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Discussion Starter #1
Today I went to MAACO out of sheer curiousity for what they might say. I have some severe clear coat peel on the hood, trunk, bumper, and sail panels of the car. I talked to a person there and he told me that in order to get a really good paint job then I would need to strip each of those parts down to the bare metal and then prime and paint. He went on to tell me that the clear coat is peeling and causing the primer underneath to crack, he said that if all I did was sand it then primer and paint it would be all splochy in the end.

What I don't understand is that he wants to strip each of those panels but leave the rest of the car alone and then prime it like that. Why not just sand the clearcoat then prime and paint. He wanted around 500 bux just to strip the paint from the panels mentioned above.

Another question: Can I prime with rattle can, I know that this is a controversial topic on this site but I don't understand it too much. If I sand all the clear coat off and then prime with a primer/sealer from a rattle can wouldn't that be the same as having MAACO prep it?

In the end I'm just asking for some advice on this, I plan on keeping this car through the end of college which is about another 2 years. I want to get it all painted and rims installed by the end of March the latest.

Thanks to all those that reply. :)
 

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Maaco has the reputation for the kind of quality paint job that you can count the number of years it lasts on one hand. Not entirely sure on the old paint, but if it goes past the clear and into the base.. it's safer to take it all down and build from the metal up. If the rest of the paint is good, you don't need to do the same thing as it's still bonding and the new paint will adhere as long as it's prepped right. It's more a chemical thing than physical adhesion. That's likely one reason why spray-bomb primer isn't suggested. Prep work can make or break a paint job, in the end.
 

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I've heard that once the clear coat is gone you need to take it down to the metal for a decent repaint to last, otherwise it will eventually bubble/flake/peel where the clearcoat was damaged.

Once the clearcoat is penetrated the underlying base coat is penetrated and damaged by the weather and thus the adhesion problems...

Frankly I'm surprised Maaco actually gave you good advise as to what's needed to actually get a good paint job that will last, not that I would trust them to actually paint the car! no way!

I wouldn't used a spray can on a car for anything other then very small spot work myself...otherwise I'd work hard to scrap up the change to have a professional do it right.

Personally, If I were a painter or running a paint shop I wouldn't want anything to do with guaranteeing the paint job on a car that the owner prepped and spray bombed with primer himself...
 

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Strip the panels yourself. Go to an autobody supply store and buy 2 gallons of aviation stripper (I think they run like $30/gal) and pour it on, then spread it around with a 3" paint brush, then let it sit for like 15 minutes, then scrape all the paint off, wash it down with thinner to neutralize it, and sand what little is left with some 180 grit paper and prime it. That is the exact same procedure maaco uses and you can do it yourself pretty easily and save a lot of money. Only thing is be really careful with the stripper. You don't want to get any of it on your skin, your clothes, or anywhere on the car that you don't want stripped. Tape off the area with duct tape and masking paper and be sure to cover all the seams so none gets down in them.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I actually thought of doing that exact thing, what do I prime it with? I have no problem with stripping, its the painting that will do me in.

And yea I was pretty surprised about MAACO's advise too, thats because its under new management. I went there earlier in the year before my paint got really bad and all they had to say was sand all the clear off and we'll paint it for you. I'm definitely not considering getting it painted by them but I was just curious about what they would have to say.
 

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You can use rattle-can primer, just make sure you use the high build stuff. It isn't quite as good as what a body shop will use, but if they primer over your spray can primer, you won't have a problem.

Mike
 
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