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So I just picked up a newer gen Mark 8 oil pan, I want to get it powdercoated on just the bottom surface to protect it from rusting out, etc. I have heard that powder coating will melt the solder from joints in most oil pans when in the oven. However I'm fairly certain there are not plastic bits in MK8 pans, and they are actually fully welded, not soldered. Let me know what you guys think. Anybody know what ford's factory means of coating it was?
 

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So I just picked up a newer gen Mark 8 oil pan, I want to get it powdercoated on just the bottom surface to protect it from rusting out, etc. I have heard that powder coating will melt the solder from joints in most oil pans when in the oven. However I'm fairly certain there are not plastic bits in MK8 pans, and they are actually fully welded, not soldered. Let me know what you guys think. Anybody know what ford's factory means of coating it was?
Not sure if powdercoating would cause harm or not, but what about using a rhinoliner type product on the exterior surface?

If it's nice and clean, and painted, it should offer a good, resilient surface to protect it, shouldn't it?
 

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If you're using plastic to solder it's no wonder you suck at it :tongue:

To answer your question though the stock finish is paint and things like the baffles and scrapers are steel and spot welded on. I think the tumor may be copper brazed though, but the melting point is WAY above that of powder coating temperatures.

It ain't going to rust out where you live regardless
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you're using plastic to solder it's no wonder you suck at it :tongue:

To answer your question though the stock finish is paint and things like the baffles and scrapers are steel and spot welded on. I think the tumor may be copper brazed though, but the melting point is WAY above that of powder coating temperatures.

It ain't going to rust out where you live regardless
I'm not taking any chances lol. We do still get snow here and they have begun to use salt brine to pre-treat roads which they never used to. So all in all, the answer is : Yes I could powdercoat the bottom surface of the pan. What can I do about the upper lip where the gasket goes, as the paint is chipped off it from the old gasket, just repaint the lip? I really don't feel like having any powdercoat INSIDE the pan at all costs.
 

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For element protection go with the Rhinoliner that Woodman suggested. It doesn't have to be powercoat pretty.

IMHO you're wasting money vs going with a good coat of paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
For element protection go with the Rhinoliner that Woodman suggested. It doesn't have to be powercoat pretty.
Quite honestly my powder coater said he can get it done cheaper than the bedliner shop would, and he knows what he's doing. I'm just doing a basic shiny black finish, nothing special.
 

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Paint works well too and I guarantee that's the lowest cost option.
 

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If you have salt on roads why drive your baby in winter. Just buy anouther car for winter. I am florida so what do I know we can drive are cars any time we want
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am fine having just this car as my DD for now; I am a full time college student.
 

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Money is no object, as this is going to be going on my top secret engine build. :grin2:
I'm sure your powder coater guy will appreciate the extra business and money in his pocket and I'm sure the road will appreciate your purdy powder coated oil pan because no body else is going to see it and it's not going to protect the pan any better than a good coat of paint.

I look forward to hearing more about this build. When do you anticipate finishing it and making the grand reveal?

BTW, I though you graduated? Are you going back for another degree?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm sure your powder coater guy will appreciate the extra business and money in his pocket and I'm sure the road will appreciate your purdy powder coated oil pan because no body else is going to see it and it's not going to protect the pan any better than a good coat of paint.

I look forward to hearing more about this build. When do you anticipate finishing it and making the grand reveal?

BTW, I though you graduated? Are you going back for another degree?
I have a long way to go on this build...I've told you the details before, but I guess you forgot the build plans lol. It's just getting started, and will take me a good long while, but it's a start nonetheless. I'll reveal it once I have the Long block assembled. I suppose.

Not yet, I'm a double major student, as it sits I will graduate with both Bachelor degrees December 2016.
 

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Yea, I forgot. LOL

If I don't write something like that down it's gone. My memory sucks.
 

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I'm not taking any chances lol. We do still get snow here and they have begun to use salt brine to pre-treat roads which they never used to. So all in all, the answer is : Yes I could powdercoat the bottom surface of the pan. What can I do about the upper lip where the gasket goes, as the paint is chipped off it from the old gasket, just repaint the lip? I really don't feel like having any powdercoat INSIDE the pan at all costs.
Any machined surface or surface that a gasket sits on can be taped off with a special high temp powder coating tape..

You don't need to paint any surface that uses a gasket in between..

Likewise you shouldn't powder coat a machined surface either..

When a gasket surface is painted or powder coated over, it is more likely to leak there..

That's one of the reasons chromed oil pans/valve covers/timing covers have a reputation for leaking..
Because the surface is so slick..It makes it harder to seal..







Rayo..
 

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If your super secret engine build is going to involve any temp sensors, you might as well plan on welding the bung on BEFORE you send it off for powder coating and/or paint it.

Also, when welding a bung on to the oil pan, it was recommended to me to weld it on while it was bolted to the engine block to prevent welding heat from distorting the oil pan seal. I of course drilled the hole for the bung with the oil pan OFF first (to prevent oil pan bits from entering the block).


-g
 
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