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I'm wondering if anybody else has experienced something quite like this with their Thunderbird/Cougar. Mine in particular is the '95 TBird with the 4.6l, automatic.
It has zero power. Sometimes when I go out to stare angrily at it, I end up opening the door, and occasionally there's power for a second.
I had the battery and alternator tested and they were fine. Yet, it completely lost power while driving just 2 minutes down the street from where it was tested at.
In the time since I've replaced fuses. Took a volt meter around poking at grounds checking resistance, nothing I could find. I've done the wiggling wires thing but it doesn't yield results.
While it was driving the radio and ac were going wild, the battery gauge in the car as well. Radio fuse is fine as well...
I'm at a loss. When I turn the key it does nothing. And nothing requiring power works.
 

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The main wire to either the starter or the ground is bad.

Wiggle the big wires from the battery, and it will probably start.

Replace them.

Check the huge fuse at the bottom of the fusebox, those rust too.
 

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I'm with Grog6, it's going to be one of the main wires coming off the battery or even the connections at the battery themselves... the steel terminals are a **** design but they're good at being low-profile. I've already had to replace mine and it's only been less than a month.

My ground cable was loose and caused the car to start and run to go to lunch, but be dead when trying to start it coming back. Yanked off the shat-on terminal, cleaned the crud off the copper, stuck a shiny new Duralast Gold terminal on (because it looked like the highest quality one between the 'zone and oh-really's), and sprayed it with terminal protectant (also from autozone). I have these terminals on our F-150 also, they've been on there almost a year now and look just as good as when I put them on.

I did both positive and negative on my car.
 

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A digital multi-meter will lie when looking at battery cables; it needs a tiny trickle of power to read, and the voltage goes away as soon as you put a substantial load on it.

Put one meter lead on the starter terminal (+), one at the battery ground1 (-), then hit the starter.

A Working Cable will drop a couple of volts when the starter hits, a bad one will drop all of it. :)

If the voltage at the battery goes below 8V, it will reset the eec, and will never start.
 
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