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Yes, I was saying $170 because I will want to get bushings as well. I'm thinking it's $170 for both sides, but I'd like to be 100% sure so I know how much needs to be spent. :)
 

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1997 Thunderbird LX
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Actually I think it's $180! $135 for the sleeves and then another $45 for the bushings.

Joe
 

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Hey ya'll. I need some help. My brothers are busy and my husband is not a car dude. I know more than he does. Anyway I need to buy the front lower control arms for both sides as well as the bushing for the control arm to strut. The ball joint on the passenger side looks blown out and the bushing from the strut arm is blown out too. It makes a noise like when someone is jumping on a bed or doing something else...... anyway it's quite embarrassing driving around town. Sometimes it does it and sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes it feels like I'm driving on ice and sometimes it acts just fine. I cannot do high speeds anymore cause it pulls the right something awful, especially when the brakes are applied. I almost was flung into a semi then the middle divider on the freeway. Thank God I am quick with the steering. Anywho sorry for the story but advice would help. Thank you.
 

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I think most people install the thermoplastic bushings with the "bullet pointing forward" at the subframe just like I did the first time as shown below.

There were no instructions with the Moog kit I got, so I put the bullet forward because that's the way the OEM setup looks.



Since I was getting the familiar steering wheel oscillation, I called Moog tech support and the guy I talked to was able to dig up a technical drawing for the kit itself.

As you can see from the drawing, the more conical bushing is actually the rear rod-to-sub-frame bushing.



So I pulled everything apart and reinstalled the bushings with "the bullet pointed to the rear" as shown in the picture below. I had to use the split replacement sleeves because I mangled the OEM ones getting the bushings out.



This was in April of 2013 and the feedback was noticeably reduced, but still there. So I just threw my hands up and said, "Oh, well."

Later that October I was checking the brakes and noticed the master cylinder fluid level was a little low. I filled up the master cylinder to the correct level and the oscillation disappeared. I posted this on my project thread, but decided to wait a while and see what happened before posting on this thread.

After putting several thousand miles on the car since driving it to work, here are my thoughts on the thermoplastic bushings:

  • They work fine if installed correctly per the Moog technical drawing
  • Resonance will occur when the pads and rotors wear down and brake line fluid pressure decreases to a certain point
  • "Pumping up" the master cylinder when the brakes are worn will add pressure and temporarily eliminate oscillation

The car drove normally with no bushing resonance/steering wheel oscillation in months of normal usage as a daily driver.

I will be replacing the pads on the car soon and the oscillation that has slowly crept back as the brakes have worn down should be eliminated.

The thermoplastic bushings have worked fine for me since October of 2013. It is important to note that my '97 LX is a non-ABS car. That may or may not make a difference, but it is worth pointing out.

My general perception is that if the TP bushings and sleeves in the kit are installed correctly, bushing resonance/steering wheel oscillation will only occur if hydraulic line pressure falls below a certain point due to normal brake wear.
Wait, so is ur picture correct ? Or u suggesting to flip the bushings as ur red arrows indicate ?
 
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