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Discussion Starter #1
who has had it done or has reviews? opinions? :D
 

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My father paid our local mustang performance shop 4-5 years ago to extrude Hone/port and polish his STOCK '95 4.6 bird upper/lower intake when he had his engine rebuilt.... I told him it was a waste of money and he should have done the P.I swap so why spend that kinda cash?. My dad's answer was "Who do you know that has done it? Why not be different?". I will honestly say I could tell that it helped...how much power did he make with it? I have no idea because a drunk driver wrecked into his bird before we could dyno it :mad: I still have the upper/lower intake and have no use for it.
Chris C.
 

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My father paid our local mustang performance shop 4-5 years ago to extrude Hone/port and polish his STOCK '95 4.6 bird upper/lower intake when he had his engine rebuilt.... I told him it was a waste of money and he should have done the P.I swap so why spend that kinda cash?. My dad's answer was "Who do you know that has done it? Why not be different?". I will honestly say I could tell that it helped...how much power did he make with it? I have no idea because a drunk driver wrecked into his bird before we could dyno it :mad: I still have the upper/lower intake and have no use for it.
Chris C.
If you felt gains, I would bet you 99% sure it wasn't from the honing, but from the polishing. Everybody used to not polish inside intakes because it helped to mix the air/fuel mixture better. These days, the only thing going through that intake is air, the fuel is injected at the valve, so polish that baby up!

I know I polished the upper plenum on my 95 and not only did a vacuum gauge show the difference, the butt dyno could DEFINITELY feel the difference...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so,its not porting the piece being worked on,just polishing it?
 

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Porting is an old school term where cast iron parts were predominant with rough surfaces and casting flash. While you still certainly have those same imperfections in today's modern materials, it is much more refined in the fit and finish. But porting implies removing significantly enough material to dimensionally change the end product so as to flow more volume easier - sometimes only in specific areas such as blending a radius. Polishing is simply what the name implies, smoothing of the finished surface to minimize friction of the intended flow, usually the entire surface area exposed to the flow.

Extrude hone as we know it is an abrasive media treatment which still removes such imperfections but can also be controlled quite precisely as to the amount of material removed and the quality of the surface finish. To "port" (reshape or make bigger) using the extrude hone process would be extreme, most of the applications using extrude hone processes are more of a surface treatment akin to old fashioned polishing. Further, extrude hone is generally a universal application where the entire surface area is treated and not just specific areas.
 

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Porting is an old school term where cast iron parts were predominant with rough surfaces and casting flash. While you still certainly have those same imperfections in today's modern materials, it is much more refined in the fit and finish. But porting implies removing significantly enough material to dimensionally change the end product so as to flow more volume easier - sometimes only in specific areas such as blending a radius. Polishing is simply what the name implies, smoothing of the finished surface to minimize friction of the intended flow, usually the entire surface area exposed to the flow.

Extrude hone as we know it is an abrasive media treatment which still removes such imperfections but can also be controlled quite precisely as to the amount of material removed and the quality of the surface finish. To "port" (reshape or make bigger) using the extrude hone process would be extreme, most of the applications using extrude hone processes are more of a surface treatment akin to old fashioned polishing. Further, extrude hone is generally a universal application where the entire surface area is treated and not just specific areas.
Did you "copy & paste" that or is that your own words! Very impressive!!!! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Porting is an old school term where cast iron parts were predominant with rough surfaces and casting flash. While you still certainly have those same imperfections in today's modern materials, it is much more refined in the fit and finish. But porting implies removing significantly enough material to dimensionally change the end product so as to flow more volume easier - sometimes only in specific areas such as blending a radius. Polishing is simply what the name implies, smoothing of the finished surface to minimize friction of the intended flow, usually the entire surface area exposed to the flow.

Extrude hone as we know it is an abrasive media treatment which still removes such imperfections but can also be controlled quite precisely as to the amount of material removed and the quality of the surface finish. To "port" (reshape or make bigger) using the extrude hone process would be extreme, most of the applications using extrude hone processes are more of a surface treatment akin to old fashioned polishing. Further, extrude hone is generally a universal application where the entire surface area is treated and not just specific areas.
:eek: damn-thanks lol:D
 

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Isn't extrude hone basically a flowbench with a grit slurry instead of air?
 

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I did say basically; the diff between what I said and a million dollar business is a few details... :)
 

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I remember the story going around the net a few years back about the ricer who poured a bag of sand into his intake while it was running for a cheap alternative to extrude honing. No idea if that was real or b.s. but I thought it was funny.
 
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