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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is what happens when you and your car compete at the same level of the food chain. :mad:

They can "mandate" all the ethanol that they want to but if the corn isn't there to make it then they're SOL.

This will be an interesting story to follow.

EPA may slash use of ethanol in gasoline as corn crop wilts
By Paul A. Eisenstein, The Detroit Bureau
October 12, 2012

The EPA may shift corn away from ethanol use to reduce demand on drought-impacted farms.

Only months ago, the EPA was pressing hard to expand the use of ethanol in the nation’s gasoline supply, but in the wake of this summer’s fierce drought, the agency may soon reverse course and actually trim back because of shortages of corn used to produce the renewable fuel.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, an influential Utah Republican, this week urged the EPA to curb ethanol requirements, as have 200 members of the House and the governors of eight corn-producing states. Under a 2007 law signed by former President George W. Bush, 15.2 billion gallons of ethanol would need to be used this year, with the plan to more than double that by 2022.

But the viability of that plan came under sharp inspection when, yesterday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture forecast a sharp decline in farm grain output predicting next year’s global corn stockpiles will [be down] 5.4 percent – to the lowest levels in 39 years. The USDA warned that only 23 percent of American corn crop yields are in “good” or “excellent” shape compared with 70 percent last year.

That sent prices for corn spiraling upward. Hatch and others are hoping that by at least reducing the potential demand for corn stocks for fuel use demand prices may level off – which could, in turn, prevent a spiral driving up overall U.S. inflation rates.

“In the face of corn shortages and escalating prices brought on by wide-spread droughts throughout the United States, I urge you to exercise your waiver authority to modify the corn-ethanol requirements for the Renewable Fuel Standards,” Hatch wrote in a letter to EPA administrator Lisa Jackson.

Ironically, Hatch and others now calling on the EPA to back off on ethanol usage were proponents of the 2007 Energy Independence Securities Act – which was aimed at both reducing dependence upon foreign oil while also propping up American farmers by mandating more use of renewable fuels.

When passed, the EPA was expected to direct 5 billion [gallons] of ethanol into the fuel supply for 2007, but the sliding scale reached 15.2 billion gallons this year. And it will peak at 36 billion gallons by 2022.

The law was designed to assuage skeptics who felt that even during good times on the farm too much corn would be diverted to fuel. By 2022, a full 21 billion gallons of ethanol are to come from so-called cellulosic production. While still in the development stage, new production facilities have turned to a variety of alternatives to corn, ranging from scrap paper to grain chaff that would normally not be used in the food supply.

Ironically, the EPA has been struggling to find ways to meet the mandate since consumer demand for ethanol has lagged expectations – even though subsidies keep the price per gallon below that of regular unleaded gasoline.

The agency has increased the amount of ethanol in use in regular gas. And it last year approved rules that would require the use of such fuel in older vehicles produced before the industry began upgrading their fuel systems to tolerate the use of alcohol-based fuels. Ethanol, like other alcohols, is highly corrosive and makers now use special stainless steel or modified synthetic fuel line and engine components to resist damage. Critics continue to dispute EPA claims that the recent increase in ethanol content will be safe for older cars and other products – from ATVs to chainsaws – that run on gasoline.

While a number of states are joining the call to reduce ethanol usage overall this coming year, including governors of Maryland and Delaware, where major poultry operations could be hard hit by rising costs – not everyone echoes that sentiment.

The Michigan Farm Bureau is opposing the request. Indeed, some farm states are hoping to see corn prices rise in the months ahead to help offset declining yields in their local crops that could put some farmers out of business. A report in the Detroit News noted that Michigan’s five ethanol refineries used 98 million bushels of corn annually – compared to a combined 70 million for livestock, dairy and poultry feed.

The EPA is expected to rule on the ethanol waiver request by early November.

http://bottomline.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/12/14399762-epa-may-slash-use-of-ethanol-in-gasoline-as-corn-crop-wilts?lite
 

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Good! About ****ing time actually! I might actually break 20 mpg around town for once! :tongue:
I right there with you and I have a 3.8 !
 

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heck im switching to e85, the stuff rocks i mean gas here has 10-15 percent ethanoel and my 95 cougar still got 23-24 mpg, u guys should look into how clean it keeps the motor, the stuff rocks for power as ill be out in full foce with mine come november, its and easy way to make power, thats and option ron switch to e85 its like running 112-118 octane race fuel and b urns much cooler
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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I have 2 stations very close
 

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I went to the local car wash and picked up 4 30 gallon soap barrels to stock it at the shop since the closest station is half hour to 45 mins away. Now just need to get the fuel system capacity up to snuff. Then hello cheap race fuel.
 

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Yeap the stuff is amazing on a blown application better than race fuel
 

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My SC loves E-10/15, 18mpg city. My wife's 5.0 sees 22 mpg city

Duh corn prices are going up this year because of the lack of rain and high heat and not fuel demand. Rice and cotton acreage is going down here in AR and being replaced by corn, so the way price can go up with more suppliers is if yield is down, and yield is down due to weather.

If we really want to fix corn prices remove the price floor and ceiling--stop subsidizing/bailing farmers. [RANT] If its so bad to give Wall Street a Golden Parachute why is ok to give Old McDonald one every year. [\Rant]
 

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Yea, we'll look at that as a future mod.

Steve Schrader made 829 RWHP on a 2 valve 4.6 V8 with a Vortech + Nitrous on E85. Amazing car.

He ran 6.46 @ 116 MPH in the 1/8th at Farmington.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNkbFlVeBA4

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dynobVeB9Ig&feature=share&list=ULdynobVeB9Ig
I got to see that car several times while he was building my engine, it's very nice.

http://www.greencar.com/articles/flexing-ford-mustang-muscle-e85-performance-car.php

http://blogs.mustang50magazine.com/6810897/miscellaneous/its-just-a-little-ol-two-valve/

Most recent Time slip (on left) http://shraderperformance.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/9.86-at-147.jpg
 

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E85 rocks.
Don't be hatin.
Check the prices of e-0 that the thieving gas station owners charge.
BG, Ky., 10-02-12.
e-0 regular was $4.099, e-10 was $3.439.
Also the article states ethanol is corrosive, its not to metals.
Its reactive to older fiberglass boat fuel tanks and old rubber fuel lines.
I've been running e85 in my 95 cougar since Nov. 2009.
No fuel system problems.

Also ethanol is imported into south florida from Brazil.
So alot of the story dosen't hold water.
 

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So alot of the story dosen't hold water.
But E-85 does. Hold water, that is, since it is hygroscopic and attracts water. Be careful storing that stuff in humid climates.

E-85 makes more HP and especially more torque than race gas, runs cooler, spools a turbo faster, and you can run much higher compression ratio and boost. It does not detonate, which is not always a good thing since once you get past the point where it should have detonated, it's too late.

The entire fuel system needs to be converted to E-85 compatible - fuel filter, lines, injector o-rings. etc. Fuel pump, lines and injectors have to be able to supply 25-30% more fuel.

Also, they change it to E-70 in the winter for easier starting, which can throw off your tune. Starting tables need modified in the tuning software so the car will start in the winter.

A buddy of mine is an E-85 guru - he adds a couple ounces of Marvel's Mystery oil to each tank, to make up for what it lacks in upper cylinder lubrication. Oil needs to be changed much more often, and certain oils are better than others for E-85.

It's great stuff, but ALL the bases need to be covered to use it safely, and conventional engine maintenance needs to be modified for it. It is definitely a commitment.

Al
 

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That's correct, that's why I was changing in tank fuel hoses, and I've got a special fuel filter also
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I saw this picture and it reminded me of this discussion. :tongue:


SUPERCORN!
My Hero! ...

 

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I saw this picture and it reminded me of this discussion. :tongue:


SUPERCORN!
My Hero! ...

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q253/Rigmeister89/Robs%20Car/Supercorn.jpg[/QUOTE]

I gotta say it - THAT is very corny.....
 

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I'm all for this legislation.
quite frankly, I never understood the purpose of E10 since ethanol, chemically, has less energy density than gasoline...
http://www.science20.com/science_20/energy_density_why_gasoline_here_stay-91403

Therefore, any vehicle will get less MPG running E10 vs. E0. This is just physics. If you end up burning more E10 than E0 to drive the same amount of miles, how does that help the environment?

As a race gas, E85 has all kinds of benefits brought about by its higher resistance to knock. However, why should the public subsidize your racing fuel in the form of mfg subsidies or higher food costs?

I'm all for this legislation. I'd be perfectly happy if this funding went to pay back the national debt instead.
 
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