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So I guess it is about money and not emissions.

Sniffer is the only real way to check emissions let the OBD-II port report what the computer says is happening does not confirm what is going out the tailpipe.
 

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So I guess it is about money and not emissions.

Sniffer is the only real way to check emissions let the OBD-II port report what the computer says is happening does not confirm what is going out the tailpipe.
EVERYTHING the government does is about money, not clean air, not safety, just money. Be it local, state, or federal, it's all money.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
NJ does not charge for smog check. You pull into a state run facility and they do it for free. This is part of the changes they've made, new cars for example you get 5 years of both reg and inspection. 1999 they went to bi-yearly, and a few years ago pre 1996 diesels were exempted. NJ is in a EPA smog check requirement area.
 

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EVERYTHING the government does is about money, not clean air, not safety, just money. Be it local, state, or federal, it's all money.
If that was true, then why do some states have no inspection for cars 35 years or older? NC made that change a few years ago. $13 from every classic car would add up.

Al
 

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If that was true, then why do some states have no inspection for cars 35 years or older? NC made that change a few years ago. $13 from every classic car would add up.

Al
Because it adds too much complexity to the testing.
Not sure when the law was passed, and what all is inspected in your inspections, but most cars that are that old are no longer daily drivers, and are instead project cars or used only for recreation. On a regular basis, how many cars from 1981 and prior do you see on your daily commute? Plus, since they don't have the ports to plug in the computers that do most of the work, telling you about the O2 sensors, etc, they just simplify it to the cars that are predominant on the road.

The state gets their money off those cars in gas taxes, custom and collector plate fees, etc.

That said, I have no doubt that there are good intentions behind most of the laws passed, but ultimately all they are is money generators for the state based on arbitrary things. Did you know back when the federal 55mph limit was enacted that many states had policies where there were no fines for highway speeds up to 10mph over the posted limit? The illusion was that 55mph was a fuel saving speed, and that it was "safer". Safety is a hard thing to judge, I know people who can't drive at 55 because they don't pay proper attention, and I know people who are capable of determining the correct speed for both their economy and their safety by driving as the conditions permit. I've lived in Houston, TX where the majority of traffic on I-45 during rush hour moves at 90mph, and if you're not doing 90, you're in the right most lane exiting. It wasn't a big deal, I didn't see huge accidents, and it worked. I've had some cars that get their best MPG at around 60, some that got it at 75, and my 2002 Crown Vic with 2.78:1 rear gears got it's best at 85. My 74 Trans Am went from 4mpg at 60 to 9 at 120.

I am not championing ignoring laws, nor saying that there is no purpose to speed limits. But, the primary use of speed limits is as a money generator.
 

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Because it adds too much complexity to the testing.
Not sure when the law was passed, and what all is inspected in your inspections, but most cars that are that old are no longer daily drivers, and are instead project cars or used only for recreation. On a regular basis, how many cars from 1981 and prior do you see on your daily commute? Plus, since they don't have the ports to plug in the computers that do most of the work, telling you about the O2 sensors, etc, they just simplify it to the cars that are predominant on the road.
Doesn't matter if you see the cars every day, they could still make money off them, and have safer cars on the road.

We do have a standard inspection for 1981-1995 cars, no emissions test, $13.

Al
 

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I think the training and expertise required for state licensed inspectors to know every nuance and detail of every 35+ year old car that comes in for inspection would negate the profits of it. Cars made in the last 20 years are basically homogeneous in terms of what to look for, how to test, ect. 35+ years ago though things varied quite a bit, especially between foreign cars, not to mention obsolete wear items replaced by aftermarket that won't necessarily coincide with their reference books. They going to make you fix something that actually improved the car's safety because it doesn't match their diagram?
 

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Here in Massachusetts, all cars get a safety inspection every year. Any thing less than 15 years old get emission tested also through the OBD port.

Joe
 

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Sniffer is not real complex, set a upper limit and be done with it, disregard displacement. If you fail you buy an exemption, or it becomes a off-road vehicle. Similar or how it was done in Atlanta, if you spend over $400 (parts and labor) in repairs you get a bye or you buy and exemption sticker.
 

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Other states trying to follow the California model and try and split it to make their citizens happy at the same time


Anyway, here in California, cars 2000 and newer just get a test through the ODB-II port, while cars from 1978 (I believe) to 1999 and older get the sniffer test with OBD-I / OBD-II port scan. Cars older than the 1978 just pay the "classic car" tags and they're done.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sniffer is not real complex, set a upper limit and be done with it, disregard displacement. If you fail you buy an exemption, or it becomes a off-road vehicle. Similar or how it was done in Atlanta, if you spend over $400 (parts and labor) in repairs you get a bye or you buy and exemption sticker.
In New Jersey if you failed inspection....you had to the end of the next month after it failed to pass, fail april 1st, you get until the final day of may to fix it. Fail to fix, you will not be allowed to legally drive the car until it is fixed. you have to get it fixed at a certified clean air facility. Any 25+ year old car can get Historic Plates. Historic plates limit you to under 3k a year. Odometer checked.
 

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In New Jersey if you failed inspection....you had to the end of the next month after it failed to pass, fail april 1st, you get until the final day of may to fix it. Fail to fix, you will not be allowed to legally drive the car until it is fixed. you have to get it fixed at a certified clean air facility. Any 25+ year old car can get Historic Plates. Historic plates limit you to under 3k a year. Odometer checked.

A toggle switch is very easy to wire inline to the odo drive motor :zwall:
 

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NJ does not charge for smog check. You pull into a state run facility and they do it for free. This is part of the changes they've made, new cars for example you get 5 years of both reg and inspection. 1999 they went to bi-yearly, and a few years ago pre 1996 diesels were exempted. NJ is in a EPA smog check requirement area.
The Fee for inspections is part of the registration cost and that was when they checked everything!
But the registration cost rises and the inspections are less and less entailed.

Whats funny about that is I learned that info wile taking the corse to get my ERT#. Emissions Repair Technician!
 

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In New Jersey if you failed inspection....you had to the end of the next month after it failed to pass, fail april 1st, you get until the final day of may to fix it. Fail to fix, you will not be allowed to legally drive the car until it is fixed. you have to get it fixed at a certified clean air facility. Any 25+ year old car can get Historic Plates. Historic plates limit you to under 3k a year. Odometer checked.
Only collector car status limits milage to 3k a year (they give you a weird triangle sticker to prove odometer is checked every year), Historic tags don't limit milage but your historic insurance might. I had Hagerty insurance and they didn't limit milage.

Also Historic plates are a one time fee of $44.00 and all you do is send the renewal card back every 3 years for your new registration
 

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I think the training and expertise required for state licensed inspectors to know every nuance and detail of every 35+ year old car that comes in for inspection would negate the profits of it.
Not many nuances to checking for working horn, lights, wipers, turn signals, brake lights, etc. That's all a safety inspection is around here.

In PA, they pull two diagonal wheels and check the brakes, check the suspension, cannot have any holes in the body, etc. Very strict.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Only collector car status limits milage to 3k a year (they give you a weird triangle sticker to prove odometer is checked every year), Historic tags don't limit milage but your historic insurance might. I had Hagerty insurance and they didn't limit milage.

Also Historic plates are a one time fee of $44.00 and all you do is send the renewal card back every 3 years for your new registration
I have a friend who tried to abuse the system, and he got caught commuting to work in 2010 with a 25 year old Buick that had a rotted out floor. Cop told him 3k a year, no daily use.
 

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Not many nuances to checking for working horn, lights, wipers, turn signals, brake lights, etc. That's all a safety inspection is around here.

In PA, they pull two diagonal wheels and check the brakes, check the suspension, cannot have any holes in the body, etc. Very strict.

Al
Luckily I don't live in a state with it so I don't know the depth of it. I was more referring to inspection involving emissions devices and suspension, and verifying their functionality and legitimacy. That stuff would definitely take some knowledge for the individual conducting the test with cars that old.

Quite frankly paying $13 for a stooge just to verify if my lights and wipers are working would infuriate me. I may not like it but at least earn it. :tongue:
 
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