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I will be replacing both rear hubs and bearings, but I can't find anyplace that sells the rear axle spindle nut.
Does anyone know of a source for this part? I understand that you shouldn't re-use the old one, and I'm worried if I can't find new ones.
 

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Ford Parts Giant or any parts store.

Do not buy the dorman ones; I use these in the front too.

FOSZ-4B477-A
 

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Discussion Starter #5
https://www.fordpartsgiant.com/parts/ford-retainer-grease_fosz-4b477-a.html?Make=Lincoln&Model=Mark+VIII&Year=1998&Submodel=&Filter=(e=8-cyl-4-6l;t=4at-4r70w)

Newer part is https://www.fordpartsgiant.com/parts/ford-nut-adjusting-screw_-w707772-s441.html

FPG shows stock.


This is the original.




This is the updated part, a nylock version.



This is the dorman part; it will **** up your axles, do not use this one.
Is tis the rear axle spindle nut? The FPG description doesn't say that.
I know about the Dorman being garbage.
Thanks!
 

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I've always reused the original nuts, and have never had a problem. Only time I won't reuse them is if they are heavily rusted, cause that will affect the locking function of them if all the plates are rusted together. The new style though, those definitely would be one time use.
 

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I've reused the originals as well; they are three thin nuts in a cage, and they have slightly different threads.

Removing them carves on the axle a bit, but they still carve on it a bit the second time. I replaced the axles the third time I did the bearings on that car, they had 330k miles on them, lol. I bought new nuts when I replaced the axles.

The nylock version cuts threads in the nylon, and you want to replace them if you remove them, as the grooves are there already, and won't retain ****.

The Dorman parts are mechanically deformed, as you can see in the pic, and cut the hell out of the axle going in and out. **** that.

The important thing of putting these on, it to turn the wheel as you're tightening, to seat everything.

Tighten, turn, tighten, turn... You'll notice it loosens up when you turn the wheel.

Once it quits loosening up, stand on a long breaker bar to get the right torque; it's higher than any torque wrench you'll have.

Once you can't get the bar to move standing on the bar, it's good. :)

You likely cannot over torque this, unless you weigh 500lbs.
You're pulling the steel inner races together, and they're 3/16" thick or better.

The SET49 bearings from Timken are "Opposed Tapered Roller Bearings", cheap knockoffs are spherical rollers, and won't last for ****.
You can get these from anyone, really. They have been used for this for 40 years or so.
RA has them fairly cheap; get Timken bearings.

https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=1117862&jsn=1026
 

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I use the old nuts and double them up, using the second as a lock nut. Also use Timken SET49 bearings.
 

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These axle nuts are the same on all four corners, right?
Stock, no; but I use these on all 4 corners.

The OEM front ones are more like the Dorman ones; they really carve up the spindles.
 

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You can increase the torque value by adding length to the torque wrench. 1 foot extension supposedly will double the torque.
 

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You can increase the torque value by adding length to the torque wrench. 1 foot extension supposedly will double the torque.
Not true at all. That will give you more leverage to apply the torque, but the torque wrench measures the torque at the head, which will still be the amount of twisting force on the bolt.
 

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Yes, don't apply 200 ft pounds of torque to a 100 ft pound torque wrench; if you do that, the wrench will read wrong from then on.


I use a "breaker bar" on those bolts, and stand on it, as a cheap version of a torque wrench that goes to 250lbs, lol.

You might break the axle if you extend it much and do that, the big thing with those nuts is to keep turning them until they quit loosening up.

You're pulling the two sections of a tapered roller bearing together, and it won't hold torque until the two inner sections are together, tight.
Nothe the line on the inside of the bearing?



Bearing SET49 (Timken) | Size and Specification | Bearings Online Catalogue

https://www.applied.com/c-brands/c-qmi/c-timken-co-/set49/Tapered-Roller-Bearing-Cone-Cup-Set/p/101709236



Get that pulled together tight, Then you can apply the torque to it.

The bearings get set into position while you're tightening and turning them; you'll notice when they get together.


There are cheap wheel bearings on ebay and amazon, that are not correct; they are not tapered rollers, but standard ball bearings:



This will go to crap quickly; it has no support from side to side,as a tapered roller does.
 
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