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...can it be done without dropping the entire rear subframe? I've looked around and I haven't uncovered any procedures that show someone doing it that way.
 

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The service manual says to drop it to be able to use the tool to extract the bushing. I have never done this myself. The kit is Rotunda T89P-1000-E.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I didn't drop mine on the '93 Mark VIII. I did have to use an air chisel though. LOL :grin2:
OK, I have an air chisel. Do you care to share the process you used to do it without dropping the whole thing?

Also, it looks like the front bolts are seized. Do I just use a hole saw to drill a hole in the body/frame rail area directly by the bolt/bushing?
 

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It was a hard fought battle but yes, I holesawed a hole in the fender well to access the captive nut. I was able to finally get the bolt/nut to turn but the bolt was seized in the bushing sleeve and would not pull out. That's when the air chisel came out. I basically disintegrated the bushing with the air chisel. I had to sharpen the blade a couple times. Once the new bushing and hardware was back in place, I welded the nut to the body and used a electrical hole plug, body putty and sealer to patch the hole. Oh, I remember using soap and a jack to install the new bushing.

So, it wasn't easy but you can do it without dropping the subframe. I don't think you will be able to use the tool? I don't recall if the subframe pulled away from the body enough to get the remover adapter in there (judging by the pic, I didn't have one).
 

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It was a hard fought battle but yes, I holesawed a hole in the fender well to access the captive nut. I was able to finally get the bolt/nut to turn but the bolt was seized in the bushing sleeve and would not pull out. That's when the air chisel came out. I basically disintegrated the bushing with the air chisel. I had to sharpen the blade a couple times. Once the new bushing and hardware was back in place, I welded the nut to the body and used a electrical hole plug, body putty and sealer to patch the hole. Oh, I remember using soap and a jack to install the new bushing.

So, it wasn't easy but you can do it without dropping the subframe. I don't think you will be able to use the tool? I don't recall if the subframe pulled away from the body enough to get the remover adapter in there (judging by the pic, I didn't have one).
OK, that makes sense. I'm putting in Jay's UHMW bushings so the new part is a bit different than what I'm removing.
 

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OK, that makes sense. I'm putting in Jay's UHMW bushings so the new part is a bit different than what I'm removing.
Posting up pix would be very helpful; I have this to do. :)
 

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OK, I have some pics. And with those pics come the request for advice. The hottest torch I have is MAPP/Oxygen and these two bolts still don't budge no matter what I do. The bolt head on the passenger side is stripped and even my bolt/nut extractor is sliding off now.

Any thoughts?
 

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My Dremel is usually my best friend in these type of situations..

If you have rounded off the head of the bolt..Using a cut-off wheel on the Dremel, work your way around the head of the bolt..

Basically, squaring up the head of the bolt making it fit the next size smaller socket..Nice tight fit.. :)

You didn't mention if the nut was stripped, or not??

Anyways, Now that you have a little window in there..
You could get a pair of needle nose vice grips on the nut while you remove the bolt..

If you can't get a grip on the nut, just cut the nut off using a cut-off wheel on the Dremel..Then just get another nut/bolt..

That's what I would do.. ;)






Rayo..
 

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My Dremel is usually my best friend in these type of situations..

If you have rounded off the head of the bolt..Using a cut-off wheel on the Dremel, work your way around the head of the bolt..

Basically, squaring up the head of the bolt making it fit the next size smaller socket..Nice tight fit.. :)

You didn't mention if the nut was stripped, or not??

Anyways, Now that you have a little window in there..
You could get a pair of needle nose vice grips on the nut while you remove the bolt..

If you can't get a grip on the nut, just cut the nut off using a cut-off wheel on the Dremel..Then just get another nut/bolt..

That's what I would do.. ;)
Rayo..
The head on the passenger side is stripped. Honestly, the captured nut is more important than the bolt since I have bolts coming already.

I'm guessing that the seizing is occurring because it's rusted inside the metal sleeve inside the bushing.
 

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Don't know if this would help anyone. The passenger side forward bolt on mine was all rounded. I soaked captive nut in kroil for a week thru the gaps, the took the grinder and cut the head off. Then removed what was left of the bushing, dropped the sub frame and used a pipe wrench to remove the rest of the bolt.

I see your not removing your sub frame, how about welding a nut to the striped head so you can get a socket on that?

Good luck,

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Don't know if this would help anyone. The passenger side forward bolt on mine was all rounded. I soaked captive nut in kroil for a week thru the gaps, the took the grinder and cut the head off. Then removed what was left of the bushing, dropped the sub frame and used a pipe wrench to remove the rest of the bolt.

I see your not removing your sub frame, how about welding a nut to the striped head so you can get a socket on that?

Good luck,

Tim
Last thing first; I'm definitely removing the subframe. I've removed the gas tank so that I can work on this without big problems.

My next plan is the pipe wrench and then to weld a bigger nut on the bolt head so I can get a better bite.
 

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L...
My next plan is the pipe wrench and then to weld a bigger nut on the bolt head so I can get a better bite.
These were the suggestions I had.

You may have to split the captive nut, or cut it with a dremel.

I'm hoping I can use my press to get the bushings out...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
These were the suggestions I had.

You may have to split the captive nut, or cut it with a dremel.

I'm hoping I can use my press to get the bushings out...
I actually found the welded nut and pipe wrench suggestion on a Google search that turned up one from Eastwood.

You won't be able to use a press to get them out but I'll have the required tool available after I'm finished. ;) It may even be for sale. 0:)
 

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Wow, you guys are way too eager to cut holes in the chassis...lmao. I just replaced my subframe and installed Jay's UHMW bushings a few months ago, it's easier just to unbolt the bolts...and then reinstall them, the process was scary, but not difficult; you just use alignment dowels to realign the frame when done, and the rest is fixed by a wheel alignment. I used a breaker bar to remove my bolts, which are a 15mm; some of them felt like they were going to break as I removed them, but none did, they would just pop as they continued breaking loose from old age. I have found that spraying WD-40 in through the tiny hole where the brake line bracket is onto the captive nut helps. If the bolts break upon removal it's not a big deal, just move to the next ones and get the frame off the car, from there you can just twist the remaining bolt pieces out as the torque has been released from them.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wow, you guys are way too eager to cut holes in the chassis...lmao. I just replaced my subframe and installed Jay's UHMW bushings a few months ago, it's easier just to unbolt the bolts...and then reinstall them, the process was scary, but not difficult; you just use alignment dowels to realign the frame when done, and the rest is fixed by a wheel alignment. I used a breaker bar to remove my bolts, which are a 15mm; some of them felt like they were going to break as I removed them, but none did, they would just pop as they continued breaking loose from old age. I have found that spraying WD-40 in through the tiny hole where the brake line bracket is onto the captive nut helps. If the bolts break upon removal it's not a big deal, just move to the next ones and get the frame off the car, from there you can just twist the remaining bolt pieces out as the torque has been released from them.
I think you may be missing the point of this thread. My bolts are seized. I've used a 550 ft. lb. impact on them with no luck. I've used a 24" breaker bar with a cheater pipe with no luck. I've heated them with no luck.

If I could have just "unbolted" them I would have done that.
 

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...I'll have the required tool available after I'm finished. ;) It may even be for sale. 0:)
I call dibs, if you do so. :)

IIRC, the oem bolts from ford were "Epoxy-coated", whatever that means.

I've never heard of a set just unscrewing; maybe people only post the ones that are a *****, tho. :zdunno:


Black_Cat, Opening the closed parts just lets you get rust preventative in there, lol.
 
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