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Discussion Starter #1
Having read some posts regarding the availability of different types of ignition lock cylinders (A through E types), my question is this:

What difference does it make which type I order?

I mean, the part for the door locks is not cut into the new keys yet. So everything should work if I replace my current keys with
the blank ones I get with the cylinder and have a locksmith cut the part of the door locks into those, or am I oversimplifying things here?

Hell, everything is better than the Lincoln cylinder the previous owner put in, the key will only come out of the ignition when it's in the
accessories position.

Tommy
 

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I don't understand what you mean by A-E types. I've bought replacements locks from auto parts stores and straight from Ford where they come with the different tumblers and you can match your current key when you put the cylinder together before you install it.

There are 5 different tumblers for each key notch - maybe that is what you mean by A-E. :zdunno:
Which you use depends on your current key.
When I put the together, I start at the last notch, make sure I've installed the current tumbler in that position by trying key.
After the first tumbler is correct, I move to the next and test the install by making sure the key still turns.
I do this each time until I have all the tumblers (I can't remember if there is 5 or 6 and I don't have my keys in my hand) installed.

Here is a video of how it's done (it's a chevy in this case): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2ZZeMAqn7s
Maybe when I rebuilt the cylinders in the past, they were always GM products - maybe you can't even do a Ford tumbler this way. I can't remember! :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, Rockauto lists a bunch of generic locks, but the Motorcraft ones appear to be 5 different parts/cuts. Does it matter which one I get? I mean, the ignition part of the lock and key is only used by the ignition cylinder and I can get the door lock part cut into the blank part of the key by a locksmith.

Worst case scenario the ignition lock part of the key will no longer match the VIN, so cutting keys by VIN number will no longer be possible.

Tommy
 

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Save yourself all this hassle and order from wolfsecurityhardware on eBay -- link --> http://r.ebay.com/YgqBut

I bought a new ignition cylinder from him for my 96. I took a good photo of my existing key & emailed it to him, he keyed the new cylinder to match for $9. It was cheaper than going to the local locksmith. (you can also email him one of your keys and he'll key it to match for the same $9).
 

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TMW - you probably have it solved already (just seeing this month-old string now) but just in case, here is what I offer:

A-E is just a measure of the depth of the cut on position #6. The higher the letter the deeper the cut. Positions (starting from the tip) #1-4 and 6 do the ignition lock, positions 5 and 7-10 do the door locks. Does position #6 also correspond to the door locks and do you need to match your new key and cylinder to the one you replace? I don't know but that's what I did. When I went to my local Ford dealer to replace the lock cylinder about five years ago I was left needing three keys after paying lots of money. When I needed to replace it again about six months ago I did it myself and now I only need two keys. It was easy. Although the link above is a competitive price and I think even less than what I paid for the OEM cylinder through Rockauto even with the key matching service.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the reply Jim.
From what you said and what I read in this thread Question about Ford keys I understand that it doesn't matter which cylinder I order, as long as I have a locksmith cut the door portion from my old keys into the blank keys that come with the lock.
As long as positions 1-4 and 6 don't interfere in some way with positions 5 and 7-10, it will work. Worst case scenario (80% chance) I won't be able to use the old (worn) keys anymore, but with the new keys cut to match my door locks, why would I want to :D

Tommy
 

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Pretty good video I'm replacing my lock pretty soon . my sometimes start the car without the key.
 

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I know this was an old post, but just saw a locksmith yesterday to match up my door/ignition on my keys. He told me that some of the tumblers are 5 wafer and some are 6. I have a 5 wafer ignition and a 6 wafer door. He can change the wafer count in any of the locks to match the other, and get 1 key fits all. For me, expense vs convenience, I'll just keep using 1 for the door, 1 for the ignition, and 1 for the trunk,
 

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1 key fits all would be nice.. :)

Why do you have 3 different keys for your car?..Did someone trying breaking in it, or something?

I have the square key for the ignition, and the doors..Then the round key for the trunk, and the glove box..






Rayo..
 

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For me, I had to change out the ignition lock. I did that in the past, but guess I got lucky and got a 6 wafer lock. Locksmith cut my new keys and no problem. This current ignition lock was put in by a shop (I didn't have time to do it, commuting 150mi round trip every day for a new job, traded boat work for the car work) and it turns out it's a 5 wafer lock. Add the trunk key = 3 keys. Changed the glovebox latch a couple months ago, so no key for that. Never locked it anyway. Figured if they broke into the car, what good is locking the glovebox?? B|
 
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