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Discussion Starter #1
So outta curiosity anyone have what appears to be chocolate syrup/milkshap crap instead of power steering fluid? Cause that is what I have. And this isn't the first time that it has happened. I had the power steering system flushed about 7 months ago. It uses up fluid, and I just put a 1/3-1/2 quart into it 2 weeks ago. I don't remember noticing it was milk shake looking then. Any ideas? What causing it, what fixes it, etc... Thanx

Sam
 

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Before I rebuilt the engine on my XR7, I had this problem. I would flush the entire system and refill with new tranny fluid (Mercon 3 is recommended I believe). Some time later, it would look like crap again.

When I rebuilt the engine, I replaced the power steering pump. Problem solved! Maybe the old pump was aerating the fluid or something....I don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How hard and what would be involved in replacing the power steering pump?

Sam
 

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flush the system with ATF before you replace it.

I bought a few bottles of ATF and flushed it in my old car, no big deal.

If you have mercon V laying around that works too.
 

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Replacing the pump is not a fun project. The radiator and fan have to come out so that you have room to work. The bolt are a bear to get to and I couldn't even get to them without removing the pulley. Some people say they have done it without removing it, but I don't know how. You have to have a power steering pully puller to get the pulley off. If you have a Harbor Freight tools store near to you, you can buy one for 10-15 dollars, or you can borrow one for free (with deposit) from Autozone.
Putting the pully back on also requires the puller...it actually press the pulley back on the new pumps shaft. It's not terribly easy as it requires you to hold the pulley stationary while you turn the wrench, many times. Same deal with removing it. It's not fun. Not to forget the lines, which are tough to get a wrench on and even tougher to turn any distance. Then there's the teflon washer seal that comes with the new pump. The old one has to come out and the new one has to go on correctly, which was tough for me. First time I had a massive leak because the washer came off while I was tightening the line and I couldn't tell. It's all one big PITA to tell the truth.

But think of it this way....how much are you willing to pay somebody else to do it? Probalbly nothing at all if you are anything like me. I'm tired of getting ripped of by questionable mechanics, especially when I'm qualified to do it myself.

If you are going to own an older car, better be prepared for the aggrivation of learning to work on it yourself, or paying someone else lots of $ to work on it for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Justin: Already had that done. I had the entire system pressure flushed. Cleaned it all out, put new stuff in, drove around the block a few times, then repeated th process. Spent $80 having that done 6 months ago 15k miles.

Rustyul: I am a lot like you I don't want to pay anyone anything anymore to work on my cars. However, I am not like you in as far as I don't have a clue what I am doing :) Hasn't stopped me in the past, so I doubt it will stop me this time. I think I will see if there is someone around denver here who knows what they are doing and doesn't mind drinking a few beers making sure I don't F things up to bad.

Sam
 

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is the valvoline synthetic power steering fluid compatible with ours? the color of the fluid is clear one.
 

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AH old thread!

Anyways, is it okay to mix PS fluid with mercon? Or should I flush it all out with mercon until it's pure mercon?

-Thomas
 

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This isn't the greatest way to flush the system but it worked pretty well for me.

1) Go to an auto parts store and pick up one of the turkey-baster looking things they market as battery fillers.

2) Get some power steering fluid, transmissoin fluid, or the fluid of your choice...and get about 3 - 5 quarts worth. I personally used B&M Trick Shift because I knew it was partially transparent and thought it would be easiest to judge how clean the system was by what the fluid looked like after I "flushed" it.

3) With the car off, open the reservoir cap and have an empty container at hand to put the old fluid in once you suck it out. Squeeze the rubber handle of the battery filler, THEN insert the filler into the reservoir. Let the handle of the filler expand and suck the fluid out of the reservoir...if you do this well you should only have to do this about 3 times to empty it completely. Fill the reservior with new fluid, start the car, and let it run for a couple minutes...turn the wheel back and forth to circulate the new fluid in the rack and lines, then repeat the process until you've gone through at least 3 quarts of your chosen new fluid.

B&M Trick Shift works fine for me, but it's pricey at about 5 bucks a quart. Mercon V should work as well and is significantly cheaper.

-DG-
 
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