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Discussion Starter #1
A buddy of mine has a Lincoln Town Car. Not sure of the year, but the engine looks identical to the one that came out of my '95 bird. His oil light came on. Since he was near a stealership when it came on, he drove in. They said the problem is the oil pump. Now, I know it could be other things, ie. sending unit, clogged filter. But assuming the worst... how hard is the oil pump to replace? I looked in my Explorer motor and noticed that it is mounted around the crankshaft, but I couldn't tell if the crankshaft has to be removed. Special tools needed? It definately looks nothing like the traditional V8 oil pump.
 

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I believe the front cover has to come off (this I know) and everything on the front cover (PS pump...) I think it is just on the crank, the crank should be able to stay in i would imagine.

Joe
 

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To Remove.

1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
2. Remove the valve covers, engine front cover, and the oil pan.
3. Remove the timing chains
4. Remove the 2 bolts retaining the oil pickup tube to the main bearing stud spacer. Remove the pickup tube.
5. Unfasten the 4 bolts retaining the oil pump to the cylinder block, then remove the oil pump.

To Install.

6. Rotate the inner rotor of the oil pump to align with the flats on the crankshaft and install the oil pump flush with the cylinder block.
7. Install the four retaining bolts, then tighten to 71-106 inch lbs.
8. Clean the oil pickup tube and replace the O-ring.
9. Place the pickup tube on the oil pump and hand start the 2 retaining bolts. Install the bolt retaining the pickup tube to the main bearing stud spacer hand-tight. Tighten the pick-up tube-to-oil pump bolts to 72-106 inch lbs. Tighten the pickup tube-to-main bearing stud spacer bolt to 15-22 ft lbs.
10. Instal a new oil filter.
11. Install the timing chains.
12. Install the oil pan, engine frong cover, and valve covers.
13. Fill the crankcase with the proper type and quantity of engine oil.
14. Connect the negative battery cable, then start the engine and check for leaks.

All of this information is a direct copy from the chiltons on the 83-97 T-Bird/Cougar manual. All information is for the 4.6L. It didn't mention it but I bet you'll have to pull the crank pulley as well....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow. Pretty thorough info. While that does seem like a fairly in depth project, it doesn't sound like something I would be scared to try. I haven't looked at it, but I would think that unlike the MN12, the oil pan can be lowered enough on the Town Car to get the oil pump off. (After raising the engine, of course.) Doesn't sound like it would take $5000 like he was quoted.
 

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Yeah...$5000, you might as well drop a built motor in with a blower (almost...) for that! You could have it changed out in a day's time easy. I'm pretty sure though that the front will have to come off cause the pump slides over the crank.

Joe
 

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There will be places to "cut corners" he was probably quoted a price on book time. If you have some tools, it could be done at home for the cost of the oil pump plus some time. I can almost swear I unbolted my pickup from the oil pump without removing the oilpan a few years ago on my 2V 4.6. Obviously removing the front cover is required. If I was in this situation, I would pull the front cover and see what's up. Tearing into things on your own is fun.
-Rob
 

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In fact you can get by on a 4.6 without dropping the pan. There is just enough room with the timing cover and all removed to get in at the two bolts holding the pickup tube on and get them off, pull the pump and reinstall it and then reinstall them. Make sure you have a nice magnetic pickup around though I managed to drop the bolts twice when I did it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What a day. This buddy of mine (more of an acquaintance) decided that he doesn't want to mess with this car. I have been keeping him up to date with my Thunderbird project, so he thinks I am a gearhead. (I guess I am, sort of, but just a novice.) He originally bought the car for an employee of his. When his employee quit, he decided that he would drive the car until it died. So he tells me that he is sure that the oil pump is bad on it. I told him 3 or 4 times that it could be the sending unit. He is the kind of guy who has probably never so much as changed the wiper blades on a car, but he insists that the oil pump is bad, it only has a couple hundred miles left. Then he signed the title and handed it along with the keys to me and said "It's yours."
I went outside to look at this car and it is immaculate. A '93 Lincoln Towncar Signature Series with every bell and whistle available. I started it up and it ran perfectly.
I tried to drive it home today. I figured, if it is running as smooth as it is, the oil pump must be working. Since the oil light was going on and off intermittantly, I decided it must be the sending unit. So I got someone to follow me home.
About 15 miles into the trek, the engine quit and I coasted into a parking lot. I managed to start it again, but it was making noises as if the oil had run dry. It only ran for a split second before I cut it off, but it was not knocking or making any other horrible noises.
I really wasn't looking for another project, but what was I supposed to do? "No thank you. I don't want a free luxury car." Yeah, right. I guess I have a project for this spring.
 
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