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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I removed the fuel pump from the gas tank I found a round disk in the bottom of the tank. The disk is about 3 3/4" in diameter and about 1/4" thick. It has a bump in the middle that sticks up about 1" on one side and about 1" in diameter. On opposite ends of the disk and about 170 degrees apart from each other are two more smaller bumps. Since I can't post a picture, this is as close as I can show it! -__[]__- If you look at the small bumps straight on from the side there is a square notch under each bump. This thing isn't shown in the Ford Thunderbird shop manual so I don't know if it needs to be somewhere in the tank or was it dropped into the tank during assembly. Anyone have any idea what it is? Thanks. I should also mention it is made from black plastic.
 

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The Parts Guy
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Can you host the picture (at photobucket for instance) and post the link? I don't recognize it from that description, but a picture may clear things up.
 

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I've had two tanks off, and haven't found anything... :confused: Except crud, lol.

Like RaceCougar said, post pix! I'm curious.
 

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From your description..My guess would be it's a "slug" or "knockout"..

Basically when the plastic fuel tank was being manufactured..The spot where the fuel sender flange would mount..That opening in the tank..

I'm just guessing someone was sleeping, and forgot to grab the plastic "knockout" out of the tank before it made it to the assembly line..


Maybe.. :tongue:



Rayo..
 

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The edges are the wrong profile to be a knockout; those "channels" are a no-no if you want to punch that out.

That looks like the bottom cover for some kind of cheap sump pump; the two channels are to minimize blockage.

I'd bet someone used a cheap pump to empty it at some point, and dissolved the parts that held it together with gasoline... I could easily be wrong, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm the original owner and the tank has never been out before so someone at the factory had to drop it into the tank. The reason I took the tank out was because the gauge read full and I ran out of gas. The car has been stored for many years but I start it and let it run until it reaches operating temp every month or so. It has less the 8K miles on it!
 

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I'm almost 100% sure it's a "slug" or "knockout" now..

Here's some pics I found in the 1989-1997 Thunderbird Fuel Pump Installation Article

Notice where the ridges are in the opening of the fuel tank where the sender flange sits..The "knockout" has those same ridges..




I'll have to look, and see if that "knockout" is in my tank when I change the fuel pump..

Reminds me of finding the Dreidel in the transmission pan..lol

No doubt with those low miles..That's probably floating around in there too.. :tongue:



Rayo..
 

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You're right; that's definitely the matching piece.

I wonder how they punch those?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the picture Rayo! That's it for sure. It was so cold and I just wanted to get everything back together that I didn't think to look at the tank for a clue as to what the slug was.

From the picture of the tank it looks like they use a hole saw to cut the slug out and use the hole in the center of the slug to center the saw blade.

Yes, the tranny plug (dreidel) is still in it! I wondered where one of those came from the first time I changed the fluid and filter in a tranny many years ago! :confused:

This car was bought for my wife but a few months after we got it Ford announced they were stopping production of the Thunderbird so we bought her a '95 TBird to use as a daily driver (still have that one too)!

Thanks to everyone for your replies!
 
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