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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This story covers both engine and drivetrain, but I'm just sticking the whole thing here.

I decided to take the plunge on a 5-speed. Then, I got a good deal on a brand new, never been installed, 2004 Mustang GT engine. Then I thought how nice a remotely mounted oil filter would be. Then, while it's out,... As most projects do, mine continually increased in scope and cost.

I assembled the engine and transmission and installed them as a unit. Centerforce Dual Friction clutch, FRPP flywheel.



The engine swap is pretty straight forward, and has been covered many times. I had to devise a new routing for the serpentine belt, as there was interference with the AC lines coming off the compressor and one of the Mustang idler pulleys. It’s still not good, as there is not enough belt wrap on the AC compressor. Hence, it squeals instead of cools. That’s a real problem with a black car in Houston; I’m not sure what I’m going to do. Swapping front covers is a last resort. If anyone has a suggestion, I'm all ears.


For the clutch system, I went with a little different configuration than what others have done. I used the Super Coupe master cylinder and a Wilwood pull-type slave cylinder. With the Centerforce clutch, pedal effort is heavier than a factory setup, but not bad at all. To connect to the master cylinder, I drilled and tapped the plastic. Yes, it sounds silly, but guys swapping LS1 engines into all kinds of cars have been doing it with the Chevy master cylinder, which is almost identical. You have to trim the outer end off, and get into the thick plastic. Then tap it with some pipe threads, and you’re good to go. For the clutch line, I picked up a kit made by Longacre. It has a long braided stainless line and a bunch of fittings.

Here’s the first setup on the transmission. I should have seen it coming, but once we installed it, there wasn’t enough room for the clutch arm to move. The body of the slave cylinder interfered. The second picture shows the modified installation. As an added bonus, the modified installation moves the slave cylinder further from the exhaust.




You’ll see in the second picture that the pull-rod was extended using a coupling nut and a length of all-thread. Easier said than done, as the pull rod uses some odd-ball threads, and the local hardware stores don’t stock anything like it. I had to order the stuff from McMaster Carr.

Here’s some pics of the shifter extension, as detailed in Papa John’s tech article:




I learned an important lesson when installing the shifter. Just because it feels like it goes into gear, doesn't mean it is all the way in gear. When we got the clutch working, I started it up (car on jackstands), put it in first, let the clutch out, and it worked. Shift to second, let clutch out, and much grinding ensued while it popped out of gear. Fourth and reverse didn't work either, and that's too much of a coincidence.

We pulled the shifter off, and manually put it in second gear. This worked, ruling out the transmission. It had to be the shifter, a Steeda Tri-Ax I picked up used. After much study, cursing, and careful deliberation, we determined that the shifter wasn't centered over the shift link in the fore/aft direction. Basically, with the transmission in neutral, the shift lever was leaning back towards 4th just a touch. But it was enough that the shifter itself didn't have enough movement in that direction to engage 2/4/R. The solution was easy, move the shifter forward.

The execution of the solution wasn't so easy. We had already moved the shifter box forward until it butted against the transmission. We couldn't move the shifter link back any, because the secondary shift rod had no more room. I finally decided to drill new holes at the front of the shift plate, and notch the rear. The notches are due to the fact that there's not enough material to drill new holes in to. Hopefully, the notches will provide a little side-to-side support. I also had to trim the front of the shifter plate to allow it to move forward. Here's a crude drawing, and a pic of the install:





So now that we have all the mechanicals working, what about electronics?

I tapped into the transmission harness for the backup lights and neutral safety switch wiring (that is the yellow wires coming through the shifter hole in some of the pictures). For the computer, I purchased an SCT X-Cal2 from www.blueovalchips.com . The reprogramming went fine.

I mounted a switch to the clutch box to act as a neutral safety switch. That way, the clutch has to be in to crank, and also my cruise control still works. Here’s a pic of my fancy clutch safety switch:


Lastly, to add a little bling, I replaced the ash tray with some gauges (left to right: Oil Pressure, Water Temp, Oil Temp). I bought the gauge face at www.egauges.com for $16. I also did white face gauges in the dash, so it all matches:




And here’s what the inside looks like all finished:

 

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jesusraybrown said:
:bowdown: I am so very very jealous of you.
:zwthstpd:

One day there will be a 5 speed in my car. That's what I keep telling myself anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just a follow-up. I finally found a belt route that is compatible with the AC compressor. The first routing I tried didn't have enough belt wrap to drive the compressor. This one does. In case anyone else does it the same way, the belt is 91.5" long. Also, you'll have to bend a little bracket holding the wiring harness between the crank and PS pulleys. Here's my fancy MS Paint rendition of the new routing:


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
firescout211 said:
i have an 04 gt engine in my 96 bird. i just swapped front covers. its not like it takes away from horsepower or anything.
That's always an option, and if I had anticipated the interference from the AC lines, I might have done that while both engines were on stands. But once it was installed and running, swapping covers was a LAST resort. This new system seems to work fine, so anyone using the search button will discover a less work-intensive option than swapping covers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
FunktasticLucky said:
wait a sec... doesn't that spin the water pump the other direction... Which I'm pretty sure is something you don't wanna do??
Look again.

More generally, as long as the smooth side of the belt contacts the smooth pulleys, and the ribbed side of the belt contacts the ribbed pulleys, everything will be spinning the correct direction.
 

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tobey ive been waiting for you to post pics!man it look great.thanks again for the parts.you saved me alotta stress.
 
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