TCCoA Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
The battalion commander who risked his life in the field for his men.

In Vietnam in March 1970, Schwarzkopf was involved in rescuing men of his battalion from a minefield.[4] He had received word that men under his command had encountered a minefield on the notorious Batangan Peninsula, and rushed to the scene in his helicopter, as was his custom while a battalion commander, in order to make his helicopter available. He found several soldiers still trapped in the minefield. Schwarzkopf urged them to retrace their steps slowly. Still, one man tripped a mine and was severely wounded but remained conscious. As the wounded man flailed in agony, the soldiers around him feared that he would set off another mine. Schwarzkopf, also wounded by the explosion, crawled across the minefield to the wounded man and held him down (using a "pinning" technique from his wrestling days at West Point) so another could splint his shattered leg. One soldier stepped away to break a branch from a nearby tree to make the splint. In doing so, he too hit a mine, which killed him and the two men closest to him, and blew an arm and a leg off Schwarzkopf's artillery liaison officer. Eventually, Schwarzkopf led his surviving men to safety, by ordering the division engineers to mark the locations of the mines with shaving cream. (Some of the mines were of French manufacture and dated back to the Indochina conflict of the 1950s; others were brought by Japanese forces in World War II).
He was one of the Vietnam-era soldiers who stayed in and rebuilt the post-Vietnam U. S. Army. They got rid of the felons and drug addicts.

James Kitfield documented this in his book, "Prodigal Soldiers", that was published following the Persian Gulf War. It's a good read if you're into that kinda stuff like I am.

I was still stuck in a training squadron when the first war went down. He always seemed to me to be the winning head coach of the entire DoD team.

An officer who truly cared for his men and made the necessary sacrifices to give them the victory. His example of leadership reverberated across and down all of the military service branches back then.

Define victory and achieve it. Nothing wrong with that.:ssalute:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,862 Posts
Sad loss of a great man...
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top