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Discussion Starter #1
How To Resurface a Flywheel



I need to replace the clutch, and I want a “new” clutch surface on my flywheel so the clutch will operate problem free.

The first step is to have the flywheel cleaned of oil , grease and grime.
This flywheel is in decent shape minimal warp and few hot spots



I found my Ford Dark Blue Spray Paint!!



Next is to mount the flywheel to the machine
Move the flywheel under the grinding stone, and touch off….


Each pass is only .002 -.003 deep per cut


See the sparks?

Now that we have a good surface for the clutch disc to mate too…


One last thing to do is to knock in the pressure plate alignment pins


All done…
 

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What kinda of wicked medieval cutterhead is the flywheel bolted to? that thing looks like a beast!

It's hard to tell from the pics, but the finish looks kinda hammered. From the few sparks and the color it looks like the wheel needs to be dressed.
 

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It doesn't need to be super smooth... just level and consistent...
Correct! Technically, it's not supposed to be smooth. Gotta have a friction surface for the clutch disc to grab. Ever look at brake rotors or drums after they've been turned? Same idea... Course I didn't think smoothness was what Kaptn' Obvious was talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the machine is a 1964 VanNorman Rotory Broach, old school for sure, it was mainly used for surfacing, and still in use in many machine shops, it will provide a decent finish on cast iron heads/blocks using a composite gasket.

This one has the flywheel grinding attachment, not all did.

It is a beast, with 10 carbide blade inserts, and stops for nothing in the way it can cut up to .050 or more from a cast iron head in one pass if you so wish.
I use it only for grinding flywheels now
 
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