB. :zdunno:

I hope this helps someone!!
 

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250GB SSD's can be had for $80 or so. Well worth it for a boot only drive.
 

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My Steam directory is bigger than that, and it's the one directory I keep on a SSD for speed. :)
 

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My Steam directory is bigger than that, and it's the one directory I keep on a SSD for speed. :)
Install Steam and your "special" folder on a larger, standard or SSD drive.

My current laptop has three physical drive in it.
Drive 1 is a 256GB m.2 drive that has Windows and installed programs on it. I also have 30GB unassigned for drive longevity. I currently have 168GB Free out of 213 total.
Drive 2 is a 500GB 2.5" SSD, it has all of my user folders (Desktop, Documents, Pictures, Videos, Music, Etc) on it again with some drive space set aside unassigned for longevity. Currently sitting at 347GB free out of 432 total.
Drive 3 is a 1TB WD Black 2.5" drive in a optical drive caddy I got off of Amazon for $12. I use Macrium Reflect to image my boot and user volumes to it weekly as I've already had one m.2 drive fail two months into ownership. Should I lose the boot drive again, I can image it to the 500GB until I get a warranty replacement, and should the 500GB fail I can image it to the 1TB until I get a replacement. Laptop is a 7th gen Core I5 with 8GB Ram, and it goes from off to ready for login in 7 seconds. Login to ready (AV and other services loaded and ready) is only 5 to 10 seconds. I don't game on it (it's my work laptop, and that's what I have an Xbone for) but it's speedy, power efficient, and fault tolerant.
 

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3 Physical drives doesnt sound like it's doing your battery life any favors :)
-g


Install Steam and your "special" folder on a larger, standard or SSD drive.

My current laptop has three physical drive in it.
Drive 1 is a 256GB m.2 drive that has Windows and installed programs on it. I also have 30GB unassigned for drive longevity. I currently have 168GB Free out of 213 total.
Drive 2 is a 500GB 2.5" SSD, it has all of my user folders (Desktop, Documents, Pictures, Videos, Music, Etc) on it again with some drive space set aside unassigned for longevity. Currently sitting at 347GB free out of 432 total.
Drive 3 is a 1TB WD Black 2.5" drive in a optical drive caddy I got off of Amazon for $12. I use Macrium Reflect to image my boot and user volumes to it weekly as I've already had one m.2 drive fail two months into ownership. Should I lose the boot drive again, I can image it to the 500GB until I get a warranty replacement, and should the 500GB fail I can image it to the 1TB until I get a replacement. Laptop is a 7th gen Core I5 with 8GB Ram, and it goes from off to ready for login in 7 seconds. Login to ready (AV and other services loaded and ready) is only 5 to 10 seconds. I don't game on it (it's my work laptop, and that's what I have an Xbone for) but it's speedy, power efficient, and fault tolerant.
 

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My current main desktop has 5 drives; 2TB, 500GB SSD, 250GB, 250GB. all 6Gb sata drives.

Main drive, Steam drive, Music Videos, and MP3. (I have 250GB of mp3s, lol.)

It's a i7-3930k at 4.5GHz, 32GB ddr3, RX480 8GB.


The 2nd system has SAS 12k drives; it's much faster drive-wise, even faster than the SSD in thruput. It has the server Steam Account on it. (I keep 2) :)

It's an x5670 Xeon @4.5GHz, 24GB DDR3, HD7970 3GB.

The TV system is a i7-920, 12GB ddr3, HD6870, 2x 10GB RAID-5 arrays for storing TV. :)


(old computer guy voice:) Laptops are what I tune my cars with. (and capture Vinyl audio...)

:grin2:

I want to upgrade this year, but unless I spend $1000 on a processor, I won't beat my current speed by more than ~20%.

Socket 2066 seems big until you see the Threadripper packages...
 

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3 Physical drives doesnt sound like it's doing your battery life any favors :)
-g
I get 6+ hours typically. The third drive isn't in use, so it just spins idly, instead of "hunting" for data on a regular basis.
I could remove it or migrate it to an external, but I wanted to have the ability to swap files around without having to open up the cover. The way I see it, the single mechanical drive was already in the system to begin with, and since the "work" drives are SSD's, battery life is up from factory spec. Not as much as if I didn't have the old fashioned HDD in there, but better than it was, and the speed alone is worth it.

My current main desktop has 5 drives; 2TB, 500GB SSD, 250GB, 250GB. all 6Gb sata drives.

Main drive, Steam drive, Music Videos, and MP3. (I have 250GB of mp3s, lol.)

It's a i7-3930k at 4.5GHz, 32GB ddr3, RX480 8GB.


The 2nd system has SAS 12k drives; it's much faster drive-wise, even faster than the SSD in thruput. It has the server Steam Account on it. (I keep 2) :)

It's an x5670 Xeon @4.5GHz, 24GB DDR3, HD7970 3GB.

The TV system is a i7-920, 12GB ddr3, HD6870, 2x 10GB RAID-5 arrays for storing TV. :)


(old computer guy voice:) Laptops are what I tune my cars with. (and capture Vinyl audio...)

:grin2:

I want to upgrade this year, but unless I spend $1000 on a processor, I won't beat my current speed by more than ~20%.

Socket 2066 seems big until you see the Threadripper packages...
I'm a field tech, my laptop is my workhorse as I use it to diagnose networks, phone systems, troubleshoot, etc.
I have a decently stout workstation on my desk, Core I5, 256GB SSD m.2 for boot, 500GB SATA for data, attached to a linux based NAS server for storage (with 6 2TB WD Red hard drives in RAID6 with a hot spare). The laptop is also nice as it's portable and I can use it on the couch as I watch TV with my family if I need to look things up, vs. having to go down to my "office" next to my reloading bench to look things up like I did with my Ex wife just to get away from her for awhile. :D

I haven't had a decent workstation at home for 8 years now, just a long line of laptops. Although, if I did get a bug up my butt about PC gaming for some reason, I have an Nvida 940MX in the laptop with 2GB dedicated RAM so it'll do a decent job playing Half Life 2 or whatever, if I can even remember my steam login.
 
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