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A complete projector kit.

Or, since it's a 1990, look for some HIR bulbs (9011/9012).

Here's a write up on them:

http://hirheadlights.com/

However, search Amazon and Ebay for them, don't just buy them from that web site.

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A complete projector kit.

Or, since it's a 1990, look for some HIR bulbs (9011/9012).

Here's a write up on them:

http://hirheadlights.com/

However, search Amazon and Ebay for them, don't just buy them from that web site.

RwP
Not sure what you mean by "a complete projector kit." All I've been able to find is the bulbs with ballast. Not sure if thats what you mean?
 

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Not sure what projectors would fit in the gen 1 housings; the G1 (search ebay) projectors are the smallest I've yet seen. The Retrofit Source's Morimoto Minis are also pretty small, but they're still bigger than the G1s by about 5-10%.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I guess I don't understand what not using the "projectors" would do? I guess I'll just deal with what I got. I'm not gonna spend over $100 just on bulbs. Call me cheap
 

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Not sure what you mean by "a complete projector kit." All I've been able to find is the bulbs with ballast. Not sure if thats what you mean?
It's not.

See, let's talk basic physics here.

The reflectors and flutes in your headlamps are designed to spread out the light from the 9005/9006 bulb (high and low beams) for an "optimum" pattern, and like any reflector, expect the light source to be at a certain location.

For 9005/9006/9011/9012 bulbs, that's a horizontal filament running right/left.

HID bulbs, OTOH, have a horizontal filament that runs front/back.

This means that the light output will lose all focus.

Cleaning the flutes out (to make the front clear) and using a projector refocuses the light so it goes out the front and doesn't just screw up your near field (causing far field blindness, comparatively speaking.)

Another example would be to turn on your dome light and see how far down the road you can see with your headlights, then turn the dome light off, give it about 5 minutes, and see how much further down the road you can see.

Slapping HID bulbs into a housing made for halogens, with the added penalty of the flutes inside the lens, will have the same general effect on the light you're trying to get out there so you can see.

(This doesn't even touch on the color temperature. All this is covered in the stickies in the forum, though, so ... )

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just have my old ballast kits from my HIDs i was gonna reuse. Even with the HID's losing focus still gotta be brighter then what I have now.
 

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I just have my old ballast kits from my HIDs i was gonna reuse. Even with the HID's losing focus still gotta be brighter then what I have now.
Don't confuse brightness for focus.

Your stock headlights flutes focus the beam down the road in a specific area. This is useful for you the driver as it highlights the road directly in front of you, as well as to the sides to a degree, while (if properly adjusted) not blinding oncoming drivers with extra light.

Putting HID headlights in a stock headlight assembly will give you brighter light, but it's not going to be focused down the road. Instead, it will all be up front, almost like having exceptionally bright foglights, you have lots of light, but it all goes about 5 feet in front of the car, not 25 feet away where you need it. The other drawback is that the light is all over the place, not aimed properly, so you will blind other drivers, specifically oncoming traffic with very very bight light.

The purpose of the projectors in HID headlights is to project the light into a focused beam down the road, with a clear "cutoff" of the light beam where oncoming traffic won't be blinded by them. For HID headlights to work properly, you need clear, non fluted lenses on your headlight housings, and proper projectors to focus the beam.

Any other combination will only give you very poor overall lighting.

If your lights are very dim, you have two potential issues. Issue one is the lightbulbs themselves may be worn out. More likely is that your housings are not properly aimed. There are instructions on how to aim your headlights on this site, and it is very simple on a dark night with a wall nearby.
 

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Putting HID headlights in a stock headlight assembly will give you brighter light, but it's not going to be focused down the road. Instead, it will all be up front, almost like having exceptionally bright foglights, you have lots of light, but it all goes about 5 feet in front of the car, not 25 feet away where you need it. The other drawback is that the light is all over the place, not aimed properly, so you will blind other drivers, specifically oncoming traffic with very very bight light.

The purpose of the projectors in HID headlights is to project the light into a focused beam down the road, with a clear "cutoff" of the light beam where oncoming traffic won't be blinded by them. For HID headlights to work properly, you need clear, non fluted lenses on your headlight housings, and proper projectors to focus the beam.

Any other combination will only give you very poor overall lighting.
Not sure if this is your personal experience, but in mine, this is nooot necessarily true...

I put 4300ks in my Mark VIII's non-HID assemblies. It actually worked out a bit better than I was anticipating. The focus is a tad off, but it actually ends up being a little discoloration on one side of the beam focal point rather than a gross disfigurement of the peam pattern. The beam pattern/intensity is unchanged, for the most part, from stock, and there is a good, wide beam spread off the focal point and the focal point itself is projected strongly and clearly down the road. Lighting is improved from stock - not as much as it was when I put projectors in the T-bird - but better than halogens. My primary concern with the mod was to keep housing temps down to prevent the well-known burning of the chrome coating in those style lights. So far, so good; no blinding of oncoming drivers and I'm able to see quite well.

HID projectors are indeed the ultimate solution, but when the design of the housings prevents the simple retrofit without extreme modifications, a proper bulb and careful alignment can allow you to take advantage of the benefits safely.
 

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I'd have to agree with Woodman on this. When I had my 96 I put HIDs in and actually went through a few kits from super cheap to expensive. While not all headlight assemblies are created equal I will say that the light will be focused in the wrong spot for the birds, and cougars, much worse in the fluted assemblies. Even if you manage to find a rebased 9006 D2R bulb you'll probably do a little better but not as good as spending the money on a set of good halogens. Look for PIAA or Hella. A good set will run $80 to $100. Color at 4300k will give the best visibility as that is considered "daylight". 5000k 6000k and so forth is a gimmick and just for look not functionality.
 

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Personally, I put Sylvania Silver Star Ultra bulbs in my stock '94 Cougar housings and couldn't be happier. Granted, they're about $75 a pair, but I can see much better at night, especially after buffing out my stock "brown" lenses.
 

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On the chart the author of that piece wrote, the bulbs I have in mine are around the Ultra +50 range. They're not blue or ultra white, they just seem to be brighter than regular halogen bulbs, and I can see better at night with them.
 
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