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Discussion Starter #1
Just finished up replacing the front upper control arms, front/rear rotors and pads, and the front wheel hub assemblies on my mom's 02 Mercury Mountaineer...I am thoroughly tired out and finally read for some sleep. I have no idea how RobertP does this for a living, and I'm younger than he is! :eek: :tongue:

I'm sure a lift helps a bit, bending over and working with a jack and two jack stands isn't ideal lmao, neither is the fact that I used all hand tools. :eek:
 

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Yep last winter I did both lower control arms, strut rod bushings, tie rod ends, upper control arms, and then my sisters F150.. i did front rotors, brakes, and wheel bearings. It was a rough weekend. Not exactly my cup of tea. Oh and not nearly as satisfying as doing performance upgrades... I feel like dropping the tranny for the mark 8 converter was easier.. Glad to have almost a brand new front end tho..
 

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It's very rewarding, at least to me, when you can drive down the road not sounding like your car is going to fall apart when you take a turn. lol
 

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Fix it or the cat gets it! *mew* lol
 

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F air tools. electric cordless are the way to go.
Electric cordless cant get into the tight spots like the slim air rachets. Theres a tool for every situation, a real mechanic dosnt complain .. just gets the job done.
 

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^^^Word.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
SCT bird is right about a tool for each situation, air tools can be pretty compact, but the air hose hanging around can be hard to get into tight spots, some electric tools are pretty bulky as well. I definately need to get one or the other going here lmao. I'm limited to only hand tools because our garage is too small for a compressor.
 

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I'm limited to only hand tools because our garage is too small for a compressor.
Gotta start somewhere .. I only had hand tools when I really started wrenching on cars in 1996. After you get your basic tools, then step up to the air tools or electric, etc .. you start collecting the specialty tools - the ones you only use one time, or they only work on one particular job and then they sit in your tool box for years unless you work at a dealership and only get one type of car - then your tools are geared towards that car only ( mercedes - torx sockets, that $900 set of electrical adapters so you dont mess up the connectors doing diagnostic probing work .. )

Then you learn tricks from other mechanics - like the head replacement job you dreaded doing on your Chevy 4.2 Inline six, because in order to get the head off - you need to discharge the A/C system, to pull the timing cover off, you drop the oil pan to remove the pump pickup .. or you can buy the $300 tool that holds the timing chain in place, that sometimes slips off and your chain falls making you have to do it the long way ( 20 hour total job ) .. or you talk to the Chevy tech who says they prop the hood up, and tie the chain to the hood with a rope to gain a few hours on a flat rate job. :tongue:

I agree that Mountaineer job you did sounds exhausting. If you said that same list of parts on a Tbird, no sweat .. piece of cake.
 

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I have found that it helps if you start early in the morning and give your body a chance to get acclimated to the heat.

From 7-11 am the temp goes from 70-80 degrees, but doesn't drop back down to 80 until 9:00 pm the same day.

Keep a couple of water bottles in a cooler with plenty of ice and refill the bottles if you need to.

The humidity from the constant rain has kept me inside a lot this year. I need to get under the hood of the Silverado and the Underbird, but have wussed out so far this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have found that it helps if you start early in the morning and give your body a chance to get acclimated to the heat.

From 7-11 am the temp goes from 70-80 degrees, but doesn't drop back down to 80 until 9:00 pm the same day.

Keep a couple of water bottles in a cooler with plenty of ice and refill the bottles if you need to.

The humidity from the constant rain has kept me inside a lot this year. I need to get under the hood of the Silverado and the Underbird, but have wussed out so far this summer.
SCTBird, you again are very right, there are many ways to speed up a job, and having the right tools for the job speeds things along and makes things much easier, but again like you said it's all in how much you spend on tools. Yeah I wish I was doing the cougar, I already have and it's a snap, then again I was on base with a full car lift and air tools and every special tool known to man :tongue:

Torinocator you are very right, I started late at night, and I was already somewhat tired (10p.m.) and to top things off I allowed myself to get slightly dehydrated, plust the mosquitos swarming me from having the garage door open didn't help, by the time I finished at 1:30a.m., I thought I was going to collapse lol. Definately stay hydrated! ;)
 
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