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Add shifter interlock cable woes to the list.

The rather fragile 4mm or so battery bolts like to seize and or rust in the tray and then snap.

Rust belt cars may tend to break springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
One thing to be on the look out for is fuel pumps, but that goes for any older car.

Use this repair to knock down the price if needed. "well it is a 300 dollar job just in labor"
 

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One thing to be on the look out for is fuel pumps, but that goes for any older car.

Use this repair to knock down the price if needed. "well it is a 300 dollar job just in labor"
You should update the first post with the relevant new info. The pumps a good point and not MN12 specific. But it would be good to know about what mileage they go bad on average.

If it's not listed I would mention heater core issues and the fact that bad grounds compound the problem.

I'd leave out the window trim bit. It's cosmetic and common on any 18+ year old car. Out of all the things I'd be looking at on a used car the fact that the window trims faded isn't even on the radar.
 

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Mileage might not be the best metric for fuel pumps. Letting the tank run low (less than 1/4) consistently probably isn't as good for them as keeping the tank full all the time.

The one on the FIL's 01 GT went bad at like 60k. His T-bird's went bad around 140k. My Mark VIII's died at 195k. I replaced the stocker in my bird before it could die, and the old 94 Cougar I had was still running strong when I sold it north of 150k...
 

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Having owned 4 different sunroof MN12 cars with moon roofs I will say that the statement made above is a complete joke. All of my cars come from one of the most intense heat climates you'll find and I've never had an issue with rocker rot or dry rot.
400,000 body miles in the texas heat and my T-bird has never had any kind of issue with the moonroof, rocker rotor dry rot.
 

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Mileage might not be the best metric for fuel pumps. Letting the tank run low (less than 1/4) consistently probably isn't as good for them as keeping the tank full all the time.

The one on the FIL's 01 GT went bad at like 60k. His T-bird's went bad around 140k. My Mark VIII's died at 195k. I replaced the stocker in my bird before it could die, and the old 94 Cougar I had was still running strong when I sold it north of 150k...
My poor old parts car. 178k on the clock. In the last year I rarely put more than 1/2 in it. I always figured it might be the last trip lol. It was below a 1/4 quite a bit. But yeah it's important to keep the pump submerged as the gas acts a source to transfer heat away from the pump.

Some stuff like late 1980s and early nineties FI Escorts seemed to all lose the in tank pumps right at 89-100K regular as clock work. I just thought there might be a similar interval for the MN12. I should say I bought my current parts car with 80k so it's possible it may have been replaced before I bought it. The 100k I put on it was more remarkable for what it didn't need.

Personally I think that if the pumps gotten somewhere north of 200K it's about due. They dont last forever. If I had to replace a pump at 200K I'd strug it off as a normal maintenance expense. It does make me wonder what the upper end of the scale is before they die. 250k? 300K? Some of the southern guys may know. Not much up here I've seen with over 200k.

I do think that totally crappy gas may shorten the life. As will letting the car sit. A buddy did his wife's Mustang GTat 3500 miles. But the car is just not driven all that much. Maybe a tank a year.

If there's some consensus on a average it would be good to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I think keeping this post as is would be a good idea.

Also can someone make a poll with various intervals, i am not used to this version of the forum software, i'm used to other software/versions.

Options will be

Fuel Pump failure: Miles

Under 100K

100-125K

125-150k

150-175k

175k-200k

200-225k

225-250k

250+
 

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-The trim to watch out for that is fairly Cougar exclusive is the quarter window trim getting baked. Tbirds seem to hold up better here and the whole glass needs to be replaced to fix it
I had this on my 92, and I have it pretty bad on the driver side, but not so much the passenger. Is there anything to do to slow it down? Besides looking hideous, how bad does it have to get before it actually causes a problem?
 

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My '96 4.6L had the coolant crossover failure about 14 years and 140,000 miles ago. The manifold I have now, replaced under the recall/extended warranty at zero cost to me, must have been an early one since it's all black plastic externally. [knocks on various wood and faux-wood objects till knuckles are raw]

I started noticing the rocker rot last year... sad, but inevitable, on a car that was a daily driver including winters first in SD and later ND, with excursions into MN and other neighboring states, for the timeframe of 1998 through 2010.

196k+ miles and I've never touched the fuel pump. I want to get the car past 200k... after that, I'm not sure what I'm doing with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
General Thing for new owners

Stock up on random parts, what is easily found today may not be when you need it.
 

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I do think that totally crappy gas may shorten the life. As will letting the car sit. A buddy did his wife's Mustang GTat 3500 miles. But the car is just not driven all that much. Maybe a tank a year.

If there's some consensus on a average it would be good to know.[/QUOTE]

I have a 40th Anniversary Packaged '04 GT Mustang Convertible that I had to replace the fuel pump this past spring with only 23K miles. Car is sometimes driven less than 250 miles during warm weather months for car shows. A co-worker had to change his '04 Mach 1 fuel pump out at 9300 miles. Seems the factory ford fuel pumps don't do well in the tank of rarely driven 'Stangs.

I hope I don't have this issue with the Cougar I just purchased. It has 41k miles and was last registered in '08. Sat in the lady's basement due to health reasons. Still working out some of the lack of usage bugs with one being inoperative wipers, washers pump and door/key chimes. Fixed all the other electrical issues encountered so far but that one. Have checked the combination switch, the relay module, and fuses. Anyone have any input on the ground wire(s) location for this circuit?

Would like to suggest this be considered an issue on low usage cars if not listed already further on in the thread. I've run across several searches listing this issue for T-Birds and Cougars.
 

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Dump a can of Sea Foam in a full tank of gas, to dissolve varnish from all of the fuel system components.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #35
According to the guy i got my leather interior off of, the t-bird power seat motors are a flawed design from the start. He worked at Holman Ford until 2001 as a service/parts guy. And he was able to swap my interior for me in about 45 minutes, so i can trust that he would be right about that!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
This is not a common problem, or a problem at all. This is more like a "good design" feature.


the MN12 does not use struts up front, they do sell quick struts (i have a set) but they are really coilovers. Meaning that you don't have to do much to get them in or out. Break the ball joint loose to get more room to swing the bottom arm out, unbolt the top bolts, unbolt the bottom bolt, it is as easy as doing a regular shock absorber.

Common Issue: New shocks will rarely have the right mounts for the rear, just go with whatever they have for the top mount and follow the directions, it is differnet but....it works 100%.
Don't try and get the sport suspension....nobody really makes it anymore.
 

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According to the guy i got my leather interior off of, the t-bird power seat motors are a flawed design from the start. He worked at Holman Ford until 2001 as a service/parts guy. And he was able to swap my interior for me in about 45 minutes, so i can trust that he would be right about that!
The motors are fine I believe... taken them apart more than once... very simple...rotor, stator..the magnets are actually in the metal tubes that hold the parts... Pretty simple.
The BAD part of the design is the power seat switches. There's a lot of copper parts which I think just wear at the contacts over the years...

I've a post on the seats here somewhere..

Perfect? No but pretty simple to fix :)
 
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