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Discussion Starter #1
...I have a question - after I add 1/3 can to the intake via the power brake booster vacuum line, do I add enough to stall the engine or do I just shut it off?

Also, do I need to change the oil after I add 1/3 to the crank case?

Thanks,

Dennis
 

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You should add just enough to where it sucks the seafoam through, but don't let it die until you have added the 1/3 of the can or it may be a pain in the ass later on when you try to start it.
 

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Slowly slurp it up - don't stall it out - then shut off the engine immediately after it's been ingested fully. And yes, make sure to change your oil within a few days if you add it to the crankcase.
 

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instead of sea foam you can use water does the exact same at a fraction of the cost

get yourself a 20oz bottle of cold spring water and hook up a very small vac line to it maybe 1/8" tops it'll clean the engine does the same thing as a blown head gasket where the coolant 'steam cleans' the cylinders.
 

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...water + engine = bad????
 

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instead of sea foam you can use water does the exact same at a fraction of the cost

get yourself a 20oz bottle of cold spring water and hook up a very small vac line to it maybe 1/8" tops it'll clean the engine does the same thing as a blown head gasket where the coolant 'steam cleans' the cylinders.
That was an old carbureted trick, keep em revvin and slowly pour a cup of water thru the carb, used to clean the carbon out.:)
 

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instead of sea foam you can use water does the exact same at a fraction of the cost

get yourself a 20oz bottle of cold spring water and hook up a very small vac line to it maybe 1/8" tops it'll clean the engine does the same thing as a blown head gasket where the coolant 'steam cleans' the cylinders.
I'm skeptical. TOO skeptical. After reading about Maic's hydrolocked engine, I don't need to be told twice that ANY water other than the vapor existing in the air is bad for an engine.

I'll only add water to an engine after I see a dozen or so other people do it in front of me, then drive their cars for a few thousand miles and come back to me and prove that their engines are in perfect condition.

I'll stick to the tried and true methods that I can trust. Sea Foam can be had for about $6 a can at my local Home Depot. Cheap enough for me, and I don't have to worry about it.

If you pour water down your cylinders and it works, more power to ya'. I just wouldn't go about telling people to do it to their engines - too many factors are involved; any of which can go out of whack and destroy an engine. Too much too fast, even by accident, WHAM! ... I just wouldn't want that on my conscience had I suggested it in the first place.
 

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Yep, Seafoam is so much safer than water...since it compresses and all. :rolleyes:

Any non-compressible liquid, Seafoam included, will hydrolock an engine if it's introduced at a fast enough rate. People were using water to remove carbon long before Seafoam existed. Just don't go pouring water into your crankcase or fuel tank. ;)
 

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The old WWII fighters even had a "water injection" system that sprayed a mist of H2O into the intakes to cool things off and add power in "emergencies"... Of course they were running with huge V12 engines, with HUGE blowers..

"Piston engines in military aircraft utilized water injection technology prior to World War II in order to increase takeoff power. This was used so that heavily-laden fighters could take off from shorter runways, climb faster, and quickly reach high altitudes to intercept enemy bomber formations." - Wikipedia

(looked it up to be sure... ;) )
 

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As an airplane nut, I'll explain further....

While called water injection... it's actually water/methanol injection. The throttle setting was called War Emergency Power.

The pilot had to break a piece of safety wire across the throttle gate. The W/M injection was sprayed into the intake manifold to reduce intake temperatures and allow higher manifold pressure and to forestall detonation.

Aircraft fuel in the 40's had in today's octane, a rating of about 130-150!

A P-51 Mustang at takeoff pulled about 55-60 inches of manifold pressure (your normal 200 hp Cessna nowadays pulls about 28-30 inches at full throttle)

When the pilot "Broke the wire" the W/M injection allowed up to about 70 inches of Manifold pressure. It was time limited to about 5 minutes because much more than that and the engine's would come apart.

WEP was not used for takeoff or other things except for emergencies. Like five FW-190's on your tail!

If a pilot used WEP on a mission, the engine needed to be inspected and he had to explain to the maintenance officer why he was abusing his plane. Having a few bullet holes in it usually helped the pilots argument.

Warbirds flown today are power limited due to the fuel. Aviation gasoline is maxed out at 100 octane which limits the manifold pressure these planes can pull. Usually limited to about 45 inches. So in reality, they are flying around at about 75% power.


Hope that clears things up a tad...


Brian
 

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:bangwall: Yeah, I know about the WEP thing; I'm a bit of a plane nut myself too. And the fact that Seafoam isn't compressible... I guess it's not as terrible as I once thought now that I put all the pieces together. But I still think I'm going to stick with Seafoam. :)
 

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At least Sea Foam is combustable though.
 

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I'm skeptical. TOO skeptical. After reading about Maic's hydrolocked engine, I don't need to be told twice that ANY water other than the vapor existing in the air is bad for an engine.

I'll only add water to an engine after I see a dozen or so other people do it in front of me, then drive their cars for a few thousand miles and come back to me and prove that their engines are in perfect condition.

I'll stick to the tried and true methods that I can trust. Sea Foam can be had for about $6 a can at my local Home Depot. Cheap enough for me, and I don't have to worry about it.

If you pour water down your cylinders and it works, more power to ya'. I just wouldn't go about telling people to do it to their engines - too many factors are involved; any of which can go out of whack and destroy an engine. Too much too fast, even by accident, WHAM! ... I just wouldn't want that on my conscience had I suggested it in the first place.

where are you? I don't think my local HD carries this stuff.
 

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Home depot doesn't sell automotive fluids...
 

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Home depot doesn't sell automotive fluids...
At the Home Depot store I work at, we have a bunch of stuff in the Lawn and Garden center. It's on the second or third end cap down across from the garden tools (shovels, rakes, etc.). I can scan my receipt with the Sea Foam on it that I just bought today if you like; $6.49+ tax, 16 oz. can. We also carry Armor-All products, polishes, waxes, cleaning items, and various types of motor oils - in addition to the oils and additives for gasoline you might need with small engines and lawn tractors.
 

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yup. Seen it at HD meself. I was suprised to see it there. I have used both water (decades ago) and sea foam. The sea foam sure makes A LOT more smoke. Was actually fun to make all that smoke.
 

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When I sea foamed my engine I stalled it after the the 1/3 mark. I guess it is supposed to leave a little bit of sea foam to sit on top of the pistons to dissolve the carbon buildup when the engine is off. I don't really know it is bad or good for the engine to do that though lol. I don't think I'm gonna do that to my T/A.

A good compromise might be to take all the spark plugs out and pure a little bit in each cylinder, then crank the engine over a few times after waiting. Probably too much work though lol.
 
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