TCCoA Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
PostWhore, The AFDB is on a lil tight.
Joined
·
3,868 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I swapped in a new rotor hub assembly on my roommates 92 mustang gt. I am kinda wondering about the level of tightness you turn the hub adjustment nut. I did it little more than hand tight and til I noticed the new assembly wouldnt spin as easily. I locked it in position as tight as I could get it without creating binding feeling. Does this sound correct?

Also if the guide pins show rust do that need to be replaced? Is that safe? I just dumped in a bunch of lube around them after cleaning them up. THe bolts dont look like they are going to break its not that bad. Btw this is a Michigan car. I had to grind off the strut retaining nut to free up the hardware if thats any indicator.

ALso last stupid lazy question what is the tq spec on the 4 lug fox pony rims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
645 Posts
On the rotor, tighten it down snug then back it off, and tighten it until the rotor just starts to drag a little when you turn it.

When you say guide pins are you talking about the bolts that hold the caliper on? If they just had surface rust and no cracks they should be fine. The grease is a good idea to help the calipers slide.

I'd torque the wheels 90-100 ft-lbs.
 

·
PostWhore, The AFDB is on a lil tight.
Joined
·
3,868 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
On the rotor, tighten it down snug then back it off, and tighten it until the rotor just starts to drag a little when you turn it.

When you say guide pins are you talking about the bolts that hold the caliper on? If they just had surface rust and no cracks they should be fine. The grease is a good idea to help the calipers slide.

I'd torque the wheels 90-100 ft-lbs.
Thanks I guess I had the right idea. I tightened it without the wheel on, it was just the rotor I was turning to feel for dragging. I more or less followed what you said I was feeling for the point of bind that I didnt want to cross. I used the bearing grease to grease up the bolts and yes they are the ones the hold the caliper on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
For brake components, you can also use brake caliper grease. It is thicker and is designed to endure the spray and heat seen by the caliper/spindle interfaces. One container will last you for years, but you will have the right lube for the job.
 

·
PostWhore, The AFDB is on a lil tight.
Joined
·
3,868 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I was merely using the things given to me to work with. Thanks for the suggestion. Ill try and pick some up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
For brake components, you can also use brake caliper grease. It is thicker and is designed to endure the spray and heat seen by the caliper/spindle interfaces. One container will last you for years, but you will have the right lube for the job.
Good point. I just did slide bolts on my MN12 and had to choose between white lithium {container about 40 y.o.} and bearing grease. I picked bearing grease this time {had used lithium before on foxes, Taurus and prev mn12}.
Just a thin film is enough.
Note: do not sand dry cake off pins, use brake cleaner, unless you use fine paper and ensure it's smooth to the fingernail.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top