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Discussion Starter #1
can you use after market lowering springs with stock shocks? if so how difficult of a task is it install the lowering springs??
 

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IMHO - you might want to stop and reconsider. The spring rate of lowering spring is much higher that that of stock springs. They are stiffer. So yes, you can use stock shocks. But the ride qualities go away with the stock springs. If it were me, I would cut a coil from each corner and then see if I needed a stiffer shock to prevent bottoming. I have a 94 with Eibachs and you can drive over a dime and tell if it is heads or tails. I dont think, unless it was for a racing setup of some kind, that I would ever put lowering springs in any T-Bird. Cutting a coil is cheaper and cheaper to reverse if you need to.
 

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I used to have eibachs with car quest shocks(still run the rears), and the ride was great.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
alright well I wouldn't know how to cut the stock springs. and second go hard would it be to take the springs off in general to do either. is the process hard/time consuming? cananyone give it to me in a nutshell??
 

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Cheap but not right

I'm not knocking those that have cut their springs and like the ride,
but I tried it and didn't like it with 1 coil cut off. With stock or Tokico shocks there was to much of a pogo stick effect to me. Buy a set of custom springs and enjoy the drive. JMHO.
 

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cutting springs isn't the most right way to do it. you can do it but it's not going to do your car anygood because the spring rate is lowered and so if you hit a bump it's going to "bog" down even more and your more likely to scrape with those soft springs.

eibachs are a much better way of going about things they help improve handling as well as ride comfort. unlike cutting springs which is just aesthetically pleasing and if anything ruins springs. not trying to knock people that have cut their springs and like it. it's your car do what you want.
 

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cutting springs isn't the most right way to do it. you can do it but it's not going to do your car anygood because the spring rate is lowered and so if you hit a bump it's going to "bog" down even more and your more likely to scrape with those soft springs.

eibachs are a much better way of going about things they help improve handling as well as ride comfort. unlike cutting springs which is just aesthetically pleasing and if anything ruins springs. not trying to knock people that have cut their springs and like it. it's your car do what you want.
Not true. A coil spring is a torsion bar wound in a coil. It twists as it compresses. Cutting it increases the spring rate, makes it stiffer while shorter.

Cutting springs doesn't change the fact that each coil still supports the car. It does result in fewer coils absorbing the travel when hitting bumps and each coil remains just as stiff as before, but because there are fewer, the spring effectively is stiffened in spring rate.

Imagine a spring with 10 full coils, and say it has a spring rate of 300 pounds per inch. That means each individual coil has a rate of 300 pounds per 0.10 inch.
After you cut a coil, it still takes 300 pounds to compress each coil 0.10 inch, only now the spring's rate is 300 pounds per 0.90 inch, or something nearer to 330 pounds per whole inch overall. To reach that 1 inch compression overall though, each individual coil now must compress 0.111 of an inch because there are only 9 of them.

That's a simplistic explanation. There is a formula for it somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
haha thanks guys. how would you go about cutting springs, and also how hard is it to remove them and put them back on??
 

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Not true. A coil spring is a torsion bar wound in a coil. It twists as it compresses. Cutting it increases the spring rate, makes it stiffer while shorter.

Cutting springs doesn't change the fact that each coil still supports the car. It does result in fewer coils absorbing the travel when hitting bumps and each coil remains as still as before, but because there are fewer, the spring effectively is stiffened in spring rate.

Imagine a spring with 10 full coils, and say it has a spring rate of 300 pounds per inch. That means each individual coil has a rate of 300 pounds per 0.10 inch.
After you cut a coil, it still takes 300 pounds to compress each coil 0.10 inch, only now the spring's rate is 300 pounds per 0.90 inch, or something nearer to 330 pounds per whole inch overall. To reach that 1 inch compression overall though, each individual coil now must compress 0.111 of an inch because there are only 9 of them.

That's a simplistic explanation. There is a formula for it somewhere.
oh, my auto shop teacher told us that. he was an alcoholic though. reason he told us that was some kid wanted to lower his car some japanese car can't remember and he asked how to cut the springs so it would be lower then the tech when on a speil of how it lowers the spring rate.
 

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http://forums.tccoa.com/showthread.php?t=120104

link to a post I made just yesterday with a brief, not step by step, pictorial of my installing Eibach springs myself. Might help give you an idea of what's involved, and if you want to do it yourself.
It's about 12 posts down the page.
 

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so is it a bad idea to do lowering springs without any other suspension parts? the tech archive on here says that you need to adjust the toe and chamber or something, but i didn't rely get it.
 

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so is it a bad idea to do lowering springs without any other suspension parts? the tech archive on here says that you need to adjust the toe and chamber or something, but i didn't rely get it.
I replaced damn near everything when I put mine in. That meant letting the springs sit for a year and a half after initially buying them but I wanted to do it right when I did it. Which by the way don't get in a hurry and make mistakes like I did :rolleyes: Yes you do need to get aligned after taking your suspension apart (not sure about just changing springs)
 

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so just out of curiosity what would happen if i just ordered some 1.5" drop springs and put them on the car, with out messing with any of the other suspension parts? how bad would it be if i cut off 2 coils?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thats what i was trying to ask lol. is it ok to just get springs.
 

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yah, theirs always a more expensive, time consuming way of doing everything, but sometimes i just want to know how bad it will be if do it the cheep way lol. lowering my car is worth like 300 bucks and 2 hours to me, id rather leave it alone than spend like a grand on suspension.
 

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so just out of curiosity what would happen if i just ordered some 1.5" drop springs and put them on the car, with out messing with any of the other suspension parts? how bad would it be if i cut off 2 coils?
the 1.5 eibachs are really quite nice springs frankly i like them better then sport springs for a daily driver the car feels better. i also have kyb gr2 shocks on my car and i cant shake my fist at those either. with good shocks and springs you may feel bumps a bit more but the way it handles just for daily driving feels so much better its like a night and day difference.

there's a very curvy road that i love to drive, constant s's like a slalom almost. before it didn't feel good as the car rolled from side to side like a top heavy truck and felt really cumbersome. with the new shocks and springs the car will go through this road at 70 mph and hug it.

eibachs for life. nuff said.
 

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i would recommend that you purchase lowering sproings and the proper shocks. why go through all the hassle to work on your car, and not use the proper parts and techniques.

there may be differing opinions on cutting coils and using shocks that are not valved properly for a lower ride height, but nobody can argue that lowering springs and proper shocks are not the proper way to do this.

here is a link to the tech article on installing shocks and springs:

http://www.tccoa.com/articles/mn12how-to/springs/lowering_springs.htm

its an easy DIY garage project. it was my first tbird project and wasn't my last. save your money and do it right.
 

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thanks. But if your car already has good shocks why change them? are you supposed to get shocks that are 1.5" shorter? and the wright up says you will need an alignment after changing the springs and shocks. Never herd of that with any other cars, but then again i know nothing about alignment.
 

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because shocks have valves in them that are designed to work within a specified range of travel. if you lower the car and change that travel distance, they will no longer dampen the suspension like they are supposed to. it might even make it handle worse.

i bought new monroe shocks when i first lowered my car and the front end bounced like a junk yard reject. it was almost dangerous at highway speeds.

i had to redo the fronts with a shock that is properly valved for the lowered ride height. i think the rears are less susceptible to this issue.

you'll know during the test drive if you've gambled and gotten the wrong shocks.

i bought suspension techniques lowering springs from JC whitney and i remember them being very affordable.
 

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because shocks have valves in them that are designed to work within a specified range of travel. if you lower the car and change that travel distance, they will no longer dampen the suspension like they are supposed to. it might even make it handle worse.

i bought new monroe shocks when i first lowered my car and the front end bounced like a junk yard reject. it was almost dangerous at highway speeds.

i had to redo the fronts with a shock that is properly valved for the lowered ride height. i think the rears are less susceptible to this issue.

you'll know during the test drive if you've gambled and gotten the wrong shocks.

i bought suspension techniques lowering springs from JC whitney and i remember them being very affordable.
Monore shocks specifically say they are for a zero drop on rockauto. Sensatracs especially have valving for a comfort zone (normal height) and a control zone to soften out bumps. When you lower the car you are probably riding in that soft zone.

Stock is probably similar too...they are definately made by Monroe, the engravings match to a monroe matic shock. Its best to get a shock designed for lowering.

If you want to see a video on exactly how a shock is made...

http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science-channel/14378-how-its-made-shock-absorber-video.htm
 
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