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shaken, not stirred
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That is crazy, I didnt know Bud had a theme park :). And did anyone else catch that InBev is stated to have been around since 1366?

C.Hill
 

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You've never heard of "Busch Gardens"?

They got em all over the place. Tampa, Williamsburg, Orlando, and I think in St. Louis.
 

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That is crazy, I didn't know Bud had a theme park :). And did anyone else catch that InBev is stated to have been around since 1366?

C.Hill
You've never heard of "Busch Gardens"?

They got em all over the place. Tampa, Williamsburg, Orlando, and I think in St. Louis.
They also own SeaWorld.


I hope they do turn the offer down and don't accept any counter-offers. They could learn a lesson from Yahoo's refusal of the Microsoft offer. I'd hate to see a great American company sell out to foreigners for any price.

Unfortunately the ultimate decision can't be made by CEO, August Bush IV alone, but will fall to other controlling shareholders (namely Warren Buffet) and British financial services giant Barclays.
 

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I for one hope it doesn't go through. Living here all my life I can't imagine Bud being owned by a foreign company. They say they wouldn't make any changes to the brew, etc..., but we all know how that goes.

I don't know a lot about politics, nor do I care to, but I am tired of seeing American companies being sold to forein intrests. I think it's sad that someone can come in, offer shareholders $65 a share and take another piece of American heritage, all in the name of the $. I know the stock has been flat at what, $45-50/share for years, but still. I for one would rather have the company remain American, just like it has for the last 100+ years.

I'd be willing to bet that if AB trims some fat on their own, that they could increase profits w/o selling out. They not only contribute a lot to the local STL area, but to many other places/charities. Do you think if InBev gets ahold of it that once they are done making cuts to the budget that this will continue? I highly doubt it.

They also say it would give them new markets to sell to. To who? The Germans certainly won't drink a watery American lager.

All I can do is hope that the shareholders and Busch family listen to what the public is saying, and save one of the biggest American icons that we have left that we can truly call our own. And yes, I do drink AB products, for the record :D

Just my .02

:zbeer:

Jay
 

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One big problem is that Warren Buffet thinks they should sell it. That's a pretty ****ty deal when one's integrity can be bought. I read that they're going to maybe close down some of the Busch Gardens; not the one in ST Louis though. Because of the contributions they make I bet if they sell out the things that are free like The Science Center, and the Zoo probably will turn into $50 attractions like everywhere else in this country. I have friends whose parents and grandparents have worked there forever. If AB happened to shut down it would be like another Ford shutdown.
 

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One big problem is that Warren Buffet thinks they should sell it. That's a pretty ****ty deal when one's integrity can be bought. I read that they're going to maybe close down some of the Busch Gardens; not the one in ST Louis though. Because of the contributions they make I bet if they sell out the things that are free like The Science Center, and the Zoo probably will turn into $50 attractions like everywhere else in this country. I have friends whose parents and grandparents have worked there forever. If AB happened to shut down it would be like another Ford shutdown.

And that is the issue I have w/ the whole idea. While I can see Buffet's side of things as an investor/stock holder, etc..., I just personally couldn't bring myself to allow another one of America's great companies to be bought, regardless of the profit. You have to draw the line somewhere. I try to understand the whole "free market/global economy" thing, but I just can't see how selling of another one of America's greatest icons helps people in the long run. I guess since I don't base my life on the almighty dollar I will never understand.

I guess they would sell Grant's Farm as well, seeing as how it would just be another drain on their profits. And with the Zoo being one of the last free ones in the US, I'm sure they would find a way to make their money back on that as well. Although IIRC, the property tax on the Zoo and Science Center is payed by the residents of STL, so hopefully that would remain as-is as long as other companies would step up to help keep it free.

Jay
 

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shaken, not stirred
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You've never heard of "Busch Gardens"?

They got em all over the place. Tampa, Williamsburg, Orlando, and I think in St. Louis.
I have heard of all of those excpet for the STL one, i dindt know they had one in STL. But I didnt know it was Busch as in "Busch Beer". I was hoping it was going to turn out to be like a "beer-land" or somthing like that. lol

C.Hill
 

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....I was hoping it was going to turn out to be like a "beer-land" or somthing like that. lol

C.Hill
Well, you can get free beer there. At least you could the last time I took the brewery tour in Williamsburg. Limit is 2. :D
 

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shaken, not stirred
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Well, you can get free beer there. At least you could the last time I took the brewery tour in Williamsburg. Limit is 2. :D
Ya the tour in STL you get 2 free beers there as well.

C.Hill
 

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Yea, it would be nice to see this playing out the other way around. A-B is big enough to pull it off but smart enough not to go there. Apparently ImBev is not.

Like every other take over it's not about making a better product but eliminating (consuming) the competition. It's all about the money.
 

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Yea, it would be nice to see this playing out the other way around. A-B is big enough to pull it off but smart enough not to go there. Apparently ImBev is not.

Like every other take over it's not about making a better product but eliminating (consuming) the competition. It's all about the money.

imbev was originally acquired because their regional distributors in the US did a piss-poor job, hence A-B stepped in and provided a more consistent and stable distribution process with their distributors.
 

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It's all about the Money

InBev raises offer for brewer Anheuser-Busch
Reports: Maker of Bud beer is likely to accept sweetened buyout offer

Well, they're gonna do it. No more American ownership. :bawling:

~Long Live the King of Beers!~

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25637808/
 

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inbev

Fu*k inbev!
 

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The weak dollar and the bad economy make US companies prime for takeover. The oil rich counties will own most of the US before long.
 

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Its a done deal!

Anheuser-Busch agrees to sale to a Belgian brewer
By CHRISTOPHER LEONARD • ASSOCIATED PRESS • July 14, 2008

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ST. LOUIS — Anheuser-Busch, the maker of Budweiser and Bud Light, has agreed to a takeover by a giant Belgian brewer, a union that creates a global beer leader and brings to an end one of the most iconic names in American business.


The board of directors of Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. on Sunday accepted a sweetened $52 billion takeover offer from Belgian brewer InBev SA, according to a joint press release.

The deal, which is subject to shareholders’ and regulators’ approval, would create the world’s largest brewer and create the fourth-largest consumer product company worldwide.

“This combination will create a stronger, more competitive global company with an unrivaled worldwide brand portfolio and distribution network, with great potential for growth all over the world,” Carlos Brito, CEO of InBev, said in the statement.

For InBev, the maker of Stella Artois and Beck’s, the deal gives an aggressive company an iconic beer brand — Budweiser — to sell into emerging markets where it has already established a firm footprint.

InBev is the world’s second-largest beer-maker behind SABMiller. Anheuser-Busch is by far the largest brewer in the U.S. with more than 48 percent of the market share.

Brito will be chief executive officer of the combined company, which will be named Anheuser-Busch-InBev. Shareholders will receive $70 a share, a $5 increase over the offer Anheuser-Busch rejected in June.

It wasn’t immediately clear how long approval might take. Several Missouri politicians have expressed concerns about the merger — especially how it would affect the approximate 6,000 people employed by Anheuser-Busch in St. Louis.

InBev said it plans to use St. Louis as its North American headquarters, and that it will keep open all 12 of Anheuser-Busch’s North American breweries.

InBev announced its intent to try and purchase Anheuser-Busch on June 11. The Anheuser-Busch board initially voted against the merger, calling the initial $65 per share offer too low.

That prompted much squabbling between the companies over the past few weeks. InBev filed a motion seeking the removal of all 13 Anheuser-Busch board members; Anheuser-Busch filed suit calling the InBev effort an “illegal scheme” that threatened to defraud Anheuser-Busch shareholders. Among other things, the suit noted that InBev failed to disclose it operates a brewery in Cuba.

Few products are associated with America as much as Budweiser. Its Clydesdale horses are fixtures of Super Bowl ads, and even the label is red, white and blue, with an eagle swooping through the “A.”

“This agreement provides additional and certain value for Anheuser-Busch shareholders, while enhancing global market access for Budweiser, one of America’s true iconic brands,” August Busch IV, Anheuser-Busch president and CEO, said in the statement.

The merger, if completed, also will bring to an end a name synonymous with St. Louis. From college buildings to theme parks to offices to the stadium where the Cardinals play baseball, the Busch name is virtually everywhere in the Gateway City.

Eberhard Anheuser acquired the Bavarian brewery in 1860 and renamed it E. Anheuser & Co. His son-in-law, Adolphus Busch, joined the company in 1864 and it was eventually renamed Anheuser-Busch.

The company survived Prohibition by selling products ranging from ice cream to root beer.

In addition to opposition from politicians and civic leaders, at least two Web sites sprung up opposing the merger. SaveBudweiser.com claims to have more than 60,000 signatures from merger opponents. SaveAB.com hosted a recent anti-merger rally that drew hundreds to downtown St. Louis.

InBev has not said if layoffs will occur as a result of the merger. The company said it expects cost synergies of at least $1.5 billion a year by 2011 over three years. The deal won’t benefit earnings per share until 2010, it said.

Even without the merger, Anheuser-Busch said last month it planned to cut pension and health benefits for salaried employees as part of an effort to slash $1 billion in costs by the end of 2010. The plan called for offering early retirement to 1,300 salaried workers 55 and older.

The cost-cutting effort was part of a strategy to fend off the merger. Anheuser-Busch also owns a 50 percent share in Grupo Modelo, Mexico’s leading brewer, and a 27 percent share in China brewer Tsingtao.
 
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