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· The Parts Guy
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What's to prevent them from rolling back in an accident and potentially impaling the back of the rear seat passengers? Just something to consider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What's to prevent them from rolling back in an accident and potentially impaling the back of the rear seat passengers? Just something to consider.
Rolling back? 🤔

The rods go straight down and sit flush between the seat back and that V-shaped brace.

I thought this would make the rear seat safer...but I can take another look at it tomorrow.
 

· The Parts Guy
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Rolling back? 🤔

The rods go straight down and sit flush between the seat back and that V-shaped brace.

I thought this would make the rear seat safer...but I can take another look at it tomorrow.
Yes, in a rear collision, the passenger(s) head(s) are driven back into the headrest(s). If there is no structure present to prevent the headrests from rolling back, the headrest shafts will pivot forward into the passenger(s).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Alright...after @racecougar pointed out the risk, however minuscule, that the rods without any structural support could pierce through the foam and hit an occupants back, I decided to re-think this mod:

- I do like the look; makes the rear compartment look more finished

- I am ok with the headrests being comfort features rather than safety restraints, since the car didn't even come with such rear head restraints

- I do have holes now...so canceling the mod entirely isn't an option

So I drilled out the rods from the inner body of the headrests and kept the inner body only (I didn't takea photo, so this will have to suffice):


Then I used sturdy rubber bands to secure the headrests:



The plastic piece (slat from blinds) is there to prevent the rubber band from cutting into the foam.
 

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This posting/comments reminds me of an interesting true story a client told me years ago that makes you realize how much force there is in an accident, like a rear-ender:

Client was in the Air Force in the 70-80's, in Italy, serving a position in safety engineering & safety forensics...something like that.
Another airman was driving a little Italian sports car and ran into the back of a parked car...and he died instantly in the driver's seat...so my client's team was sent out to figure out what happened.
Initially, no injuries or cause of death that they can find...he's just dead after rear-ending a parked car.
Then they find that the back of his skull has a 1-2" triangular hole at the base...and they're like, "WTF...what caused this?"
Then they found a box of Kleenex in the car with a bloody corner...and they started putting the situation together.

What they discovered is that when he ran into the parked car, the sudden stop & force of the impact sent the box of Kleenex
flying off the rear parcel shelf like a missile, with enough force for the box corner to punch a hole into the back of his skull, then fall back to floor.
Older Italian sports car, no headrests...you get the picture.

Game over.

Weird one-in-a-million way to go...but it makes you realize how massive the forces are in car accidents & the sudden stops, when something like this can happen.
 

· SuperNewbie
1995 Thunderbird LX Missing 4.6 MIssing Trans Red
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This posting/comments reminds me of an interesting true story a client told me years ago that makes you realize how much force there is in an accident, like a rear-ender:

Client was in the Air Force in the 70-80's, in Italy, serving a position in safety engineering & safety forensics...something like that.
Another airman was driving a little Italian sports car and ran into the back of a parked car...and he died instantly in the driver's seat...so my client's team was sent out to figure out what happened.
Initially, no injuries or cause of death that they can find...he's just dead after rear-ending a parked car.
Then they find that the back of his skull has a 1-2" triangular hole at the base...and they're like, "WTF...what caused this?"
Then they found a box of Kleenex in the car with a bloody corner...and they started putting the situation together.

What they discovered is that when he ran into the parked car, the sudden stop & force of the impact sent the box of Kleenex
flying off the rear parcel shelf like a missile, with enough force for the box corner to punch a hole into the back of his skull, then fall back to floor.
Older Italian sports car, no headrests...you get the picture.

Game over.

Weird one-in-a-million way to go...but it makes you realize how massive the forces are in car accidents & the sudden stops, when something like this can happen.
Crazy stuff, you just never know what can happen.
 
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· Administrator
1994 Cougar XR7 DOHC/5-Speed
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This posting/comments reminds me of an interesting true story a client told me years ago that makes you realize how much force there is in an accident, like a rear-ender:

Client was in the Air Force in the 70-80's, in Italy, serving a position in safety engineering & safety forensics...something like that.
Another airman was driving a little Italian sports car and ran into the back of a parked car...and he died instantly in the driver's seat...so my client's team was sent out to figure out what happened.
Initially, no injuries or cause of death that they can find...he's just dead after rear-ending a parked car.
Then they find that the back of his skull has a 1-2" triangular hole at the base...and they're like, "WTF...what caused this?"
Then they found a box of Kleenex in the car with a bloody corner...and they started putting the situation together.

What they discovered is that when he ran into the parked car, the sudden stop & force of the impact sent the box of Kleenex
flying off the rear parcel shelf like a missile, with enough force for the box corner to punch a hole into the back of his skull, then fall back to floor.
Older Italian sports car, no headrests...you get the picture.

Game over.

Weird one-in-a-million way to go...but it makes you realize how massive the forces are in car accidents & the sudden stops, when something like this can happen.
Not to trivialize the story, but an airsoft BB travels 200-400 ft/s (126-272mph) and from firsthand experience they don’t even break the skin at close range. At best the speed the box of Kleenex was traveling was the speed the car was going before impact, and at the aeformentioned “BB gun speeds” the car, any car, new or old, is unsurvivable at a 126-0mph impact, it will be like a squashed soda can, so since the cause of death was so mysterious I can assume the speed wasn’t anywhere near there - under 50mph? - and that isn’t even considering the Kleenex box having to overcome the friction that had been holding it to the package tray, the aerodynamic friction, the short distance of a Italian sports car cockpit, or the energy absorbed between the two cars that all would slow down the speed of the Kleenex box.

Not to mention the cardboard will deform before the human skull, I currently am suffering an annoying cold and caved in the corners of a tissue box just peeling off the protective plastic packaging!
 

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Not to trivialize the story, but an airsoft BB travels 200-400 ft/s (126-272mph) and from firsthand experience they don’t even break the skin at close range. At best the speed the box of Kleenex was traveling was the speed the car was going before impact, and at the aeformentioned “BB gun speeds” the car, any car, new or old, is unsurvivable at a 126-0mph impact, it will be like a squashed soda can, so since the cause of death was so mysterious I can assume the speed wasn’t anywhere near there - under 50mph? - and that isn’t even considering the Kleenex box having to overcome the friction that had been holding it to the package tray, the aerodynamic friction, the short distance of a Italian sports car cockpit, or the energy absorbed between the two cars that all would slow down the speed of the Kleenex box.

Not to mention the cardboard will deform before the human skull, I currently am suffering an annoying cold and caved in the corners of a tissue box just peeling off the protective plastic packaging!
They're the military safety engineers who figured it out.
We've all seen weird schiff happen that didn't make sense...but one variable made all the difference.
And a soft round airsoft BB isn't the hard pointy corner of a cardboard box from decades ago, unlike the pathetic weak suck cardboard we have today.

Hope you feel better.
 

· The Parts Guy
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'50-'60's car tissue dispensers were steel. They weren't light either.
 

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'50-'60's car tissue dispensers were steel. They weren't light either.
Those are good points. He told me the story several years ago, so details are a bit fuzzy now...I just remember the gist of it. And he died of cancer in 2017, so I can't ask him again.

Merry Christmas all.
 

· The Parts Guy
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I recall an accident years back down the road from our place where the driver lost his life in a similar circumstance. He had speaker boxes on the rear package shelf that became missiles in the accident. Lifeflight was checking out our fields trying to find the best place to land.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Alright, alright, alright...just to put all concerns to rest, should there be any: the headrests are secured with sturdy rubber bungees, two each. They do contain the metal inner body; however, there's fabric all around plus foam on all sides except the bottom. And they aren't heavy at all since the rods, which were removed, were the heaviest part of the headrests. I really can't imagine any scenario where they could pose a safety risk.
 
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