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wel it appears i have a rod that is knocking. from a little research i found that i need to change the rod bearing to fix this. can this be done with the engine in the car? is this covered in the haynes manual? if this can be done with the engine in the car, what would i be required to take off the engine to get to the bearings? how much can i expect the parts to cost if i change one of the rod bearings? any help would be appreciated:)
 

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Super Moderator
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In theory, yes it is possible, however it certainly isn't the easiest or the preferred method. Plus you don't know that the rod bearings are all that is wrong, so you could replace the rod bearings and still have a knock from some worn out main bearings or a busted wristpin, or any one of a bunch of other possible noises. Or you could get it apart and find the crank is wiped out or that the block may need some machine work, and then you would have to pull it out anyway. If you are going to do it, do it the right way and pull the motor out of the car and work on it on a stand. If it were my car, I would probably just find a good running 3.8 to swap in, since it would probably cost you less than rebuilding your current motor.
 

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The Parts Guy
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I agree with MadMikey. The only way to do it with the engine in the car would be to drop the K-member. While that isn't that big of a deal, unless you're sure the engine will not have to come out due to other undiscovered problems, I wouldn't waste time doing that.

Working with the engine on an engine stand will be much easier than trying to do it lying under the car anyway.

-Rod
 

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Make sure the engine is worth the work

TonyZ,

I have to agree with the idea of the other posters to take the engine out and really look into it to have a total picture of the condition. I've had too many experiences where I repaired something in thr bottom end- or top end for that matter and then had to go back and address another failure. When an enigne fails mechanically it's usually a sign of another problem or the end of a gneral wear cycle. I had a Leyland A-series engine that knocked only for a few days and when I pulled off the sump there were pieces of a big end bearing lying in the pan. With an 1/8" gap between rod end, the crackshaft was battered beyond usability. I did have one success though and I replaced rings, rebuilt the head and big ends in a Volvo 122S with the engine in the car and supsension dropped down, but that was an engine with 90,000 miles that didn't need reboring and the crankshaft was in spec.

Good luck on that one!

Cheers,

Bambi B
 
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