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Discussion Starter #1
Last fall I did a remote battery install on my 95 Thunderbird. I now have the problem where the starter will stay engaged for about 3 seconds after I let off the key.

I mounted the battery and a remote mounted kill switch in the corner of my trunk. I have a remote starter solenoid from Painless Performance mounted to the battery box. I took the key signal wire that was located next to the original battery location and ran it back to the new solenoid in the trunk. From the trunk solenoid I ran a starter cable directly to the starter and put a small jumper wire from the power at the starter to the solenoid on the starter itself. This way the starter will automatically engage when power is given to it.

I believe that the starter itself is not the problem. The starter was 1 year old with about 25 starts on it and it only started staying over engaged immediately after I rewired everything for the battery.

The rest of the cable routing involves the alternator wire going directly from the alternator back to the battery side of the kill switch. The primary power running from the kill switch to the heavy fuses next to the overflow tank. And the ground being welded to a stud in the trunk as well as being direct wired to the dedicated negative leads that ran to the battery when it was mounted under the hood.

Any ideas on what I should be checking to see why the starter is hanging like this? Thanks.
 

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Not sure if I correctly understand your wiring. Could you post a diagram? So far, it sounds to me like a failing solenoid...
 

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Why the remote solenoid? You could wire the remote battery and keep the trigger at the starter. I was reading something about the flexplate spinning the starter (creating electricity) and the factory system has a diode to prevent 'back-charging' the system to prevent this.

THIS thread is what I was reading. Posts #4 and #14.

EDIT:
Read THIS also.

Why does my starter seem to "run on" after the switch is released?



This is a common complaint on Ford permanent magnet starters, although it can occur on any permanent magnet starter in the right conditions. This situation develops when the ignition terminal on the starter is "jumpered" to the battery terminal on the starter and a remote solenoid is used. Permanent magnet starters can actually produce power if they are driven from an outside source (i.e. the starter will act like an alternator once the engine fires and starts spinning). The current produced in the starter for this second or so will flow from the starter's battery terminal to the starters ignition terminal and hold the solenoid in. This will cause the one to two second delay in the solenoid release and an irritating noise. The solution is to wire the starter per the instruction sheet, which will ensure that the ignition switch terminal goes dead the instance the key is released.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I chose to put the solenoid in the trunk so that I did not have a cable that was un-fused and always hot running through the car. The wire that is coming from the alternator and the main power wire are both running through 175 amp mega-fuses located in the trunk. I wanted to be able to run an un-fused wire to the starter. That's my reason for the new solenoid.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will first check to make sure my remote solenoid is closing when the key is turned off. If it is, I will continue the signal wire that runs the trunk solenoid to the solenoid on the starter.
 

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The Parts Guy
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From the trunk solenoid I ran a starter cable directly to the starter and put a small jumper wire from the power at the starter to the solenoid on the starter itself. This way the starter will automatically engage when power is given to it.
Remove that jumper.


I took the key signal wire that was located next to the original battery location and ran it back to the new solenoid in the trunk.
Split that circuit to provide the signal to both solenoids.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just to wrap this up- I ended up doing just what racecougar recommended and my problem was fixed.

Thanks, racecougar.
 
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