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Discussion Starter #1
How much oil does your car use?

95 Thunderbird 4.6L 250,000km city 1L per 1000km, highway 1 L per 2000km
94 LHS 3.5L 145,000km, 80% city, 20% highway. 1/2 to 1/4 of a L every 5000km
94 Shadow 2.5L 304,000km 10% city,90% highway 1L per 2500km
88 Mustang 5.0L 280,000km, 10%city, 90% highway, 1L per 1000km
00 VW Golf 2.0L 50,000, all highway 1L per 2000km
 

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97 T-bird 4.6L, 96k miles.

--dino oil(Pennzoil HM; Chevron etc.): none per 3000 miles.

--synthetic(German Castrol 0w/30 right now): 0.75 qt per 3700 miles.(just switched to syn.oil; consumption probably will go down with further changes)
 

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AnthraxBird said:
switching to synthetic at 96k wont help your car any... your just spending more money.
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true...perhaps.

I was (am a little, still) in a sort of expeimentive oil mood; I'll probably switch back to dino again. Rright now I'm having an Used Oil Analysis done with a sample of the last oil I used to see how the engine is wearing generally, if there's anything abnormal going on...with wear metals, air filtration, fuel contamination or anti-freeze in oil etc. 96k is a good time to do that, just in case, and $20 is well worth it, IMO.

However, if the lab tells me that I could've gone a lot further with the syn.oil that I've been using-say, for like 8k miles- I might continue to use syn using very long intervals (they can determine this by looking at the TBN of my used oil, which tells them how much potent my oil still was regarding engine protection).
Then perhaps it may be even more economical than changing with dino-oil every 3k miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ortbird said:

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However, if the lab tells me that I could've gone a lot further with the syn.oil that I've been using-say, for like 8k miles- I might continue to use syn using very long intervals (they can determine this by looking at the TBN of my used oil, which tells them how much potent my oil still was regarding engine protection).
Then perhaps it may be even more economical than changing with dino-oil every 3k miles.
Don't use synthetic for lower consumption, I've tried both in the Thunderbird and the consumption is the same.
Do it for the reduced friction, increased performance, more power, better fuel economy and longer engine life.

Some consumption is normal. When a engine is new it will consume alot as the walls and rings break in. It will become less every oil change, until it gets old and starts to consume more again.
Mid way through an engines life it will consume the least amount but still consume some. An piston ring by design will leave a small, very small amount of oil behind as it travels to BDC, down. This way there is some lubrication for the rings as it goes up to TDC.
Valve seals are also meant to let a miniscule amount of oil by to lubricate the guides.

Members claiming to consume zero oil, how are getting oil to your guides and top rings?
 

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well if my engine is using oil its so miniscual that i cant read it on the dipstick. what im saying is that im not using quarts upon quarts of oil, if i was id have to rebuild it cause i hate having to dump oil in a car all the time.
 

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FordFanatic said:
well if my engine is using oil its so miniscual that i cant read it on the dipstick. what im saying is that im not using quarts upon quarts of oil, if i was id have to rebuild it cause i hate having to dump oil in a car all the time.
you can read your dipstick? lol. My 95 has 97k on the clock and uses about 1qt every 1500 miles. And burns it too. Sometimes I'll give it gas and see a blue cloud of smoke behind me :( Time to port the ehads and replace the seals :D
-Thomas
 

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Discussion Starter #11
FordFanatic said:
well if my engine is using oil its so miniscual that i cant read it on the dipstick. what im saying is that im not using quarts upon quarts of oil, if i was id have to rebuild it cause i hate having to dump oil in a car all the time.
My wife's LHS is like that. So little oil used it scares me.
I've owned over 40 cars and do most of the maintenance on my parents, inlaws, relatives, neighbours and my own cars. Some oil consumption is normal.
Lots even doesn't seem to affect much.
My Mustang used 1 L every 1000km. It still passed emissions tests with very low numbers.
 

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94 T’Bird, 4.6L SOHC, 268K miles, 1 qt every 2200 miles. :D
But I run molasses (20W-50 Valvoline MaxLife) :thumbsup:

97 Mark VIII LSC, 4.6L DOHC, 104K miles, 1 qt every 3000 miles (Castrol 10W-30) :thumbsup:
 

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In the 1994 Service Manual, Ford states that consumption of 1 quart every 900 miles or so is ok (see the sentence I boldfaced in red):

Excessive Engine Oil Consumption

The amount of oil an engine uses will vary with the way the vehicle is driven in addition to normal engine-to-engine variation. This is especially true during the first 16,100 km (10,000 miles) when a new engine is being broken in or until certain internal engine components become conditioned. Vehicles used in heavy-duty operation may use more oil. The following are examples of heavy-duty operation:

--Trailer towing applications.
--Severe loading applications.
--Sustained high speed operation.

Engines need oil to lubricate the following internal components:

--Cylinder block cylinder walls.
--Pistons (6108) and piston rings.
--Intake and exhaust valve stems.
--Intake and exhaust valve guides.
--All internal engine components.

When the pistons move downward, a thin film of oil is left on the cylinder walls. The thin film of oil is burned away on the firing stroke during combustion. If an engine burned a drop of oil during each firing stroke, oil consumption would be about one quart for every mile traveled. Fortunately, modern engines use much less oil than this example. However, even efficient engines will use some oil or they would quickly wear out. Additionally, as the vehicle is operated, some oil is drawn into the combustion chambers past the intake and exhaust valve stem seals (6571) and burned.

Many different conditions can affect oil consumption rates. The following is a partial list of these items:

--Engine size.
--Operator driving habits.
--Ambient temperature.
--Quality and viscosity of the oil.

Operation under varying conditions can frequently be misleading. A vehicle that has been run for several thousand miles on short trips or below freezing ambient temperatures, may have consumed a "normal" amount of oil. However, when checking the engine oil level, it may measure up to the full mark on the oil level dipstick (6750) due to dilution (condensation and fuel) in the engine crankcase. The vehicle then might be driven at high speeds on the highway where the condensation and fuel boil off. The next time the engine oil is checked, it may appear that a quart of oil was used in about 160 km (100 miles). This perceived 160 km (100 miles) per quart oil consumption rate causes customer concern even though the actual overall oil consumption rate is about 2400 km (1500 miles) per quart.

Make sure the selected engine oil meets the recommended API performance category "SG" and SAE viscosity grade as shown in the vehicle Owner Guide. It is also important that the engine oil is changed at the intervals specified for the typical operating conditions. Refer to Section 00-03, Maintenance and Lubrication.

Oil Consumption Test

The following diagnostic procedure is intended to be used to determine the source of excessive internal oil consumption:

1. Determine what is considered excessive oil consumption, such as the number of miles driven per quart of oil. Also determine owner's driving habits, such as sustained high speed operation, towing, extended idle and other considerations.

Oil usage is normally greater during the first 16,100 km (10,000 miles) of service. As mileage increases, oil usage generally decreases. Vehicles in normal service should get at least 1,450 km (900 miles) per quart after 16,100 km (10,000 miles) of service. High speed driving, towing, high ambient temperature and other factors may result in greater oil usage.

NOTE: Vehicles over 8500 gross vehicle weight (GVW) will consume more oil.

2. Verify engine has no external oil leak as outlined under Engine Oil Leaks.
3. Verify engine has correct engine oil level dipstick .
4. Verify that the engine is NOT being run in an overfilled condition. Check the oil level at least five minutes after a hot shutdown with the vehicle parked on a level surface. In no case should the level be above the top of cross-hatch area and "F" in FULL. If a significant overfill is indicated, perform steps 5a through 5d.
5. Perform an oil consumption test:
--a. Drain engine oil, remove oil bypass filter (6714) and refill with one quart less than the recommended amount of oil.
--b. Run the engine for three minutes (10 minutes if cold), then allow oil to drain for at least five minutes with vehicle on level surface.
--c. Remove oil level dipstick and wipe clean. (Do not wipe with anything contaminated with silicone compounds.) Reinstall oil level dipstick being sure to seat the oil level dipstick firmly in the oil level indicator tube (6754) . Remove the oil level dipstick and scribe a mark on the back (unmarked) surface at the indicated oil level. (This level should be about the same as the ADD mark on the face of the oil level dipstick .)
--d. Add one quart of oil. Restart the engine and allow to idle for at least two minutes. Shut off the engine and allow oil to drain back for at least five minutes. Mark the oil level dipstick , using the procedure above. (This level may range from slightly below the top of the cross-hatched area to slightly below the letter "F" in FULL.)
--e. Record vehicle's mileage.
--f. Instruct the owner to drive the vehicle as usual and:
------1. Check the oil level regularly at intervals of 160 to 240 km (100-150 miles).
------2. Return to the service point when the oil level drops below the lower (ADD) mark on the oil level dipstick .
------3. In an emergency, add only full quarts of the same oil and note the mileage at which the oil is added.
--g. Check the oil level under the same conditions and at the same location as in Steps c and d above.
------1. Measure the distance from the oil level to the UPPER scribe mark on the oil level dipstick and record.
------2. Measure the distance between the two scribe marks and record.
------3. Divide the first measurement by the second.
------4. Divide the distance driven during the oil test by the result. This quantity is the approximate oil consumption rate in miles per quart (MPQ).
--h. If the oil consumption rate determined is unacceptable, proceed to Step 6.
6. Check PCV system. Make sure system is not plugged.
7. Check for plugged oil drain-back holes in cylinder heads (6049) and cylinder block (6010) .
8. If, after performing the above, the condition still exists, proceed to Step 9.
9. Perform a cylinder compression test as outlined, and/or perform a cylinder leak detection test with Rotunda Cylinder Leak Detection Kit 014-00705 or equivalent. This can be helpful in determining source of oil consumption, such as valves, piston rings or other areas.
10. Check valve guides for excessive guide clearance. Replace all valve stem seals after correct valve guide clearance has been verified.
11. Worn or damaged internal engine components can cause excessive oil consumption. Small deposits of oil on tip of spark plugs (12405) can be a clue to internal oil consumption. If internal oil consumption still persists, proceed as follows:
--a. Remove engine from vehicle and place it on an engine work stand. Remove intake manifolds (9424) , cylinder heads , oil pan (6675) and oil pump (6600) . Refer to Section 03-01A (3.8L) or Section 03-01B (4.6L).
--b. Check piston ring clearance, ring gap and ring orientation. Service as required.
--c. Check for excessive bearing clearance. Service as required.
NOTE: After determine if worn parts should be replaced, make sure correct replacement parts are used.
12. Perform Oil Consumption Test as outlined to confirm oil consumption concern has been resolved.

Lately, I've been adding a quart at about 1500 miles.
 
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