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Go to the hardware store, buy ~10 lbs of lead and a nice wooden handle.

Drill a large hole thru the handle on the side you want to be the face.

Build a wood mold the size you want your hammer to be.

Wearing leather gloves, protective clothing, a face shield, and boots:

Melt the lead in a steel can with a propane torch.

Adding flux will make for a better pour...read directions carefully.

Heat the mold and handle with the torch, making sure there is no water on either.

Put handle in mold, pour lead around handle, let cool.

The drill hole is full of lead, and will keep the head from coming off.

You will have to rework it every few years; cut it all off the handle, remelt it, and repour it.

Don't pour molten anything into a wet mold; you won't like it, and you'll make babies cry when you walk by... :D

Don't use lead free alloys; they're too soft.
 

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Why do you need a lead hammer? Couldn't you use a dead blow hammer found just about anywhere that sells tools i.e. Sears, Harbor Freight, etc.?
 

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Why do you need a lead hammer? Couldn't you use a dead blow hammer found just about anywhere that sells tools i.e. Sears, Harbor Freight, etc.?
the hammer is to be used on the knockoff hubs on a set of gold daytons, the metal is softer so it wont mar the gold, but wont bounce upon impact.
 

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A good dead blow hammer has a plastic face that wont mar and is full of lead shot so it shouldn't bounce on impact either.
Just trying to give him some options if finding a lead hammer is very difficult.
 

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I've always seen people use rawhide hammers for knockoffs.
 

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Now if making my Tungsten hammer were that easy... :D

Dude asked about a lead hammer; I told him how to get there. :confused:


Personally, I wouldn't use a lead hammer for knockoffs either; if they're plated or painted, it will take the coating off.

A rawhide hammer is the way to go, and less dangerous to transport as well.

And, if the wheel won't come off, you can beat the hammer with a rock to get the wheel off, and not harm the finish. :)
 

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Go to the hardware store, buy ~10 lbs of lead and a nice wooden handle.

Drill a large hole thru the handle on the side you want to be the face.

Build a wood mold the size you want your hammer to be.

Wearing leather gloves, protective clothing, a face shield, and boots:

Melt the lead in a steel can with a propane torch.

Adding flux will make for a better pour...read directions carefully.

Heat the mold and handle with the torch, making sure there is no water on either.

Put handle in mold, pour lead around handle, let cool.

The drill hole is full of lead, and will keep the head from coming off.

You will have to rework it every few years; cut it all off the handle, remelt it, and repour it.

Don't pour molten anything into a wet mold; you won't like it, and you'll make babies cry when you walk by... :D

Don't use lead free alloys; they're too soft.
And probably enjoy the brain damage after heating and inhaling/contacting lead :)
 

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I have always used a rubber hammer to break loose the spinners on knock-off wheels
 

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And probably enjoy the brain damage after heating and inhaling/contacting lead :)
I've worked with lead everyday for the last 30 years; that probably explains a lot... :tongue: (I'm an electronics guy)

Casting lead is very useful; I make bullets, even jacketed ones, as well as shotgun slugs. Firearms are much cheaper that way...

Lead is also useful for bending pipe; it wont collapse if it's full, although bismuth is easier to use, as well as less toxic. It's also great for casting fixtures to hold irregular parts you want to machine.

The most hazardous thing about using metallic lead is splashing it on you, unless you just like eating lead... which isn't very bioavailable as a pure metal. It is dangerous when in an organic form, however.

If you're boiling it hot enough to form lead vapors, you aren't doing it right. :)

Some people make things and use them, some people only use things other people create; guess which type I am? :D

And it's Dain Brammage; to go with my hemmet, and shouldamapads... (lol)

(old SNL reference) :)
 

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The most hazardous thing about using metallic lead is splashing it on you, unless you just like eating lead... which isn't very bioavailable as a pure metal. It is dangerous when in an organic form, however.
My dad had a job when he was kid where he was to pick up the drops on the floor. They almost always had little drops of condensation on them. He picked up little dime and quarter sixed ones all the time and threw them in the pot, a pop here a pop there. Then he found one about plate size and threw it in. Had a nice round scar/dent on the back of his head where it popped and a nickel sized lead burned into it, almost reaching the spine.
 
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