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Discussion Starter #1
I have a suspension bracket that the shock mount holes are rounded out,
so when the suspension moves I get a loud clunk for the shock moving around in the mount.
How do I repair the ovaled out holes where the bolt goes through? i can't remove the
shock tower because it is welded to the frame. I thought about drilling two holes lower on the
mount, but there is no room to get a drill anywhwere near the shock mount bolt holes.

B
 

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Exactly where are you talking about? Front shock, rear shock, upper mount shock mount, lower shock mount? :confused:

I can't think of where something could be rounded out. :2huh:

Let us know. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
well, uh, mmm, uh, not exactly an MN12. I have a '78 Bronco with a reamed out sway bar hole in the frame and a '91 S-10 Chevy Blazer 4 door with the mentioned
front shock bracket that has the ovalized holes.
I figured I can fix both problems with the same solution. The Blazer is like any other Chevy I've owned, i have to keep patching it back together to keep it going. At least until I can get something else when my wife goes back to work. 210,000 miles so far, so I expect a few problems here and there.
My Bird is my commuter car to get me back and forth to work for the 60 mile-a-day trip.
The Bronco is my take-off-the-trashtrash/fishing/mud hole whomping/my-truck-is-still bigger-than-your-Hummer truck. 10 MPG downhill in a hurricane.

B
 

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Ok, that helps a little. :leftright

When I have an "ovaled" hole in a mount or frame what I usually try to do is weld a patch (with the proper hole in it) over the whole area. If that's not an option due to the way things fit, then other solution I've done is to build up the "hole" with weld and then re-drill it. But that is a last resort (especially if we’re taking the frame or a suspension piece which may have a temper)! :beek:

If the metal that is ovaled is thick enough, you could fabricate an oval bushing to fit in and then tack it in. Again, that’s not the best solution. :(

Obviously the “proper” solution is to replace the item. :D

Just some thoughts. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I thought about welding a plate and drilling, but there is almost zero romm in there to meneuver. i have to contort just to get the bolt off of the shock tower. i don't think the metal is tempered because it seemed to oval pretty easily. The bolt shows a little wear as well, but not as much as the shock tower. i also thought about building it with some tacks, but I'm not a welder and the Blazer gets driven daily.

i was thinking of something I could put in the holes to take up the slack. some sort of bushing or metal that could "clip" in the holes. It's drivable, just annoying and makes the handeling a bit squirrley.

94 Daily Driven 4.6L, I see you have an old boat. do you ever go over to the iboats.com message board? A lot of good info on boat repair and restoration.

B
 

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At work, we have holes on our vehicles that have a tendancy to oval over time, the fix we use is to have them welded shut, and redrilled. Of course, that's in 3/4" thick aluminum. I don't know if that's an option for you, but welding in a new plate seems like the best fix to me.
 

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My friend's '78 T-bird (Diamond Jubilee edition) ripped out the shock mount in the rear. We just welded a huge washer in and it was a bit of a tight fit.
-Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have two washers in now (one on each ovaled hole), and it improved a good bit. They aren't welded, but they sit on the "shoulder" of the shock mount. I will have to see if I can find some thicker washers and tack weld them in. The ones I have are too thin, but all I had in the old tool shed. They flex so the shock bolt still wiggles some, but not as much.

Good idea. I didn't think about welding the washers :)

Thanks for the ideas,
B
 

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Try to find thick, hardened washers, they will last a lot longer. :thumbsup:

Or, if you're going to be welding in washers anyway, why not just get some plates made that are the right hardness, and can be drilled/cut to fit perfectly. :confused:

Just a thought. :thumbsup:
 

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I have a suspension bracket that the shock mount holes are rounded out,
so when the suspension moves I get a loud clunk for the shock moving around in the mount.
How do I repair the ovaled out holes where the bolt goes through? i can't remove the
shock tower because it is welded to the frame. I thought about drilling two holes lower on the
mount, but there is no room to get a drill anywhwere near the shock mount bolt holes.

B
I found these online "Weld Washers" (Youll have to google them and a company called "RuffStuff". I have a jeep with rear shock mount holes doing the same thing.
 
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