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I did a couple of searches and didn't see much, a couple of threads over a year old I believe. I had a local gas station start offereing E85, and am curious about this mixture. Being 105 octane and about $.70 less a gallon to super unleaded, was wondering if this is something to look at.

5.0 magazine had an interesting article:
http://www.mustang50magazine.com/techarticles/m5lp_0709_e85_terminator/index.html
 

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Your mileage (if it is a concern for you) will drop 10-15%

Even with the 10% blend I notice a drop in mileage compared to non blended fuel.
 

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I have that very magazine here at home... I've read the article several times. Seems an easy conversion to do, and if you can even find a switch chip anymore, you don't have to go with E85 all the time, you can switch between premium and E85.
 

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Your mileage (if it is a concern for you) will drop 10-15%

Even with the 10% blend I notice a drop in mileage compared to non blended fuel.
:zwthstpd: My Aspire drops from 38 mpg to 35.5 mpg simply with the 10% blend. :redmad:

Here's a good thing to look at when considering E85:

http://www.fuelgaugereport.com/

Look at the column labeled "E85 MPG/BTU adjusted price"

That is what it will really cost to drive using E85 vs. regular due to the decreased mpg.

Now if you build an engine that will have a high CR to go along with the 105 octane of the E85, then IMHO it is worth it. However, then you are limited to only running E85 or having to detune it so far to run on premium gas, that it sort of defeats the purpose.

AND you have spent $$$$ on a new engine using money that could have been simply spent gas.

Since I drive 110 miles a day, I've looked into many, many, many different ways to improve mileage. While each have their pro's and con's, when you do a cost benefit analysis I just can't justify any modifications. Especially when you start looking at how long it will take to recoup the initial investments for the modifications.

Bottom line is the number one way to increase fuel economy, is to change your driving style (research “hypermiling techniques” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypermiling ). And changing your driving style doesn’t cost a dime (but maybe a little more time to get places).

I personally don’t endorse “true” hypermiling, because (IMHO) it is actually quite dangerous, but they are proven techniques that can help.

But just my .02. :thumbsup:
 

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50 years of Mercury Cougar 1967/2017
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I've done it. E85 all the time. There are many stations in the so. fla area.
Built a new engine with 12 to 1 compression ratio. Would have gone higher, had to get custom pistons.
MPG suffers, My cougar gets 14 mpg on the highway, going 60 with cruise control. I just fixed the odometer gear and found out my mileage was a little higher than I had estimated in the past.
The only thing I had to change was to a 225l. fuel pump, 60lpm injectors and the tune. I run e85 all the time.
I run it in my Mountaineer. flex fuel. 12mpg around town. Rated at 15.
If you want the power of ethanol with high compression, do it.
 

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Does anyone know what kind of set up the factory FlexFuel cars have that allows them to automatically detect how much alcohol is in the fuel and compensate accordingly? That'd be a better set up than the switch chip if its at all possible.
 

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Does anyone know what kind of set up the factory FlexFuel cars have that allows them to automatically detect how much alcohol is in the fuel and compensate accordingly? That'd be a better set up than the switch chip if its at all possible.
That's a good question. I did a quick google:

http://www.aa1car.com/library/e85.htm said:
The fuel system must also be equipped with a special fuel sensor that uses a dielectric measuring principle to determine the percentage of ethanol to gasoline (ethanol is more conductive than gasoline).
 

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Since I drive 110 miles a day, I've looked into many, many, many different ways to improve mileage. While each have their pro's and con's, when you do a cost benefit analysis I just can't justify any modifications. Especially when you start looking at how long it will take to recoup the initial investments for the modifications.
My spouse drives 84 miles each day (mostly highway)...so in October we bought an '09 Jetta TDI and see 46-50mpg on a regular basis (goes over 600 miles before the low fuel light comes on). Best modification we ever did! :D Hell, even my diesel Excursion averages 20mpg combined (22-24 highway). At 305hp with 600ft/lbs of twist it ain't no slouch either...

But back to E85...when I looked into it, the amount of fuel system, engine, and engine management changes far outweighed any performance gains or savings at the pump over standard gas or race fuel, with the disclaimer that my car is not a daily driver. I'd rather try and stuff a Duramax diesel engine into the car before I'd mess with E85. 800hp-1000ft/lbs torque @ 30+ mpg is certainly achievable with #2 diesel. Just my $.02...

This is an interesting read:
9 second Mustang that gets 35 mpg
 

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i have tried it in my 53 , as the flatty is one of the original " flex " fuel engines . they were designed to run on corn alchohol or petroleum . anyway it suffered , and it don't get diddly to begin with { 8mpg in town , worse on the open road due to the gearing } and it probably halved it . also was way down on power to the point my grandkids could outrun me on a trike . i haven't run any through the bird yet and won't . we ran e-85 years ago in our sportsman dirt car , as the local refiner cut us a huge break if we ran it , and we had to take it apart and put higher compression / larger domed pistons in it , which led to valve interference and machining , increased the jet size to ginormous , more timing advance both mechanical and centrifugal , go through the entire fuel system and convert it , a bigger pump , on and on . in my opinion it's not worth the hassle at this point . maybe later when it becomes more cost effective .......................
 

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From what Ive read all you need to convert is a bigger fuel pump, bigger injectors, and a tune. A lot of people upgrade those parts anyway and get a tune. So really the extra performance is a bonus in my mind. You may have to use more fuel to get places but at 50 to 75 cents cheaper a gallon (maybe more not sure) that doesnt seem like a bad deal. Plus its made with American grown crops so it helps alleviate dependence on foreign oil while boosting American economy. To me it just makes sense.
 

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Whoa that diesel swap into a stang is pretty cool. I wonder what all that took.
-Rob
 

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My SC loves blended oxygenated fuel, but a NA standard compression engine is not the best place for it. IMO either need high CR or a Heat Generator (blower).

This is a much better conversion for SC's.
 

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I don't know if Lonnie has ever tuned for E85, but you can always ask him if/how it can be done. He might even know the other parts to your question. He knows his stuff and has been pretty busy lately... shoot him an e-mail, see what he says. :) [email protected]
 
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