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Discussion Starter #1
Okay guys, im sick of my car being a one wheel wonder. I was wondering what the project is to make my car have a lsd or posy. Im wondering:

1. How much?
2. Hours of work?
3. Make a difference?

I am aiming to get the bird into the 14's by next spring. And in order for me to do <u><b>ANY</u></b> power adders i need to have a stronger back end. So i was wondering.

Andrew Z
 

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1. Depends on exactly what you want I would think you want to change gears as well.
2. to just swap the differential for most people about 3-4, takes me about an hour. If you are talking about building the differential you better have A week to work on it.
3. definately
 

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Posi-Traction=differential one would purchase for thier 10 bolt 8.5 GENERAL MOTORS vehicle.

Traction Lok=differential one would purchase for an 8.8 rear end FORD.
 

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Ok, whats the difference between tack - lock and LSD? Also ware does conventional and open and full floating fit in. Sorry to jack but I would realy like to know
 

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Trak-Loc and LSD perform the same function. The difference is in the marketing name.

Edit: Oh, conventional and open rear ends are the same thing, and that means they do not have Trak-Loc/LSD/Posi. As far as I know full floating rear ends are generally reserved for heavy duty applications (off-road vehicles, trucks, etc.). Someone else might be able to provide more insight into that.
 

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Full-float and semi-float usually pertain only to solid axle designs. Fully floating means that the wheel hub/bearing is separate from the axle shaft itself, and attached directly to the axle housing. None of the rig's weight is handled by the axle shaft, just the torque from the differential.

Semi-floating means that the wheel mounts directly to the axle shaft, and the shaft rides on a bearing. The shaft is usually either retained by a C-clip at the differential, or a bolted retainer at the outside of the wheel bearing (like the 9"). Heavy duty applications like 3/4 and 1-ton trucks usually get full-floating axles due to their better weight-handling capabilities. Semi-floaters that use a C-clip have the nasty habit of letting the wheel walk away when an axle shaft breaks, whereas ones with a pressed-on bearing and retainer plate will at least keep things mostly together as you coast to the side of the trail/road/track.
 
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