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Discussion Starter #1
Is it just me or is the hardest part about doin this job is getting the door panel off? Anyone else feel this way?
 

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PostWhore, The AFDB is on a lil tight.
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I'd say hardest part is cleaning the old garbage out of the regulator.
 

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Hardest part was getting my hand in behind to hold the new motor to start the screws ... I'm strongly right-handed, and for the driver's side door, I had to use the uncoordinated left hand to start the screws. Never been good screwing with the left hand ...

Door panel is easy if you remember to a) remove all the screws, b) check beside / inside the light on the door (early MN12s the screw is beside it, later it's inside), and c) LIFT IT UP TO REMOVE IT.

RwP
 

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i think this was the only job that i have ever done on a car that something else didnt break... so what i am saying is, i have no complaints.
 

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Never been good screwing with the left hand ...
Quoted because I found it amusing :D

And glad to see this thread - I'm going to be changing my drivers one tomorrow in hopes to fix my window issue.

-Melon
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well that I can understand. They are kinda hidden. You didn't unscrew the buttons too did you? You can actually put the whole button panel thru the hole in the door. Most instructions on the net say to remove the buttons.
actually i did
 

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Okay, here's the issue I have...
When I press the window buttons my motors work fine I assume cuz I can here them running but the windows freeze until I assist them.. I heard it could be a pin kit for both sides, but what do I look for to confirm it once the panels are off!?! Sorry for jacking the thread!..
 

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I had the same issue with my window - I'd push the button and hear the motor running but it would only move in short bursts unless I helped it up or down. And then finally, it didn't move at all even with help.

When you remove the door panel, you'll see 3 rivets - I did not remove these. If you look a bit closer, you'll see 3 bolts - those are what hold the motor on. Remove the door speaker, then those 3 bolts. You can get the motor out through the speaker hole. Once removed, just unplug the motor and it's free from the car. I had spare motors so I can't speak for replacing the pins or anything.

The hardest part I had was lining up the motor to bolt it back into place. Otherwise, it's very simple.

-Melon
 

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There are plastic bushings around the motor gear. Cheap and easy to replace once you get the motor out. Any parts store should sell them. Tell them you need a window motor repair kit for a Ford, they will know what you mean.
 

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Yeh, I had to do both my windows, too. The pack comes with 6 teflon balls and I paid $3 for mine from Napa. Each window motor takes three. You'll see them when you take your door apart and take the motor out. I drilled out the rivets and bolted my window motors back to the door. Did anyone else do theirs that way?
 

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I was having a problem with my driver's-side window, so I replaced both of my window motors (I decided to do both since they weren't that much money). My original motors were NOT riveted in, but the were attached with bolts instead. The whole job was very easy.

However, this did NOT solve my problem! My passenger-side window goes up and down fine, but my driver's-side still slows down and acts as if its "binding" on the way down. Sometimes I have to put my hand on it and force it down. Once it gets past a certain point, it then starts operating normally again. I believe the problem lies in the window run channel. If it is not in perfect condition and not positioned perfectly, the window will not go up and down smoothly. I've tried adjusting it, but I just can't get it to work properly. Part of the problem is that the bolt attaching the window run channel (or door glass run, as it's also called) to the door pulled through the door and the glass run was rattling inside the door for the longest time. I didn't even realize that was what was rattling until I took the door panel off to replace the window motor. I reattached it by using a washer under the bolt head that was a larger diameter thatn the bolt head/hole in the metal, but I still just can't get it to operate properly. I'm at a loss as to what to do next as these door glass runs are no longer available from Ford.

Dennis
 

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I was having a problem with my driver's-side window, so I replaced both of my window motors (I decided to do both since they weren't that much money). My original motors were NOT riveted in, but the were attached with bolts instead. The whole job was very easy.

However, this did NOT solve my problem! My passenger-side window goes up and down fine, but my driver's-side still slows down and acts as if its "binding" on the way down. Sometimes I have to put my hand on it and force it down. Once it gets past a certain point, it then starts operating normally again. I believe the problem lies in the window run channel. If it is not in perfect condition and not positioned perfectly, the window will not go up and down smoothly. I've tried adjusting it, but I just can't get it to work properly. Part of the problem is that the bolt attaching the window run channel (or door glass run, as it's also called) to the door pulled through the door and the glass run was rattling inside the door for the longest time. I didn't even realize that was what was rattling until I took the door panel off to replace the window motor. I reattached it by using a washer under the bolt head that was a larger diameter thatn the bolt head/hole in the metal, but I still just can't get it to operate properly. I'm at a loss as to what to do next as these door glass runs are no longer available from Ford.

Dennis
Try lubing up the felt glass runs with liberal amounts of silicone spray (can't hurt, right? And its suggested in the manual too). Lube up the internal regulator tracks too with teflon grease.
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread. The OP has probably done the job already, but anyway, my 2 cents. This is for the novices at this sort of repair. Seasoned mechanics may not get much out of it (but you can fact-check me if you like):

I recently repaired my driver's side door motor. The urethane bushings were ground into a million bits (yes, I counted them! ok, I didn't).

Don't plan on replacing your original '96 metal gear assembly that press fits in/atop the bushings with the one from Cardone, because it DOESN'T FIT W/O MODDING. The lip/rim of the sleeve sits too high to fit under the gear housing seal plate. I was determined to make it work, so I spent more time on it than I should have. Filing that sleeve down took a long time -- had to go easy and do many fit checks or I'd have filed off too much; and it filed like it was hardened steel (the sleeve), using an almost new file. If your old gear assembly isn't trashed, save yourself the trouble and reuse it!
All you're likely to need for most stuttering/bumping/stalling fixes are the new urethane bushings anyway.

The Cardone plastic worm gear appeared tough enough and it fit the motor housing just fine, so I used it.

Those considering repairing their own window motor need to be mindful of the regulator counterbalance spring. If you remove just the motor from the door w/o the regulator arms fixed in position, the spring will snap the regulator arm down HARD toward the bottom of the door after you push out the last motor bolt -- if your finger(s) are caught in the wrong spot, it is forceful enough to do serious damage to it/them.

IMHO, it's better to remove the regulator with motor attached, for several reasons:
1. It's safer, because the motor gear will keep the spring in place -- use a bench vise to help you ease off the spring tension as you dismount the motor.
2. You can clean the regulator with it off the vehicle -- mine was getting some rust, so I wire brushed it down nice-n-clean. I also removed all the old lube with a screwdriver and aerosol cleaner, as it was dry/hard in spots.
3. You can easily relube the regulator -- can be done on vehicle, but much more difficult to get at and you can't effectively clean the old lube gunk off (trying to will make a mess inside your door as well). The Cardone kit came with some kind of red grease (it looks like bearing grease), which I used on the metal external gear, but I opted for white lithium grease on the internal worm gear(s), regulator joints, spring and plastic channel slides. I already had the lithium grease in a syringe, ready to get in the recesses; the red grease packet had a cut-away "nozzle" end that made for easy enough application on the motor gear.

If you're worried about drilling out the large rivets, don't. You do not need new rivets. To reattach my regulator, I used stainless, truss head (perhaps they're panhead, but a low-profile version if so) hex bolts with stainless, external-toothed lockwashers and stainless nuts. I got these from the local Home Depot and Lowes, so they aren't hard to find.
The bolt head goes on the inside of the door to ensure clearance and there's room for the nuts/washers in the rivet pits on the trim side of the door. I used a 3/8" drive hex bit to tighten them down -- people with really large arms/hands might have difficulty with this, as it's a tight squeeze in there and you have to feel your way around to get the bit engaged on the bolt (there's no room for even a small lighted service mirror; I tried it). A 1/4" drive with a shorter bit might help some, but there's still very little maneuvering room in there.
Sorry, I don't have the exact bolt dimensions handy, as I've misplaced the packaging and the bolts are on the assembled door. I can look for them if anyone needs specs.
Meanwhile, just measure the holes in the door, the thicknesses of the regulator, door and the nut+washer, and get bolts just long enough that the ends are flush with the nut once tightened. You can cut them to length, but stainless IS tougher to machine, so best to get the right length to begin with. You don't have to use stainless, of course. I chose to because I didn't want to take the chance of having to deal with rusted bolts should I need to remove the regulator again. Stainless hardware does cost more, but it was worth it to me. I know, zinc plate... but I couldn't find any the right size and they're not as rustproof as stainless anyway.

The motor itself was a mess. First, I had to clean out all the bits and pieces of bushings. They were in every conceivable nook and cranny of the entire housing. To remove it all, I had to completely disassemble the motor. For the uninitiated, reassembly can be tricky if you aren't careful. You should note the order and orientation of the parts as they're removed so you don't forget something, and you must remember to use the brush retainer to keep them off the rotor during assembly -- otherwise you'll be tempted to push the rotor back in normally, but it won't fully insert (even though it looks like it should fit!). This is not my first electric motor disassembly, not by a long shot. However, everything flew apart upon dismantling this one, so it took me a while to figure out how the brushes were held in place -- it's done with a plastic shaft sleeve (one which I had carelessly placed away from my work area). When you push the motor assembly back into the gear housing, the worm shaft catches on a rim, which in turn pushes the sleeve down the shaft and off the brushes, freeing them. Whatever you do, do not lose or damage this retaining sleeve! Because the brushes are completely covered by the motor casing during reattachment to the gear housing, it is impossible to get any tools in there to manually hold the brushes, and you'll be hard pressed to find a suitable replacement, even from a plastic supply house (e.g., a tube to cut one from).

My motor has been working flawlessly for months with the Cardone kit, after the aforementioned mod, which shouldn't have been necessary. The window is faster/smoother than the passenger side, so I may refurb that one soon for good measure, even though it's been used far less than the driver's side.

Good luck!
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread. The OP has probably done the job already, but anyway, my 2 cents. This is for the novices at this sort of repair. Seasoned mechanics may not get much out of it (but you can fact-check me if you like):

I recently repaired my driver's side door motor. The urethane bushings were ground into a million bits (yes, I counted them! ok, I didn't).

Don't plan on replacing your original '96 metal gear assembly that press fits in/atop the bushings with the one from Cardone, because it DOESN'T FIT W/O MODDING. The lip/rim of the sleeve sits too high to fit under the gear housing seal plate. I was determined to make it work, so I spent more time on it than I should have. Filing that sleeve down took a long time -- had to go easy and do many fit checks or I'd have filed off too much; and it filed like it was hardened steel (the sleeve), using an almost new file. If your old gear assembly isn't trashed, save yourself the trouble and reuse it!
All you're likely to need for most stuttering/bumping/stalling fixes are the new urethane bushings anyway.

The Cardone plastic worm gear appeared tough enough and it fit the motor housing just fine, so I used it.

Those considering repairing their own window motor need to be mindful of the regulator counterbalance spring. If you remove just the motor from the door w/o the regulator arms fixed in position, the spring will snap the regulator arm down HARD toward the bottom of the door after you push out the last motor bolt -- if your finger(s) are caught in the wrong spot, it is forceful enough to do serious damage to it/them.

IMHO, it's better to remove the regulator with motor attached, for several reasons:
1. It's safer, because the motor gear will keep the spring in place -- use a bench vise to help you ease off the spring tension as you dismount the motor.
2. You can clean the regulator with it off the vehicle -- mine was getting some rust, so I wire brushed it down nice-n-clean. I also removed all the old lube with a screwdriver and aerosol cleaner, as it was dry/hard in spots.
3. You can easily relube the regulator -- can be done on vehicle, but much more difficult to get at and you can't effectively clean the old lube gunk off (trying to will make a mess inside your door as well). The Cardone kit came with some kind of red grease (it looks like bearing grease), which I used on the metal external gear, but I opted for white lithium grease on the internal worm gear(s), regulator joints, spring and plastic channel slides. I already had the lithium grease in a syringe, ready to get in the recesses; the red grease packet had a cut-away "nozzle" end that made for easy enough application on the motor gear.

If you're worried about drilling out the large rivets, don't. You do not need new rivets. To reattach my regulator, I used stainless, truss head (perhaps they're panhead, but a low-profile version if so) hex bolts with stainless, external-toothed lockwashers and stainless nuts. I got these from the local Home Depot and Lowes, so they aren't hard to find.
The bolt head goes on the inside of the door to ensure clearance and there's room for the nuts/washers in the rivet pits on the trim side of the door. I used a 3/8" drive hex bit to tighten them down -- people with really large arms/hands might have difficulty with this, as it's a tight squeeze in there and you have to feel your way around to get the bit engaged on the bolt (there's no room for even a small lighted service mirror; I tried it). A 1/4" drive with a shorter bit might help some, but there's still very little maneuvering room in there.
Sorry, I don't have the exact bolt dimensions handy, as I've misplaced the packaging and the bolts are on the assembled door. I can look for them if anyone needs specs.
Meanwhile, just measure the holes in the door, the thicknesses of the regulator, door and the nut+washer, and get bolts just long enough that the ends are flush with the nut once tightened. You can cut them to length, but stainless IS tougher to machine, so best to get the right length to begin with. You don't have to use stainless, of course. I chose to because I didn't want to take the chance of having to deal with rusted bolts should I need to remove the regulator again. Stainless hardware does cost more, but it was worth it to me. I know, zinc plate... but I couldn't find any the right size and they're not as rustproof as stainless anyway.

The motor itself was a mess. First, I had to clean out all the bits and pieces of bushings. They were in every conceivable nook and cranny of the entire housing. To remove it all, I had to completely disassemble the motor. For the uninitiated, reassembly can be tricky if you aren't careful. You should note the order and orientation of the parts as they're removed so you don't forget something, and you must remember to use the brush retainer to keep them off the rotor during assembly -- otherwise you'll be tempted to push the rotor back in normally, but it won't fully insert (even though it looks like it should fit!). This is not my first electric motor disassembly, not by a long shot. However, everything flew apart upon dismantling this one, so it took me a while to figure out how the brushes were held in place -- it's done with a plastic shaft sleeve (one which I had carelessly placed away from my work area). When you push the motor assembly back into the gear housing, the worm shaft catches on a rim, which in turn pushes the sleeve down the shaft and off the brushes, freeing them. Whatever you do, do not lose or damage this retaining sleeve! Because the brushes are completely covered by the motor casing during reattachment to the gear housing, it is impossible to get any tools in there to manually hold the brushes, and you'll be hard pressed to find a suitable replacement, even from a plastic supply house (e.g., a tube to cut one from).

My motor has been working flawlessly for months with the Cardone kit, after the aforementioned mod, which shouldn't have been necessary. The window is faster/smoother than the passenger side, so I may refurb that one soon for good measure, even though it's been used far less than the driver's side.

Good luck!
Let me pick your brain. Mine's a 95 (don't know if there's any difference in the window assembly) & my window would go up part way, stop & kind of twitch, go & finally quite working altogether. I can hear the motor spinning but the window doesn't move. I am assuming some gear has stripped. Is this what happened to yours?
I went on NAPA's website & found what's called a lift motor gear kit (P/N RAY 4922283). Is this what I need to replace?
Thanks for any help
 

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I just repaired both windows on both thirds. I used advanced auto window motor lift kit pn below. Yours sounds correct.

When you take the motor cover off, the issue is clear. I had to dissassemble the motor to properly clean the worm gear on most of the motors. Bit tricky but not hard. You do NOT have to drill out the rivets. 3 bolts drop the motor. I can do these in my sleep now.

84635
 
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