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Discussion Starter #1
I have a new fan assembly. Before installing, I would like to test the motor.

Any suggestions?
 

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It goes straight to the battery; look at the wires; they are Low speed, high speed, and ground.

The ground should be easy to pick out, and there's a wiring diagram here if you look for it.

Hold tight, and don't lose any fingers, lol.
 

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It's new, my suggestion is to put it in! We're not talking about a really hard job here.

The fan is not meant to run w/o being mounted, too dangerous.

EDIT: install tip, you can swap out the fan w/o removing the upper rad hose/coolant. IIRC, I removed one coil pack to squeeze the thing out of there.

Al
 

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The fan is not meant to run w/o being mounted, too dangerous.


Al
Agreed.

I've been working on a driver for a Mark 8 fan, that's been lots of fun. :grin2:

I have it bolted to a desk; it draws over 70A at startup, if you don't use a PWM driver.
 

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It's new, my suggestion is to put it in! We're not talking about a really hard job here.

The fan is not meant to run w/o being mounted, too dangerous.

EDIT: install tip, you can swap out the fan w/o removing the upper rad hose/coolant. IIRC, I removed one coil pack to squeeze the thing out of there.

Al
+1

When scouring a junkyard for a fan, I had unplugged the old fan and plugged the other in with it just resting on top of the radiator. Needless to say when I turned the key to check the fan it promptly kicked itself around and could have damaged something or someone had they been in the right or wrong spot. At least I knew it worked but had someone been trying to hold it down I'd figure someone would have had some torn up fingers.

Yours is new so just install it already. I too managed to install one without removing the rad hose but I usually go ahead and get it out of the way because it's sooo much easier if you do.
 

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Assuming the new part is just a motor, you may have to make a trip or two to the hardware store for bolts and nuts. They have to be just the right length, with lock washers, etc.

Obviously, you have to grind away the factory rivets from the old fan shroud. You would think a job like this would not require a die grinder!

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It goes straight to the battery; look at the wires; they are Low speed, high speed, and ground.

The ground should be easy to pick out, and there's a wiring diagram here if you look for it.

Hold tight, and don't lose any fingers, lol.
The new fan assembly didn't have an indicator for the ground, so I went by the wire colors on the existing connector.

Top wire/pin: black = ground (of course)
Middle wire/pin: blue = low speed
Bottom wire/pin: black w/orange stripe = high speed

After testing the both assemblies and removing the old, I could see the old unit had a marker for the ground. The old unit worked. It was just VERY noisy, intermittently. The new fan runs quietly. Not whisper quiet, but much better. :smile2:

Last summer, my shop direct-wired the fan. So, the noise was not a fan speed issue, probably just a bearing going bad?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Assuming the new part is just a motor, you may have to make a trip or two to the hardware store for bolts and nuts. They have to be just the right length, with lock washers, etc.

Obviously, you have to grind away the factory rivets from the old fan shroud. You would think a job like this would not require a die grinder!

Al
I replaced the entire assembly. It was only a few dollars more than just a motor. I couldn't find a Ford part, so I went with NAPA. It looks like they used cheap hardware that will rust in less than a year. I may replace it with stainless.
 
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