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Discussion Starter #1
I have been asked this question a few times so I figured I would tell everyone how I install 3/8 cooler lines.
First off if you're not installing a cooler(one that can flow the 3/8 lines) don't bother you won't help anything.
Here is a list of what is required.

You need fittings for your transmission. I like to buy these fittings from a junkyard. They usually charge me about 5 dollars if I remove them myself. They are most easily found in FWD gm cars with the 4t60e and 4t65e transmissions(these are the larger cars with overdrive transmissions) fittings from A4LD aerostar transmissions may work as well Ford sells these fittings for about $14 each just ask for fittings from an explorer 4r70w.
Now you need fittings for your radiator. They are easy to get from any parts store.
The size on them is 1/4npt-3/8barb. You will have to connect to the radiator using rubber hose (use the transmission hose fuel line will not last).
The cooler you purchased should include enough hose to make this connection.
Then you need a 60inch piece of 3/8 steel line and a 48inch piece of 3/8 steel line.
Braided steel line is nicer but way more expensive.
Make sure you connect the cooler to the transmission correctly. aod/e and 4r70w transmission use the top fitting as the return line. AOD transmission use the bottom fitting as the return line.
You should route the cooler after the radiator for best cooling.
Don't forget to flare any steel lines you cut to prevent the hoses from blowing off.
Alan
 

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That's very good information. Now I have to spend more money on my transmission overhaul :eek: If you don't have a flare tool you could sacrifice a compression union. The ferrule works great to keep a hose on. You could cut off the brass fitting after the ferrule is tight. I use a double flare tool insert to put a little bulge in the line.

Radiator shops that prefer installing new radiators would have piles of those fittings. New radiators come with them. I have a pile of 'em thanks to several Ford Explorers having leaky radiators :)

Question concerning converter lockup. Let me start with a story.

Years ago we had a Hyundai or something like that with a km175 series tranny in the shop that died every time it was put in gear.
I figured it was like a GM125 with the lockup solenoid plugged up causing the converter to lock constantly. Nope. Pulled the tranny before figuring out the rubber cooler hose had collapsed. Shop air wouldn't go through it. Converter was fine after new hoses were installed.

Would the converter clutch on any transmission lockup or drag with the cooler plugged or restricted? I've wondered that since the converter always hooks straight to the cooler on fluid flow schematics. Never really had the gumption to try it.

Most new cars have 3/8 or 12mm cooler lines so we know it has to be better. Would the larger lines effect lockup in any way?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The larger lines will not affect lockup,but if you do not have cooler flow the converter should drag the clutch as the flow should enter the converter in the center of the input shaft. That should push the lockup piston back. Not that it makes any difference you're going to cook the entire transmission if you do not have cooler flow. The only adverse affect of big lines is that with a huge stall converter and 3/8 lines going to the radiator first the engine may begin to run a little warmer.
Alan
 
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