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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I need to know what are the differences between the 92 Sc engine and the 94 Sc engine. Im keep it stock so that way it will be easier to make it work. I ordered a 92 timing cover and oil pan, I noticed there was a sensor on the bottom of the 94 block is that the oil sensor? If so can I just take it out and put a bolt in its place right? The oil sensor on my 92 is on the oil pan. And also the 92 doesnt have egr and the 94 does, is there a easy way to work around that?
 

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Kevin,

I'm not sure of the differences between the the 2 years, but it should be fairly easy to just swap things over from one motor to the other.

I think that's a knock sensor on the side of the block. If you have no EGR on yours, why don't you just leave it off this one?

I'm sure someone with more knowledge will step up for you.

Joe
 

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That is the knock sensor on the side of the block, and you should have the same one on the 92 motor. As or the oil pan, personally I would run the 94 pan. If you know how to check your oil, you don't need that sensor, and more often than not it is that level sensor itself that is leaking in the first place. As for EGR, if you are using your 92 blower, then when you bolt the top end together it will be fine. If you are using the 94 blower and inlet, then buy or make a blockoff plate.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would use the 94 oil pan but it has deep scratches on it. Thank you both for all your help.
 

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You need to measure them and see how much they're worn really.

If you just want to refurb it as is, as long as nothing Looks worn too bad, it's probably ok; you can just re-ring it.

If you aren't going to measure it all, I hope you marked which ones came from where. :) It can be important, depending on clearances.
On my 4.6l, I had 7x "2" pistons, and 1x "3" piston. They're different sizes, by a bit.

You need to do valve stem seals, rod bearings, and crank bearings too; they're not too expensive.

If you're not having a valve job done, you need to Lap the Valves, too.

If I were you, I'd go annoy the hell out of dDUBb, and make him help. :) Isn't he local to you?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The valve seals are done, I finally found the right crankshaft bearings(federal mogul from napa), and connecting rod bearings. I just wanted to see what I should do with pistons before it gets put together. This is the worse looking piston. Im pretty sure my dad marked what number each piston is.
 

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Should I buy new pistons? I just trying not to spend too much money on this car, but I need it to last 100,000 miles. I plan on buying new piston rings. My dad will be doing the rebuilding.
Kevin:
Quick and dirty isn't something that I would associate with a rebuild potentially lasting 100K mi. This is 80s american engineering.

You area already likely doing this refresher on an engine that already has >100K mi on it AND once its rebuilt you will likely want to beat on it a little bit because (understandably) you'll want to play with your new toy.

I did two (three?) half ass rebuilds and the labor/effort it cost to rebuild let alone the engine removal/replacement effort dwarfed the machine shop labor & costs to do it right.

I would have been MUCH happier (and saved a good deal of $$$) if I had just done it right the first time.

1) 3.8L pistons will run you < $200. Some are even $120 set.
https://www.summitracing.com/search/part-type/pistons/make/ford/engine-size/3-8l-232/engine-type/v6

2) Before buying pistons & matching rings though, you should consider if its worth overboring the pistons.
Apparently you can go from 3.810in to 3.875in. I'm not suggesting to do this to make more power but to make sure you have a nice round seal for the piston rings.
Building the Ford 3.8L Engine

3) If you are taking the block apart, I assume you will install new camshaft and main bearings. If you haven't completely taken it apart, it might be useful to see how much clearance you have now and the condition of these bearings before deciding if its worth line honing the bores and installing undersized bearings to have a truly rebuild engine (vs a swap/re-ring job).

4) The heads are aluminum so you should at a minimum check to see that they are properly flat. A shop can do this if you don't have a machinists straight edge. I agree about the suggestion to replace the valve seals and at least lapping the valves.
 

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I started out with a simple "Dropped Valve, replace with JY engine" project that became a Mark Motor swap, and 2 years into that I bought a PI engine and swapped it.

That turned into the swap from hell; the labor alone I have in it is astounding. :)

I've pulled the engine 3 times for various BS reasons, and have had to buy more stuff each time, lol.
The last time was the tranny dipstick tube, lol.

Don't do that; Do it right instead. :)

Doing it right means crossing all the T's, dotting the I's, and making sure you aren't shortcutting something; if you do, it will bite you where it hurts most, the wallet. :)


I'd buy new pistons, do all the bearings, buy a new cam, new lifters, new pushrods; buy the good headgaskets, after making sure the block and heads meet the flatness spec.

I'd Measure the cylinders with a bore gauge and depending on how it looks either hone or bore the cylinders, which is pretty much everything. :D


It's cheap compared to it sitting, waiting for me to have time and feel like ******* with it again after it breaks.

That's what I'm doing with the mark motor I bought. :rolleyes:

I'm now at C-heads, from B-heads and rebuilding IMRCs, lol.

If you want to reuse parts, wait until you're done with the New Motor, and build the other block you have with the reused parts, so you have a spare, should something go wrong.


I have an iron block sitting here that the OG mark parts will go into someday, if I ever feel like dinking with it, lol.

Good luck with the build!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Has anyone ever purchased anything from Tom Morana(moranav6racing.com)? I was thing about going through him. He sells piston sets with rings and pins included. He also sells a stud girdle to help make a 2 bolt main crankshaft caps stronger than 4 bolt main. What do you guys think I can just call him up and order everything at once to make it simple.
 

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Only if the block needs it. Determined by measuring the cylinder walls / taper to figure out if you need to bore the engine over. If so, yes you need pistons. If you're just going to skip the measuring, hone the cylinders and throw new pistons on, don't expect it to last 100k miles.

SC engine block does NOT need any additional reinforcement on the mains. And to give up the 94/95 windage tray ? PFFT.
 

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Only if the block needs it. Determined by measuring the cylinder walls / taper to figure out if you need to bore the engine over. If so, yes you need pistons. If you're just going to skip the measuring, hone the cylinders and throw new pistons on, don't expect it to last 100k miles.

SC engine block does NOT need any additional reinforcement on the mains. And to give up the 94/95 windage tray ? PFFT.
Don't forget to add the 96? deep transmission pan while you have it apart. Thats good for an extra quart of badly needed oil
 

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This Is an SC; if there's a god, he has a manual tranny.

There were no 96 SC's.
 

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This SC in question is AOD = therefore god does not exist
I'm with you; that's the one advantage of an SC, in my book.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hmm extra quart of tranny fluid. I dont think AOD's and 4R70W's use the same pan do they? I dont know why SC with autos get so much hate. They are much faster off the line than a 4.6 T-Bird. Just not as fast as a manual SC.
 

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No, there's a bolt hole that different between the two.

Someone gave me an aluminum aod pan, and I spent an hour trying to get it to bolt up.

Of course it's one of the bolts you can barely see, lol.

It got recycled, after I got thru with 'reeducating' it, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok im planning on getting Tom Morana's powdered coated pistons(standard size) with floating piston pins and M.L.S. head gaskets. Cylinders and block has been magnafluxed, shaved and honed. I got standard size rings too. I plan on getting connecting rods resized,heads shaved too and use ARP chevy studs. Valve stems got new seals and have been seated. When pistons are installed what other machine work needs to be done? Does the pistons need to be balanced?
 

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OK; to really evaluate reusing those pistons, you need to really clean them, and measure them fully.

You need to make a sinkfull of simple green and hot water, 50/50, and soak them for about 10 minutes.

Scrub them with a nylon brush, or old toothbrush every 3 minutes or so.

Do not soak them over 15 minutes, max.

If you see them turning gray, remove them from the cleaning mix immediately; that's a phosphide coating forming.

You don't want that; it's rough.

After they're clean, rinse with warm water; you can scrub them with a toothbrush and baking soda to get the hard bits, but do not leave baking soda on the aluminum for more than seconds.

Don't get baking soda in the simplegreen bath. :)

After they're totally clean, you need to clean out the ring grooves, and inspect the ring lands, looking for cracks.
A broken ring makes a good tool for cleaning gunk out of the grooves; grind the edges so it doesn't gouge the piston.

Dye penetrant is a cool thing to do, but it's hard to do on a piston.

You want to know if there are cracks, because those bits might break off.

After they're totally clean, and have passed inspection for cracks, measure the pistons for wear, using either a set of calipers, or better, a micrometer.

You need to measure the piston and the bores.

Measure at the top, the ring spacings, and every 1/2" or so down the length, to look for barrel shapism. :) This pic leaves out at least two spots I'd measure.

You also measure 4 places around the piston and bores; every 45 degrees from perpendicular to the pin, to inline with the pin. (inline with the pin will be missing some points, due to the cutouts for the pins.)



This shows the first two positions, the other side 45 and across the pin gets measured too.

The skirt is wider than the top; this is normal.

If it's barrel shaped, i.e. the skirt is narrower than the middle, then you need new pistons; they'll slap in the bores, wearing everything faster, and possibly breaking off the skirts. BTDT.

If the bore is barrel shaped, it needs to be bored; it won't seal well, regardless of new pistons.

IDK what size the SC pistons are, but there should be measurements in the manual.

If they're off by more than 0.002", you need new stuff. I'd reuse everything if it's within 0.002".
That's a lot of wear with these, at least as far as my V8 4.6's. everything there has been below 0.001" from stock.

You will also need to hone the cylinder a bit, and put a cross hatch on it so the rings seal.

I bought one of these:
 
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