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More pics
 

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1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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Hey Mike, can you measure the diameter of the rod? I’m tempted to experiment with these myself in the summer using the die method.

I actually wonder how the cheap ones of these would perform, Nissan Zs are sports cars afterall. We’re so used to LX grade mush being the default shock valving for our cars that we gravitate towards the big renowned names like Bilstien, Koni, Tokico, etc. for sport valving, but the ones you modified might well feel like or better than Tokico Blues by comparison!
 

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The diameter of that shaft on this particular shock is 20mm, but I wouldn't count on that being the same from one manufacturer to another. If you didn't want to weld to the shock itself, rather than tapping the outside, it might make more sense to drill and tap the lower section and use a grade 8 bolt to hold the lower bracket to the shock body. If I were going to do that though, I would want to add a locating tab to the bracket and grind a notch in the shock body to prevent it from rotating back and forth slightly as the suspension cycles and eventually loosening up.

As for seeing how this one compares to the LX stuff, this shock was $15 on rockauto, so even if the valving is better, I wouldn't trust it to last more than 6 months! But maybe a set of Monroe's or some name brand stock replacements for the 350Z would be a cheap upgrade.
 

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The Tokico kit I bought a few years back had progressive springs that I don't really like; the sport shocks are much better for handling. The progressives have to be 'set' into a corner, kinda like you do on dirt.
The sports on the same shock are solid as a rock. :)
Mikey, this looks like this will fit damn near all the high end shocks that fit like that. "Koni race shocks come to mind. I'd love to have a set of the double adjustable konis. :>
 

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1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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The diameter of that shaft on this particular shock is 20mm, but I wouldn't count on that being the same from one manufacturer to another. If you didn't want to weld to the shock itself, rather than tapping the outside, it might make more sense to drill and tap the lower section and use a grade 8 bolt to hold the lower bracket to the shock body. If I were going to do that though, I would want to add a locating tab to the bracket and grind a notch in the shock body to prevent it from rotating back and forth slightly as the suspension cycles and eventually loosening up.

As for seeing how this one compares to the LX stuff, this shock was $15 on rockauto, so even if the valving is better, I wouldn't trust it to last more than 6 months! But maybe a set of Monroe's or some name brand stock replacements for the 350Z would be a cheap upgrade.
I thought about drilling it but wasn't sure how much would need to be cut for good thread engagement for the proper height, if I cut threads on that whole thing the bracket could be mounted flush against the shock body if necessary. Plus the drilling too far would be pretty unpleasant. wasnt sure how thick that section was either, 20mm seems like plenty of meat to get a decent sized bolt into though.

I agree, not those shocks specifically but a quality standard replacement shock could be a nice substitute for something like the Tokico or old Sport shock.
 

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I like the whole range of options available; in some very expensive places, there are remote reservoir shocks available. :)
I was surprised how hot the Konis were after one of my favorite roads. :)
 

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1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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I like the whole range of options available; in some very expensive places, there are remote reservoir shocks available. :)
I was surprised how hot the Konis were after one of my favorite roads. :)
Me too. Really there couldn't be a better source for us The 3000GT inserts were promising but those cars are as obscure as MN12s lol
 

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OK, I've been doing some research on spring rates now. The stock sport spring is a progressive spring going from 349-403lb/in. The stock 350z spring is 314lb/in. I found a set of springs made by RSR, which are linear 1/2" lowering springs, and have a spring rate of 345lb/in, so pretty close to the initial rate of the sport springs. I am thinking the Bilstein shocks, with the RSR springs would probably give a nice firm ride without being too jarring, and would probably be a good match for the sport/SC rear springs.

Here is the list of various 350z spring rates I found

Nismo Z (2007-2008) ride height is the same as other Z models linear front, progressive rear (initial and final rates shown)
492/336-672

Nismo S-tune shock and spring setup 350Z (twin tube, fixed height)
.6"/.6" drop (drop spec published in Nismo catalog)
Spring rates 393*-448/254*-504
*estimated initial spring rates (notice the front doesn’t have much spread)
Notice the spring rates the Nismo Z uses. Pretty much every avaliable lowering spring on the market does not have spring rates that can work correctly with the cars oem shocks.


Eibach 350Z progressive springs 1”/1”
Spring rates in LBS initial/final front 296/384 initial/final rear 316/421

Eibach 350Z sportline progressive springs 1.2"/1.2"
F: 239/400 R: 257/435

RSR 350Z linear springs .6”/.6”
Spring rates in LBS 345/417

Hotchkis 350Z Linear springs .6”/.8”
Spring rates in lbs 340/330

Tein S-tech 350Z springs .7“.6“ (fronts are slightly progressive, rears are linear)
Spring rates in LBS 386/402 (estimated front intial rate is 327lbs)

Tein H-tech 350z linear springs .3”/.2”
Spring rates in LBS 358/375

Progress Technology progressive springs 1.0”/1.0”
Spring rates in LBS 425/385 (final rates only, softer intial front progressive rate unknown)

Tokico D-spec shock & spring package
350Z - DSK512 - 375f/375r - Linear Springs 1"/1.5"

Tanabe GF210 Series 350Z progressive springs 1”/1.2”
Spring rates in LBS 336/375 (only peak rates are published, softer initial progressive rates unknown)

Tanabe NF210 Series 350Z progressive springs 1.2”/1.2” higher
Spring rates in LBS 314/353
Oem spring stiffness on a 1.2” drop, not a choice I would make

Skunk2 350Z progressive springs 1.3”/1”
Spring rate in LBS 238/381 237/395

Swift 350Z linear springs .8”/.6” drop on 350Z, G35 drop will be higher)
Spring rates in LBS 336/364

Swift 350Z Spec-R progressive springs 1.2”/1”
Spring rates in LBS intial/final Front: 291/392 Rear: 280/448

Nismo T2 350Z Linear springs 1”/1”
Spring rates in LBS 690/690
Do NOT run them with OEM shocks or Tokico D-specs. Use Koni sports or TcKline.

Vogtland 350z progressive springs 1”/1”
Spring rates in LBS initial/final front 257/354 initial/final rear 285/422


Kg/mm springs 350Z DR21 super sport 15mm drop
Spring rates in lbs initial/final front 246/398 initial/final rear 252/409

Kg/mm DRacing progressive springs 1.2”/1.2”
Spring rates in LBS initial/final front 252/454 initial/final rear 252/482 rear


Espelir 350Z progressive springs 10mm drop F&R
386/515 (softer initial progressive rates are unknown)
Most often purchased by owners chasing spring rate specs. But this spring is also often resold when they fail to deliver on the promise those specs were supposed to delivery. Not a bid surprise, they are progressive, not linear.

H&R sport progressive springs 350Z 1.3”/1” drop
Spring rates in LBS 370/400 (peak rates only, softer initial rates are unknown)
 

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I can’t actually find those for sale anywhere though. I can find the tein s-techs though. Maybe those would be a better option?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Glad to see the engagement here and further progress regarding this project. As a status update, still daily driving the car to see how well things hold up with time, so far so good. The bad, the Mustang is just sitting in the driveway with the rotors starting to rust. :ROFLMAO: Towards summer, I hope to try out lower drop springs and perhaps the Mark VIII top hats if things go as planned.

Notice the spring rates the Nismo Z uses. Pretty much every available lowering spring on the market does not have spring rates that can work correctly with the cars oem shocks.
Yup, I noticed that. Even the Bilstein B6's are technically an OE replacement so running extreme drop springs on those can potentially cut life from the shock. That is why I went with the Bilstein B8's as they were engineered with drop springs in mind. I am sure there are others options such as the higher end Tiens etc. that also are made for lowering springs but I haven't dived much into alternative options.
 

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Would the koni inserts work with something like this? This is for an Acura RL.
View attachment 43214
I'll be taking apart my Honda suspension to replace the front shocks soon. It's got the same fork as the above pictured RL fork. Though, I don't have any Koni inserts to test.

The problem with using inserts though is that there is no spring perch anywhere. It would have to somehow be affixed to the body of the insert. This part was discussed in either my suspension thread (see my signature) or in the Gunn's Bilstein insert thread.
I paid a visit to one of my nearby Pick-N-Pull type junkyards today for my Honda and I decided that I wanted to score these forks as well since I will be modifying them. I did the test fit on them, and they won't fit the LCA without some modification. The fork will need to be shaved down a bit, probably about 1/4" overall (I'm thinking 1/8 on each side) based on my "eyeball measurements".

Since making my post on this, I've come to realize that I was wrong about the forks all "being the same". They're not. These forks are specifically for the 6th Gen Honda Accord (1998 - 2002). While these forks all have the same basic design, the way they're shaped is not the same one generation (or brand) to the next despite how very similar each of these vehicles are to each other. Below is a list of forks from various Honda and Acura vehicles that might be slightly wider than these ones for my Honda:

Honda Accord (6GA, 1998-2002) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver 51821-S84-A00

Honda Accord (7GA, 2003 - 2007) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver: 51811-SDA-A00

Honda Accord (8GA, 2008-2012) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver: 51620-TA1-A05

Acura TL (2G) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver: 51821-S84-A00

Acura TL (3G) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver: 51821-SDA-A00

Acura TL (4G, 2009-2013) Front Strut Fork Right/Passenger: 51271-TA0-A01

Acura RL (3G, 2005-2009) Front Strut Fork Left/Driver: 51821-SJA-000


43785


43786


43787
 

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The inside diameter? Where the bolt goes through you mean?

Either way, I didn't take that measurement. I can do it tomorrow though.
 

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If you're dead set on making that fork fit the LCA, reduce the length of the sleeve in the LCA. Cutting down the fork will reduce the strength/durability of the fork. Reducing the length of the sleeve in the LCA will have zero effect on strength/durability.
 

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If you're dead set on making that fork fit the LCA, reduce the length of the sleeve in the LCA. Cutting down the fork will reduce the strength/durability of the fork. Reducing the length of the sleeve in the LCA will have zero effect on strength/durability.
We're not dead set on using the fork. We're trying to figure out something that will allow for something better. This fork is an explanation into that.
 

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1995 Ford Thunderbird LX w/ SC seats, Terminator Cobra rear springs and Koni Shocks
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I've been looking into purchasing the BC Racing extreme low kit for the 350z. The shock absorber assembly length is 2" shorter than other available 350z front coilover assemblies. That brings the shock assembly height closer to the stock Thunderbird, so no need for cutting and welding and taking the risks. I guess it would just be applying the already aforementioned steps needed like enlarging the lower clevis mount holes and modifying the upper mount to take the BC coil spring. You can also purchase the necessary individual parts from the BC racing website if you're in the US. They also offer the ER series kit that seems to have better dampening but its like 200$ more per coilover. I know BC is on the upper end of midrange, lower end of high range brands, but for regular everyday use it should suffice.
 

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The Parts Guy
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We're not dead set on using the fork. We're trying to figure out something that will allow for something better. This fork is an explanation into that.
Right, it's just that there are almost certainly better options, dimensionally speaking. A shorter fork will allow for a taller shock body.
 
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