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Does anyone else have a red plastic plug in the bottom of thier oil pan.

It looks like the kind of red plug used as a thread protector for threaded holes in machine parts.

Since the car sat for 4 years, the plug dried out and is now a leaky S.O.B.

I'm thinking about draining the pan completely and sealing it up with some J.B. Weld.

Or is there something else that might work better?

The hole is about 3/8" and I don't know why it's there.
 

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It will, just make sure that the area is wire brushed clean, wipe it down with some acetone and then wipe again with a dry clean rag before applying the jb weld to make sure it's real clean.
 

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Not an experience on a TBIRD but...

My mother was driving her 01 Monte Carlo on the freeway where all off a sudden in a very close 2 lane only section because of construction, there was a giant Big-Rig yoke in the middle of the lane. Since they had those cement temporary walls she couldn't serve anywhere and she hit it. Kinda did alot of damage. Hit and put a hole in the oil pan, dent the tranny man, messed up the front aluminum sub-frame, lightly dented as it went all the way under the way and knocked and messed up the catalytic converter.

Thankfully she was only less than 3 miles from home, by the time she pulled up her car is leaking oil and such. We popped it up, drained it, cleaned it, sanded, The slot was kinda big, like a stick of gum or 2 big, while being about an inch or two long. JB welded that thing and my night she was driving again. We drove around with it like that for almost a few weeks before we got the insurance to fix it. =D. So JB weld should work no problem! But your hole is slightly bigger than mine.
 

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Wicked_Paintball said:
my question is, "Will J.B. Weld do the job?
Buckcreekbilly said:
It will, just make sure that the area is wire brushed clean, wipe it down with some acetone and then wipe again with a dry clean rag before applying the jb weld to make sure it's real clean.
There are two versions, there is "J B Weld" and then there is "J B Quick Weld".

For any high stress or high heated critical repair, use the old faithfull, longer curing, "J B Weld", it takes longer to cure but it'll stand higher temperatures and once hardened, it's tougher than the "J B Quick Weld".

I've used both for several things over the years, I've undone stuff fixed with both. Also, might aply some fibreglass cloth to the repair or something metal to fill the hole.

3/8" hole? Use imagination here. A 3/8" hole is 3/8" wide. A piece of 1/8" steel just under 3/8" wide X 5/8" long would go through it at an angle. Tap a hole dead center that steel for a 1/4" or 3/16" bolt, use a 1" fender washer on outside. Stick bolt through washer and thread into steel "bar" you just made, insert one end of bar into hole using bolt as handle, then slide in and let other end go into hole, then center so that bar is across hole, and tighten up bolt and washer is pulled up to hole. Once good-n-snug, apply the slow setting "J B Weld" over it all.

If you have oil pan off car .... better. Plug hole with two washers and bolt, use lock nut.

Screen in oil pump will stop bolts, plastic plugs, etc, but you do not want any filings in there.
 

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If you have oil pan off car .... better. Plug hole with two washers and bolt, use lock nut.
CrystalPistol, great advice, but...

If he has the pan off the car, he can probably buy a good one for $20 and shipping, worst case. :)

I use JB weld a lot, but not the oilpan, if I have a choice.

:)

Wicked Paintball, how did the plastic cap get there, or did you find it as the source of a leak?

I would not drive it with a plastic cap in there. The ones I've used forever (capplugs??) are thermoplastic, and melt in hot water... Not good for oil. That would explain the leak...

We are talking about a separate opening other than the drain plug, correct? (Just making sure, lol.)

So does that mean the oil has been dumped (while running) at least once? :(
 

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IF the pan was OFF, it would be a piece of cake to BRAZE it. But for an on the car job, jb weld will do the trick.
 

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I never said I would do it while it was in the car....
I have welded a pan wile it was in the car many many times.
oil isn't flammable, it's combustible,
the trick is to drain the oil for a few hours, remove the cap and dipstick, and clean the area very good.

when you weld it you use small overlapping stitches to keep the pan from getting to hot.

I used to do this to repair striped drain plugs by welding a nut to the pan.
 

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I have welded a pan wile it was in the car many many times.
oil isn't flammable, it's combustible,
the trick is to drain the oil for a few hours, remove the cap and dipstick, and clean the area very good.

when you weld it you use small overlapping stitches to keep the pan from getting to hot.

I used to do this to repair striped drain plugs by welding a nut to the pan.
HAZARDOUS to say the least. I have seen pans explode when done on a vehicle!!!!!!!
 

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You may be able to purge the crank case with the exhaust from another car. No 02 no Kaboom! It would be best to sue a TIG as you could control the heat use a mig and tack tack tack grind tack tack gring over and over until the patch is done.
 

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You may be able to purge the crank case with the exhaust from another car. No 02 no Kaboom! It would be best to sue a TIG as you could control the heat use a mig and tack tack tack grind tack tack gring over and over until the patch is done.
Car exhaust does still have oxygen in it, though, not that much. It would be quicker and easier just to purge the engine with shielding gas from the welder.

-Rob
 
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