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i know i know such a horrible thing to ask but i live in ohio and winter is in its way already gets a little tail happy when its wet out...sooo any idea how much weight in the rear for the winter?
 

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i know i know such a horrible thing to ask but i live in ohio and winter is in its way already gets a little tail happy when its wet out...sooo any idea how much weight in the rear for the winter?
Enough? :zdunno:

Seriously, every car is gonna be different, try adding bags of sand until it handles the way you like!
 

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I've had the rear wheels in my trunk and I've also used some 50 lbs weights. The best thing I've found is just tires that shed snow.. I have a pair of tires that I literally use 2 months[They go on Mid-December and come off in February] out of the year and I find they are worth it.

Ice. Slush. Rain. Weight doesn't seem to do a whole lot. Just avoid driving like the winter ditch dwellers... ;)
 

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Trac lok must be heavy, but the best bet for winter driving
 

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A couple bodies should do.. :D


Actually when I was driving an MN12 in the winter..I had about 200 lbs of speaker box/amps..That seemed to help alot..

:zdunno:




Rayo..
 

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Where I live they don't plow very often and it's much too cold for salt to be effective so we have to get good at driving on hard packed snow.
The biggest difference you can make is with tire selection.
I have goodyear ultragrip ice, they are worth every penny.

Not many people here add weight to their cars or trucks for traction. In case of an accident, those items usually become large and heavy flying projectiles.
 

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Without trak-lok and winter tires, the T-Bird ranks up there with the worst winter cars of all time.

I have neither, and have gotten stuck on a piece of snow the size of a snowball in my driveway backing up, had to burn thru it!

I just stay home. Wonder if Enterprise rents AWD vehicles? Then have them pick you up!

Al
 

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I used to have about 200 lbs in the trunk against the rear seats, but then I just bit the bullet for snow tires and ditched the weight in the trunk (more weight = more distance to come to a stop).
 

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My tools, sub, amp, jack, spare, extra fluids. 70-80lbs. The truth is, open diff + all season tires = unhappy driving. Everyone here seems to agree.
 

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I can say this for the Trac-Lok - I don't have one in either my Bird or Mark and though I have no snow here in Florida, if I go down in the grassy ditch, I have a hard time getting out.

Yesterday, my boss had to turn around and drove his Town Car down DEEP in the ditch and I though sure we would be stuck like Chuck! It drove right out, didn't even start to spin, so I figure it HAS to have a TL in the rear. They do make a HUGE difference in pulling on slippery surfaces.
 

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Beer and Cheese
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My first thunderbird was a daily driver. I had two 25 pound sand bags in the trunk with good winter tires on the rear. People will fight me on this every time I post it. I will never drive in snow with a heavy RWD car again with the winters we have (used to have) around here. I'm a good driver in the snow, but I've always had better control, handling and stopping with a 4WD or FWD car or truck.
 

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My first thunderbird was a daily driver. I had two 25 pound sand bags in the trunk with good winter tires on the rear. People will fight me on this every time I post it, but I'll never drive in snow with a heavy RWD car again with the winters we have (used to have) around here. I'm a pretty good driver in the snow, but I've always had better control, handling and stopping with a 4WD or FWD car or truck.
Josh, I'm from Maine and I totally agree with your statement; FWD/4WD always goes up more hills in the snow/ice!
 

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Josh, I'm from Maine and I totally agree with your statement; FWD/4WD always goes up more hills in the snow/ice!
I just remember past "Winter Driving" threads of guys chest bumping about snow driving with a RWD. Yes it's fun, but when you need to get to work on time during a snow storm with your face glued to the windshield it's not. I have since owned a FWD car and a 4WD truck. One thing to add, have a small shovel and a gallon bucket of sand ready if you get stuck.
 

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I'm in agreement with pretty much everyone else in this thread. Back when the old '89 Cougar LS (and then the Splitport '94 LX) was my sole means of transportation, I'd slap on a set of winter tires and that was it. If things were really bad, I'd put a set of tire cables on the rear tires. Those things worked very well when it came to getting traction on hard packed snow and ice. As a matter of fact, I think I still have them here if anyone wants them for cheap.

Adding weight never really seemed to make a difference. Good snow tires, a Trak-Lok, and tire cables got me through those years.
 

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Josh, I'm from Maine and I totally agree with your statement; FWD/4WD always goes up more hills in the snow/ice!
I am reminded of the day when I was riding in the back seat with my brother along with my parents in my dad's old 90 base one evening. We were trying to go up a shallow hill (maybe 3-5 degree incline) that was covered in ice - every other car on the road had no problems going up (and around) us, but my dad could not convince the bird to go up that hill for anything. After about 5 minutes of spinning the tires and only embarrassing himself, he decided to take an alternate route.

Added weight did us no good then, don't see how it would do any good now. :)
 

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Added weight in the very back of the trunk does help, no doubt about it, just not as much as good tires and trak-lok does. Extra passengers dont help, it has to be in the very back to shift the weight bias. The same rule applies that applies for drag racing.

I remember as a kid getting our car stuck, my dad had me sit in the trunk to get it un-stuck, it worked!

Al
 

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I carry my tool box and sub all year round ~100lbs. Done this in all three of my MN-12s and it boils down to just being a smart driver. Use the pedals lightly and learn to steer with the skinny pedal.

Honestly I haven't noticed any difference in any of the traction option (traction control, trac-lok or open). On ice it don't matter what you have there is no traction and on snow just think before you act.
 
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