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i haven't read the link yet but wasn't that used on an early 80's Cadillac with poor results??

**edit** yeap .. i was right.. lol

General Motors was the first to modify existing, production engines to enable cylinder deactivation, with the introduction of the Cadillac L62 "V8-6-4" in 1981.
 

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i don't know but the ls2 vette engine had it with good result

the V8-6-4 in the caddies was ****ty back in the '80s. DCX uses it in thier Hemis since the fuel rating on them is horrendous. GM uses them on the trucks, V8 cars, and yes the Vette. But......could it be used on our cars? um, no. you dont have a Vette, and dont bother.
 

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I think you need a specific engine that accounts for DOD. It's not as simple as just turning off the fuel to specific cylinders.

This article has some good information.

"Currently, we could disable just the fuel delivery," says Meagher, "but the valves would still be opening and closing and each cylinder would still be doing work pumping air in and out. So there would be no net gain in efficiency--you wouldn't have eliminated the pumping losses at all."
 

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My folks had an early '80s Olds 98 with the the v8-6-4 engine. My mom hit an
ice patch, it decided to shift, she almost went over a cliff. That was the last winter
she ever drove that car!
 

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The 4-6-8 Caddy was crap. The new Chrysler Hemi has DOD, but gets crappy gas mileage. The new small block chevy seems to be pretty good, but no stellar mileage. I am sure it helps, but no miracle cure.
 

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I've talked to someone with a Monte SS with the DOD and he said his city mpg was just over 17 mpg.Hell my Thunderbird gets that at least.I don't trust the numbers on the DOD or any window sticker for that matter.Mileage subject to change with driving habits.
 

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I've always wondered how that kind of thing would work.

Sure, you could have the PCM cut the fuel to certain cylinders, or randomize that delivery, but stuff is still moving. The parasitic losses would completely offset any fuel mileage gains.

Having clutches engage sections of the crankshaft would be ummm....complicated. And certainly not dependable at any RPM.

I guess I'll have to look it up, find out what exactly they are doing to accomplish this, and see if any of this makes any sense to my own darn self.......
 

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Could it be used in our cars? Sure! Just drop in an LS2! It will be a lot cheaper and easier than trying to engineer it to work on a 4.6. Or you could just save all the money you would spend on that swap to pay for the extra gas you will use by getting 2mpg less on the highway.
 

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My dads caddy with a northstar 350 has it and one day i got 28.9 driving in the city.


You can do anything to any car if you toss enough cash and time into it.

A V (v8 v6) block is a block wires and ecu is what it all comes down to.
 
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