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I am writing a term paper on the MN12 that is due on Thursday and I need your input about what I wrote. Don't worry about grammer and english, i am going to go over it later. Maybe any topics I didn;t hit on, or incorrect information. THANKS

Here it goes......

MN12 is an abbreviation for “Midsize North America Project #12.” Essentially it is the name given to the body styles that all Thunderbirds and Cougars shared that were produced between the years 1989 to 1997. Both cars were given rear wheel drive and independent rear suspension (IRS). For ease of referencing, I will be comparing the 1997 Thunderbird to other cars.

When the Thunderbird was first introduced in its MN12 body style in 1989, its purpose was to replace the old Turbo Coupe. The cars performance is not pretty impressive for the first couple of years when the new body style came out. The base model rolled off the production line with a 140 hp 3.8 Liter V6 engine. The Super Coupe version of the car was able to produce 210 hp. This was the first year in the Thunderbirds history when a V8 engine was not offered. Instead of a V8 engine, the Super Coupes came with a supercharged engine was very unreliable and most cars owners wanted. In 1989 122,900 cars were sold with the new Thunderbird body style.

In 1992 the car was given a V8 engine which enabled the car to produce 200 hp, 60 more horsepower than the standard V6 engine. In 1993, the car was given a slight facelift but major changes to the design didn’t come until 1994. Interestingly enough, in 1993 the Thunderbird reached its peak production selling over 130,000 cars even though this year wasn’t a big change from last year. In 94, the car was given a different nose, hood, and headlights. But most importantly, the old 5.0 L V8 was replaced with a more efficient 4.6 L V8 producing the same amount of power. Another major change was that the entire interior of the car was redesigned.
For the 94 Thunderbird the designers from Ford decided to wrap the controls of the car around the driver so it resembled an airplane cockpit. Now all of the controls wrap around the driver, and the center console becomes much more driver friendly. The gauge cluster was also updated as well as a less blocky looking interior. The Ford designers also threw in some much needed creature comforts such as a power driver’s seat and an optional premium sound system.

Sadly, in 1995 the Super Coupe was discontinued. This SC version of the car was able to produce 230 hp from a supercharged 3.8 Liter V6 engine. I believe that most people didn’t buy the Super Coupe for its performance since the V8 could almost put out just as much power. Rather people purchased the Super Coupe for the way it looked. All Super Coupes were given ground effects, electronic ride control and special SC rims. The electronic ride control allows the driver to control the way the car handles from a firm ride to a soft ride. The car also had a slightly modified interior such as a primitive heads up display with displayed oil levels and coolant temperatures. This heads up display was standard in the SC but was an option on the base model. The SC was also given a hand e-brake instead of the standard foot pedal.
The T-Birds in 1996 and 1997 were given a more angled hood to allow for more air ventilation in the engine compartment. The headlights were also redesigned due to the fact that headlights previous to this became easily yellowed from the elements. Along with being made from a different material, the headlights were angled in more to give a sportier look. The car was also given a different intake manifold to increase performance. When the MN12 body style was discontinued in 1997, the V8 engine produced 65 more horsepower then when the first MN12’s rolled off the production floor. Sadly only 75,000 Thunderbirds were sold in 1997, that’s 50,000 cars less than when the new body style came out in 1989.

The Thunderbird is still a great car due to its low cost compared to other sport cars. The last year the Thunderbird was produced it was able to push out 205 hp and 280 ft. lbs. of torque out of a 16 valve SOHC V8 engine. New sports cars such as the Honda S2000 can only produce 153 ft. lbs. of torque and 240 hp out of a VTEC engine. The S2000 also costs $10,000 more than a Thunderbird, while only being a second faster in the ¼ mile.

Even though the Thunderbird was put back into production in 2002, most MN12 owners felt that 97 was the last year for the car. Still, the car was put back into production with a completely different body style. The new retro Thunderbird has a 3.9 Liter 280 hp V8 engine, with 286 ft. pounds of torque. The retro Thunderbird shares styling of the 1960’s Thunderbirds mixed with a sporty new look, while sharing no characteristics with the MN12 body style.

The MN12 body style was designed to be big and sporty while still remaining a 2 door coupe. Neither the MN12’s came in a convertible version they were only sold having a hard top. The exterior of the car features a length of 200 inches and a width of 72 inches. The car is pretty low to the ground being only 52 inches high, and having a ground clearance of 5.4 inches. One major downfall is the weight of the MN12. A stock T-Bird weighs in at 3,700 lbs, which is much heavier than most other coupes. A stock S2000 weighs in at only 2700 lbs, that being 1000 lbs. less than a stock Thunderbird.

Taking off this extra weight from the car is the cheapest way to make it faster. But most people don’t want to take out their seats, and sound deadening material so they have to find a more reasonable way of making their car faster. Many people choose to add a racing chip to their car. A chip runs around $250 and can only give a 20 hp increase but the results are more impressive on the track. On the ¼ mile, most people are able to shave off a whole second, mainly due to change in shift points and removal of the rev limiter. Most people think that this chip would harm the engine but it fact actually helps the engine.

Ford decided that its consumers would rather have a smoother acceleration rather than a higher performance. To insure a smooth ride Ford increased the time the car takes to shift so you wouldn’t have a hard shift. So during hard acceleration the stock chip actually tells the car to let go of the throttle so the passengers wouldn’t be jerked during shifting. But the smoother the shift the more stress it puts on the transmission. By installing a chip it allows the car to have slightly harder shifts, so the car can accelerate quicker and it can also increase the longevity of the transmission.

Another route to go is with a Supercharger. The Supercharger can cram more air into the engine therefore increasing the power of the engine by about 80 horsepower. The Superchargers usually run $5,000 with installation. A Supercharger can bring a V8 engine’s hp to 280. A more economical way to improve your car is by running a nitrous setup. A N02 shot can give you an additional 85 horsepower for around $1,000. This is a much cheaper route to go but some MN12 owners consider it cheating because it is not a traditional way of getting more power from the engine.

Some people decide to put a whole new engine into their car. Most people drop a Cobra engine into their car which can push out as much as 290 horsepower. Other people decide to upgrade their current engine, such as porting the heads or changing the heads all together. Turbo charging the engine can create some serious power, but the car needs to be heavily modified in order to fit a turbo and it turns out that the turbo option is not very cost effective.
Coy Miller is a well respected Thunderbird owner. His SC is able to run the ¼ mile in 11 ½ seconds with full production weight. The only difference between his engine and other SC engine owners is that he completely rebuilt his engine, along with adding a specially designed Supercharger. While most SC’s are able to run the ¼ mile in under 15 seconds.

Different people choose different reasons to purchase the MN12, most people chose it because it has “Mark VIII Luxury and Mustang Performance for Under $22,000” (Edmunds.com). Even though the car had a rocky start when it came out in the new body style, it became an instant success. The cockpit style interior makes it a joy to ride in and the history of the Thunderbird is what made the MN12 a legend.

.................I am putting in pictures later to make it more interesting
:D
 

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Motorboatin' SOB, Headlight Cleaning Guru
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Carlover007 said:
In 1993, the car was given a slight facelift but major changes to the design didn’t come until 1994.
what about the facelift? you referring to the front bumper? i think the 89-90 and 91-93 bumpers were different. maybe its 89-91 and 92-93, i dont remember.
 

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Cougar Pilot
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"Essentially it is the name given to the body styles that all Thunderbirds and Cougars shared that were produced between the years 1989 to 1997. "

It is the chassis code for the 1989-1997 Ford Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar.

"The cars performance is not pretty impressive for the first couple of years when the new body style came out."

Not very impressive? 210 hp 315 ft/lbs?

The base model rolled off the production line with a 140 hp 3.8 Liter V6 engine. The Super Coupe version of the car was able to produce 210 hp. This was the first year in the Thunderbirds history when a V8 engine was not offered. Instead of a V8 engine, the Super Coupes came with a supercharged engine was very unreliable and most cars owners wanted. In 1989 122,900 cars were sold with the new Thunderbird body style.

Could mention that the LX/Base only had 140 hp. Should also mention that the SC had a blown 3.8L V-6. It wasn't very unreliable either.

"In 1992 the car was given a V8 engine which enabled the car to produce 200 hp, 60 more horsepower than the standard V6 engine."

Wrong. 1991.

"the old 5.0 L V8 was replaced with a more efficient 4.6 L V8 producing the same amount of power."

4.6L has 5 more horsepower and 10 or 20 less ft/lbs of torque

"The gauge cluster was also updated"

From a '93? I don't think so.


"believe that most people didn’t buy the Super Coupe for its performance since the V8 could almost put out just as much power"

No, the torque isn't even close. I bet alot of SC's were sold because they offered a manual trans.

"The car was also given a different intake manifold to increase performance. When the MN12 body style was discontinued in 1997, the V8 engine produced 65 more horsepower then when the first MN12’s rolled off the production floor."

The N/A V-6's that is...

"On the ¼ mile, most people are able to shave off a whole second, mainly due to change in shift points and removal of the rev limiter."

Really? I must have a 14 second car then. Sweet.

"A N02 shot"

N2O

"around $1,000."

Shouldn't be that much

"some MN12 owners consider it cheating because it is not a traditional way of getting more power from the engine."

It's traditional now, and some [insert any car here] drivers think it's cheating.

"Most people drop a Cobra engine into their car which can push out as much as 290 horsepower."

Hmm probably most people do the PI swap. And the Cobra makes 300 or 305. The Mark VIII makes 280-290.

What about the 1989 Motor Trend Car of the Year award?

#1 Ford T-Bird SC
#2 Mercury Cougar XR-7
 

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Well I think BlackCat covered the technical issues,

"Coy Miller is a well respected Thunderbird owner."
I'd rephrase this as it just seems out of the blue. "A well respected Thunderbird owner, Coy Miller, ...." sounds more correct.

I don't know if it's too late to revise, but you might want to drop, or at least explain some of the more technical things. I don't know what class this is for, but your typical english teacher won't know what the devil "runs the 1/4 mile" means, or "porting the heads" is. If you have a picky teacher they'll probably take some points off for straying from the topic or being unclear.

Take a look at your paragraphs. They are good themselves, they just appear to be out of order in some places. As a general rule you should probably keep it chronological, wrap up all talk of 97 birds by the time you talk about the 02 models, etc.

And incase you miss it when you go over it for grammar, never use the "I" in an essay. You used it in the first paragraph :D

Good luck! I wish I could've done a paper on Tbirds but I had unflexible teachers. :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guy soo much, you really saved my a$$ this time. :thumbsup:
 

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TCCoA Bachelor Club Pres.
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You guys sure there was no V8, I thought only the cougar didn't get a V8, I thought the T-bird had all 3?
 

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Sheepish
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89-90 only 3.8s are available. no V8s.

91-93 the 5.0 V8 was available from both Ford and Mercury

94-97 the 4.6 V8 was available from both Ford and Mercury

the SC 3.8 was available from 89-95, but it slightly changed in 94 from previous years.
 

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92CougLS said:
You guys sure there was no V8, I thought only the cougar didn't get a V8, I thought the T-bird had all 3?
tbird
89/90 - 3.8l na, 3.8l sc
91-93 - 3.8l na, 3.8l sc, 5.0l
94/95 - 3.8l na, 3.8l sc, 4.6l
96/97 - 3.8l na, 4.6l

cougar
89/90 - 3.8l na, 3.8lsc
91-93 - 3.8l na, 5.0l
94-97 - 3.8l na, 4.6l
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Technically, why do most car owners consider N20 cheating???
 

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Cougar Pilot
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A. It comes in a bottle
B. Runs out, needs refilling
C. Used by ricers everywhere
D. Doesn't take much skill to install in most cases
 

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Sheepish
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Carlover007 said:
Technically, why do most car owners consider N20 cheating???
Because its a chemical method of adding oxygen to the combustion process and adds more oxygen than the engine and ingest on its own.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
K cool, I changed all that stuff on my essay but im still trying to come up with a good introduction. Thanks again.
 

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BlackCat94 said:
D. Doesn't take much skill to install in most cases
Yeah, and then you blow up airboxes after 'installing' it. ;)
 

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ShadowDragon said:


Yeah, and then you blow up airboxes after 'installing' it. ;)
yea, then you learn how to do it right, and reinstall it......


doh
 

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Sheepish
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JoelBender said:


yea, then you learn how to do it right, and reinstall it......


doh
And keep a spare intake while you learn how to use it. :tongue:
 
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